Mississippi gubernatorial election, 2011

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2011
State Executive Official Elections

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Main article: Mississippi state executive official elections, 2011

The Mississippi gubernatorial election of 2011 was held on Tuesday, November 8, 2011, following a primary on August 2, 2011. Mississippi is one of 21 states with a mixed primary system. Voters do not have to register with a party, but they must intend to support the party nominations if they vote in the primary election.[1]

Republican Phil Bryant, the state's lieutenant governor at the time, defeated Democrat Hattiesburg mayor Johnny DuPree to win the general election.

Term limits prevented incumbent Governor Haley Barbour (R) from running for a third term, and there was a large field of candidates jockeying for his seat. Both Republicans and Democrats had multiple candidates enter the primary elections. One independent candidate and two Reform Party candidates initially qualified for the general election, though all three third-party candidates were removed from the ballot in early September 2011. Independent candidate William D. Oatis withdrew from the race citing a lack of money to support his campaign, while the Mississippi State Board of Election Commission disqualified Reform Party hopefuls Bobby Kearan and Shawn O'Hara. Despite an announcement on the Reform Party National Committee's website that Kearan was their official candidate, the Mississippi State Board of Elections granted formal recognition to the O'Hara campaign.[2] O'Hara had filed to run for both governor and state treasurer in the 2011 elections, but Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, citing a Mississippi law that stipulated candidates who file for multiple offices can only run in the race for which they filed most recently, kicked O'Hara off the gubernatorial ballot.[3]

Race background

Republican Phil Bryant, lieutenant governor to term-limited Gov. Haley Barbour, made his candidacy official on January 3, 2011.[4] Bryant was immediately given front-runner status in the race to succeed Barbour. Bryant hoped Barbour's popularity would rub off on him during his campaign, combined with Mississippi's record of Republican preference at the voting booth. Two new political faces, Hudson Holliday, a retired major general for the U.S. Coast Guard, and businessman Dave Dennis, sought the GOP nomination with Bryant. Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann and State Treasurer Tate Reeves, were considered potential contenders for the open governor's seat, but ultimately declined to run.

Democrats in race included businessman Bill Luckett and Mayor Johnny DuPree of Hattiesburg. Overall, at the gubernatorial level, Mississippi's Democratic bench looked thin.[5]

Bryant and DuPree won their respective parties' nominations in the August primary and advanced to the November 8 general election, where Bryant triumphed with 61 percent of the vote.

General election

Results

Governor of Mississippi, 2011
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPhil Bryant 61% 544,851
     Democratic Johnny DuPree 39% 348,617
Total Votes 893,468
Election Results via Mississippi Secretary of State


Candidates

Former candidates

Primary election

Results

Runoff

Governor - Democratic primary runoff results
Party Candidate Vote Percentage
     Democratic Party ApprovedaJohnny DuPree 55%
     Democratic Party Bill Luckett, Jr. 45%
Total Votes 323,284


Republican primary

Gubernatorial Republican Primary election
Party Candidate Vote Percentage
     Republican Party ApprovedaPhil Bryant 59.5%
     Republican Party Dave Dennis 25.7%
     Republican Party Ron Williams 8.8%
     Republican Party Hudson Holliday 4.7%
     Republican Party James Broadwater 1.2%
Total Votes 289,788

Democratic primary

Gubernatorial Democratic Primary election
Party Candidate Vote Percentage
     Democratic Party ApprovedaJohnny DuPree 43.5%
     Democratic Party ApprovedaBill Luckett, Jr. 39.2%
     Democratic Party William Bond Compton, Jr. 9.8%
     Democratic Party Guy Dale Shaw 7.3%
Total Votes 412,530

Candidates

Race tracking

See also: Ballotpedia Election Racetracking
2011 Race Rankings for Governor of Mississippi
Race Tracker Race Rating
The Cook Political Report Likely Republican
Governing Politics Safe Republican
Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball Solid Republican
The Rothenberg Political Report Republican Favored
Overall Call Likely Republican

Polls

Public Policy Polling conducted a telephone survey of 817 Mississippi voters, asking them which candidate they would vote for in a number of pair-ups. The following tables present their findings, which made it clear that the Republican Party, regardless of which candidate went to the general election, was very likely to win.

The margin of error for all surveys is +/- 3.4 percent.

Date of Poll Pollster Bryant (R) DuPree (D) Undecided Number polled
Mar 24-27 Public Policy Polling 56% 25% 19% 817
Date of Poll Pollster Bryant (R) Luckett (D) Undecided Number polled
Mar 24-27 Public Policy Polling 53% 27% 20% 817
Date of Poll Pollster Dennis (R) DuPree (D) Undecided Number polled
Mar 24-27 Public Policy Polling 41% 28% 31% 817
Date of Poll Pollster Dennis (R) Luckett (D) Undecided Number polled
Mar 24-27 Public Policy Polling 43% 25% 32% 817
Date of Poll Pollster Holliday (R) DuPree (D) Undecided Number polled
Mar 24-27 Public Policy Polling 37% 28% 35% 817
Date of Poll Pollster Holliday (R) Luckett (D) Undecided Number polled
Mar 24-27 Public Policy Polling 38% 28% 34% 817

Key dates

Deadline Event
Mar. 1 Declaration of candidacy
June 18 Absentee voting begins for the primary election
July 2 Voter registration (in person) for the primary
July 3 Voter registration (postmark on a mailed application) for the primary
Aug. 2 Primary election
Aug. 23 Runoff primary election, if required
Sept. 2 Certification of results for primary
Sept. 24 Absentee voting begins for the general election
Oct. 8 Voter registration (in person) for the general election
Oct. 9 Voter registration (postmark on a mailed application) for the general election
Nov. 8 General election
Nov. 29 Runoff general election, if required
Dec. 8 Certification of results for general election

See also

External links

Campaign sites:

References