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Mississippi's 1st Congressional District elections, 2012

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Mississippi's 1st Congressional District

General Election Date
November 6, 2012

Primary Date
March 13, 2012

November 6 Election Winner:
Alan Nunnelee Republican Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Alan Nunnelee Republican Party
Alan Nunnelee.jpg

Mississippi U.S. House Elections
District 1District 2District 3District 4

2012 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Mississippi.png
The 1st Congressional District of Mississippi held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.

Alan Nunnelee was re-elected on November 6, 2012.[1]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
January 13, 2012
March 13, 2012
November 6, 2012

Primary: Mississippi has an open primary system, meaning any registered voter can vote in any party's primary.

Voter registration: Voters had to register to vote in the primary by February 11, 2012. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 6, 2012.[2]

See also: Mississippi elections, 2012

Incumbent: Heading into the election was incumbent Alan Nunnelee (R), who had served since 2011.

This was the first election using new district maps based on 2010 Census data. Mississippi's 1st Congressional District is located in the northeastern portion of the state and includes DeSoto, Tate, Marshall, Lafayette, Calhoun, Benton, tippah, Alcorn, Tishoming, Prentiss, Lee, Union, Itawamba, Pontotoc, Chickasaw, Monroe, Clay, Lowndes, Webster, Choctaw, Oktibbeha, and Winston counties.[3]

Candidates

Note: Election results were added on election night as races were called. Vote totals were added after official election results had been certified. For more information about Ballotpedia's election coverage plan, click here. If you find any errors in this list, please email: Geoff Pallay.

General election candidates

Democratic Party Brad Morris
Republican Party Alan NunneleeGreen check mark transparent.png
Constitution Party Jim R. Bourland
Libertarian Party Danny Bedwell
Reform Party Chris Potts


March 13, 2012 primary results
Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

Constitution Party Constitution Party candidate

Libertarian Party Libertarian Party candidate

Reform Party Reform Party candidate

Election results

General Election

U.S. House, Mississippi District 1 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Brad Morris 36.9% 114,076
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngAlan Nunnelee Incumbent 60.4% 186,760
     Libertarian Danny Bedwell 1.2% 3,584
     Constitution Jim R. Bourland 0.8% 2,390
     Reform Chris Potts 0.8% 2,367
Total Votes 309,177
Source: Mississippi Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Republican Primary

U.S House of Representatives-Mississippi, District 1 Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAllen Nunnelee Incumbent 57.4% 43,487
Robert Estes 13.7% 10,390
Henry Ross 28.9% 21,944
Total Votes 75,821

Impact of Redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Mississippi

The 1st District was re-drawn after the 2010 Census. The new district is composed of the following percentages of voters of the old congressional districts.[7][8]

District partisanship

FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012 study

See also: FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

In 2012, FairVote did a study on partisanship in the congressional districts, giving each a percentage ranking (D/R) based on the new 2012 maps and comparing that to the old 2010 maps. Mississippi's 1st District became more Republican because of redistricting.[9]

  • 2012: 33D / 67R
  • 2010: 34D / 66R

Cook Political Report's PVI

See also: Cook Political Report's Partisan Voter Index

In 2012, Cook Political Report released its updated figures on the Partisan Voter Index, which measured each congressional district's partisanship relative to the rest of the country. Mississippi's 1st Congressional District had a PVI of R+14, which was the 55th most Republican district in the country. In 2008, this district was won by John McCain (R), 63-37 percent over Barack Obama (D). In 2004, George W. Bush (R) won the district 63-37 percent over John Kerry (D).[10]

District History

This is the 1st Congressional District prior to the 2010 redistricting.

2010

On November 2, 2010, Nunnelee won election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Travis W. Childers (D), Wally Pang (I), Les Green (I), A. G. Baddley (I), Rick "Rico" Hoskins (I), Barbara Dale Washer (Reform), Harold M. Taylor (L), and Gail Giaramita (C) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House of Representatives, Mississippi's 1st Congressional District, General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngAlan Nunnelee 55.3% 121,074
     Democratic Travis W. Childers Incumbent 40.8% 89,388
     Independent Wally Pang 1% 2,180
     Independent Les Green 0.9% 2,020
     Independent A. G. Baddley 0.9% 1,882
     Independent Rick "Rico" Hoskins 0.2% 478
     Reform Barbara Dale Washer 0.2% 389
     Libertarian Harold M. Taylor 0.2% 447
     Constitution Gail Giaramita 0.6% 1,235
Total Votes 219,093

Campaign donors

Brad Morris

Brad Morris (2012) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[12]March 31, 2012$8,240.00$19,615.00$(4,040.23)$23,814.77
July Quarterly[13]June 30, 2012$23,814.77$40,929.48$(53,995.55)$10,748.70
Running totals
$60,544.48$(58,035.78)

Alan Nunnelee

Alan Nunnelee (2012) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[14]March 31, 2012$351,875.49$127,298.99$(224,807.36)$254,367.12
July Quarterly[15]July 15, 2012$254,367.12$171,344.73$(158,053.16)$267,658.69
Running totals
$298,643.72$(382,860.52)

See also

External links

References