Nevada Constitution Language on Voting, Question 7 (2004)

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The Nevada Constitution Language on Voting Question, also known as Question 7 or Repeals an Obsolete Provision Concerning Those Permitted to Vote, was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment on the November 2, 2004 election ballot in Nevada , where it was approved.[1]

Election results

Question 7 (Constitution Language on Voting)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 418,857 54.3%
No351,98245.7%

Official results via: Nevada Legislative Counsel Bureau - Research Division

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended to change the provision that prohibits an "idiot or insane person" from voting to refer instead to "a person who has been adjudicated mentally incompetent, unless restored to legal capacity" and to repeal a provision relating to the election of United States Senators by the Legislature that was made obsolete by the adoption of the 17th Amendment to the United States Constitution?[2]

The language that appeared in the voter's guide:

EXPLANATION
Currently, the Nevada Constitution provides that no "idiot or insane person" shall be entitled to vote in Nevada. The proposed amendment would change this language to provide that no person "who has been adjudicated mentally incompetent, unless restored to legal capacity," shall be entitled to vote in Nevada. A "Yes" vote is a vote to remove language from Section 1, Article 2 of the Nevada Constitution referring to an idiot or insane person and replace it with language referring to persons who have been adjudicated mentally incompetent and not restored to legal capacity. A "No" vote is a vote to allow the language of this provision to remain unchanged.
Section 34, Article 4 of the Nevada Constitution provides that the Legislature shall elect Nevada's United States Senators in joint convention of both Houses of the Legislature. This section also states that a vacancy in the office of United States Senator must be filled by the Legislature in a joint convention. The provision was nullified in 1913 with the adoption of the 17th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which provides for the direct, popular election of United States Senators and the filling of vacancies in the office of United States Senator through a vote of the people. A "Yes" vote is a vote to repeal this provision. A "No" vote is a vote to allow the language of this provision to remain unchanged.[2]

See also

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