Michael Williams

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Michael Williams
Michael Williams.jpg
Texas Commissioner of Education
Incumbent
In office
September 1, 2012-Present
Years in position 2
PartyNonpartisan
Predecessor Robert Scott
Compensation
Base salary$215,000
Elections and appointments
Appointed2012
Appointed byGov. Rick Perry
Campaign $$4,888,204
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Texas Railroad Commission
1998-2011
Education
High schoolRobert E. Lee High School (1971)
Bachelor'sUniversity of Southern California
Master'sUniversity of Southern California
J.D.University of Southern California
Personal
Place of birthMidland, Texas
ProfessionAttorney
ReligionCatholic
Websites
Office website
Personal website
Michael Williams is the current Texas Commissioner of Education. He was appointed to the statewide position by Governor Rick Perry following the resignation of long-serving commissioner Robert Scott.[1] Scott resigned in early summer of 2012, months after the Texas Legislature decided to cut the public school budget by $5 billion. Williams took office on September 1, 2012.

Williams became the first African American to hold a statewide elected position in the Texas history in 1998 when then-Gov. George W. Bush appointed him to the Texas Railroad Commission. After his initial appointment, Williams was subsequently re-elected in 2000, 2002, and 2008. He stepped down from the railroad commission in order to pursue an ultimately unsuccessful bid for U.S. House representing the 25th Congressional District of Texas.[2]

Although his current post as state education commissioner is a nonpartisan, Williams has long been affiliated with the Republican party. His profile within the party rose over the years due to his work as a prosecutor in the Department of Justice under President Reagan, and his dual appointments by former President George H.W. Bush to serve as Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education and as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Law Enforcement at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.[3] He was also General Counsel of the Republican Party of Texas.

Biography

Williams was born and raised in Midland, Texas. After graduating from Robert E. Lee High School in 1971, he moved to out of his home state to continue his education at the University of Southern California, where Williams eventually earned a B.A., an M.A. in Public Administration, and a J.D.[3]

Soon after finishing law school, Williams returned to his hometown of Midland, Texas to serve as an assistant District Attorney. Since then, he has spent most of his career in Texas. Williams' legal resume includes serving with law firm of Haynes & Boone, L.L.P., as the General Counsel of the Republican Party of Texas, and the chairman of the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission. He has been an active member of the Texas Republican Party throughout his career. He was a prosecutor in the Department of Justice under President Reagan, and was appointed by former President George H.W. Bush to serve as Assistant Secretary of Education for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education and as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Law Enforcement at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.[3]

Williams has served as an adjunct professor at Texas Southern University in the School of Public Affairs and Texas Wesleyan School of Law.[3]

Education

  • B.A. - University of Southern California
  • M.A. - University of Southern California
  • J.D. - University of Southern California

Political career

Texas Commissioner of Education (2012-present)

Williams became the Texas Commissioner of Education on September 1, 2012. Governor Rick Perry appointed him following the resignation of long-serving commissioner Robert Scott.[4] Scott resigned in early summer of 2012, months after the Texas Legislature decided to cut the public school budget by $5 billion.

Chair, Texas Railroad Commission (1998-2011)

Prior to his appointment as the state's chief education official, Williams spent nearly 14 years on the Texas Railroad Commission. He was initially appointed to the commission in 1998 by President George W. Bush, and he was subsequently re-elected in 2000, 2002, and 2008. He was the first African American to hold a statewide elected position in the state. He stepped down from that position in 2011 to run for election to the U.S. House representing the 25th Congressional District of Texas.[5]

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 25th Congressional District elections, 2012

Williams ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Texas' 25th District. He was defeated by Wes Riddle and Roger Williams in the Republican primary on May 29, 2012.[6][7]

U.S. House, Texas District 25 Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngRoger Williams 25.1% 12,894
Green check mark transparent.pngWes Riddle 14.6% 7,481
Justin Hewlett 12% 6,178
Dave Garrison 11.9% 6,133
Michael Williams 10.5% 5,392
Dianne Costa 9.4% 4,810
Brian Matthews 3.6% 1,824
Charlie Holcomb 3.3% 1,690
Chad Wilbanks 3.1% 1,593
Bill Burch 3.1% 1,575
James Dillon 2.3% 1,174
Ernie Beltz, Jr. 1.2% 596
Total Votes 51,340

2008

On November 4, 2008, Michael L. Williams won re-election to the office of Texas Railroad Commissioner. He defeated Mark Thompson (D) and David Floyd (L) in the general election.

Texas Railroad Commissioner, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael L. Williams Incumbent 52.1% 4,003,789
     Democratic Mark Thompson 44.4% 3,406,174
     Libertarian David Floyd 3.5% 270,078
Total Votes 7,680,041
Election Results Via: Texas Secretary of State

2002

On November 5, 2002, Michael L. Williams won re-election to the office of Texas Railroad Commissioner. He defeated Sherry Boyles (D), Nazirite R. Flores Perez (L) and Charles L. Mauch (G) in the general election.

Texas Railroad Commissioner, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael L. Williams Incumbent 54.8% 2,407,036
     Democratic Sherry Boyles 41.5% 1,821,751
     Libertarian Nazirite R. Flores Perez 2.5% 110,160
     Green Charles L. Mauch 1.2% 52,322
Total Votes 4,391,269
Election Results Via: Texas Secretary of State

Issues

Campaign themes

2012

Williams's campaign website listed the following issues:[8]

  • Big Government
Excerpt: "We are made in the image of God and endowed with rights inherited from Him. Government’s primary responsibility is to advance the cause of freedom and promote, protect and secure the inalienable rights that were endowed to us by God."
  • Healthcare Reform
Excerpt: "We want Americans to have access to the best healthcare available at the lowest possible cost while preserving patient choices and increasing individual ownership of healthcare decisions. We should increase the amount of pretax dollars that a family can contribute to Health Savings Accounts and allow them to purchase health insurance, of any type and from any source, tax-free. "
  • Energy Security
Excerpt: "On energy, our motto should be “all of the above.” We should drill for more American oil and natural gas here in America. We should accelerate the commercialization of clean coal technologies with carbon capture and storage, build more nuclear plants to reduce carbon emissions, and expand the utilization of alternative and renewable energy sources."
  • Controlling Spending
Excerpt: "Our children will inherit a legacy of debt, with more debt accumulated under President Obama than the previous 43 presidents combined. We need to bring greater transparency to spending to curtail waste, reform the flawed earmark process, and control the growth of government."
  • Cutting Taxes
Excerpt: "The best tax system helps make poor people rich, not rich people poor. An efficient tax system has a broad tax base and a low tax rate. America has the second highest corporate tax burden in the developed world. We need to unleash the entrepreneurial spirit by cutting taxes and reforming the tax code with a flat tax."

Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Williams is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Williams raised a total of $4,888,203 during that time period. This information was last updated on May 9, 2013.[9]

Michael Williams's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2010 TX Railroad Commission Not up for election $85,904
2008 TX Railroad Commission Won $1,935,422
2006 TX Railroad Commission Not up for election $409,534
2004 TX Railroad Commission Not up for election $311,798
2002 TX Railroad Commission Won $1,257,934
2000 TX Railroad Commission Won $887,611
Grand Total Raised $4,888,203

2012

As of May 9, 2012, Williams raised $809,320 during the 2012 election cycle and spent $641,466, leaving him with $192,544 cash on hand. Of that, 95 percent came from individual contributions, while five percent came from PAC contributions.[10]

Personal

Williams currently resides in Arlington with his wife, Donna.[11] He is a member of Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church.

Recent news

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Know more information about this profile?
Submit a bio

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term "Michael + Williams + Texas + Education"

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Michael Williams News Feed

  • Loading...

See also

External links

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

References

Political offices
Preceded by
Robert Scott
Texas Commissioner of Education
2012-present
Succeeded by
NA