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Minnesota elections, 2012

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2013
Contents
1 2012 Elections
2 Eligibility to Vote
2.1 Primary election
2.2 General election
3 Voting absentee
3.1 Eligibility
3.2 Deadlines
3.3 Military and overseas voting
4 Voting early
5 See also
6 References

The state of Minnesota held elections in 2012. Below are the dates of note:

On the 2012 ballot Click here for all
November 6, 2012
Election Results
U.S. Senate (1 seat) Approveda Preview Article
U.S. House (8 seats) Approveda
State Executives Defeatedd N/A
State Senate (67 seats) Approveda Preview Article
State House (134 seats) Approveda
Ballot measures (

2 measure)

Approveda Preview Article

2012 Elections

Note: Election information listed on this page does not pertain to 2012 presidential elections. For more about Ballotpedia's areas of coverage, click here.
For election results in the 50 states, see our November 6, 2012 election results page

Elections by type

[edit]

See also: United States Senate elections in Minnesota, 2012
U.S. Senate, Minnesota General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAmy Klobuchar Incumbent 65.2% 1,854,595
     Republican Kurt Bills 30.5% 867,974
     Independence Stephen Williams 2.6% 73,539
     Grassroots Tim Davis 1.1% 30,531
     Progressive Michael Cavlan 0.5% 13,986
Total Votes 2,843,207
Source: Minnesota Secretary of State, "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

See also: Minnesota State Senate elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state senate.

Minnesota State Senate
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 30 39
     Republican Party 37 28
Total 67 67


See also: Minnesota House of Representatives elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state house.

Minnesota House of Representatives
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 61 73
     Republican Party 72 61
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 134 134

See also: Minnesota 2012 ballot measures
Type Title Subject Description Result
LRCA Amendment 1 Marriage Would ban same-sex marriage. Defeatedd


LRCA Amendment 2 Elections Would require people to present photo identification to vote. Defeatedd


Eligibility to Vote

Minnesota

Primary election

See also: Voting in the 2012 primary elections

Minnesota is one of 16 states to use an open primary system. Voters who wish to register in advance must pre-register at least 21 days before Election Day. However, voters could also register on Election Day at their polling place (Information about registering to vote)

General election

See also: Voting in the 2012 general elections

The deadline to register to vote is 21 days prior to the election day, which in 2012 was October 16.[1][2]

  • Voter ID info
  • Residency requirements: Resided in Minnesota for 20 days immediately preceding Election Day[3]
  • Same-day registration: Yes[4]

Voting absentee

AbsenteeMap.png
See also: Absentee Voting

Eligibility

You are eligible to vote absentee in an election if you cannot make it to the polls on election day for one of the following reasons:[5]

  • you are away from home
  • you are ill or disabled
  • you are an election judge serving in a precinct other than your own
  • you are unable to go to the polling place due to a religious observance or belief
  • an eligible emergency is declared by the governor or quarantine is declared by the federal or state government.

Deadlines

There is no specific deadline for applying for an absentee ballot. The ballot must then be returned on or before election day for it to be counted.[5]

Military and overseas voting

For full details, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program here.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Minnesota is one of 8 states which allow early voting but require an excuse to vote early. Early voting begins 46 days prior to the election and ends the day before election day.[6] The average number of days prior to an election that voters can cast an early ballot is 21 days in states with a definitive starting date.

To vote early you need to provide an excuse for why you will be unable to vote at the polls during normal voting hours. The following are valid reasons:[6]

  • you will be away from home on election day
  • you are ill or disabled
  • you are an election judge serving in a precinct other than your own
  • unable to go to the polling place due to a religious observance or belief

See also

References