Oregon Licenses for Alcohol Sales, Measure 6 (1940)

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The Oregon Licenses for Alcohol Sales Bill, was on the November 5, 1940 ballot in Oregon as a veto referendum, where it was defeated, thus overturning the legislation. The measure would have required licenses to sell alcohol to consumers.[1]

Election results

Oregon Measure 6 (1940)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No235,12859.81%
Yes 158,004 40.19%

Election results via: Oregon Blue Book

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Referendum Ordered by Petition of the People

BILL TO FURTHER, REGULATE SALE AND USE OF ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR - Purpose: Permitting licensees to sell consumers, at one time, 5 to 55 gallons of wine having not over 14 percent alcohol by weight; licensed class A hotels may have entertainment and dancing; forbidding anyone not holding hotel, restaurant or club license to serve, permit being served, use or permit being used for any financial consideration any room, place, bar, glasses, mixers, locker, storage place, chairs, tables, or facilities for mixing, storing, serving, drinking spirituous liquors, forbidding anyone to have or permit others to have alcoholic liquors on his premises unless licensed by or representing the commission although having federal retailer's permit.
Vote YES or NO


310. Yes. I vote for the proposed amendment.

311. No. I vote against the proposed amendment.

[2]

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Oregon State Library, "State of Oregon Official Voters' Pamphlet," accessed November 19, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.