Oregon Real Estate Fees Amendment (2010)

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The Oregon Real Estate Fees Amendment, also known as Initiative 79, did not appear on the November 2, 2010 statewide ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment. The measure called for prohibiting the imposition of real estate transfer taxes, fees, assessments, except those operative by a certain date, according to the draft ballot title.[1] According to the secretary of state, supporters did not file signatures in an attempt to qualify the measure for the 2010 ballot.

Ballot summary

The draft ballot title for Initiative 79 was:[2]

Amends Constitution: Prohibits imposition of real estate transfer taxes, fees, assessments, except those operative by certain date.

Result of "Yes" Vote: "Yes" vote prohibits state, city, county, district, political subdivision/municipal corporation from imposing real estate transfer taxes, fees, assessments, except those operative by certain date.

Result of "No" Vote: "No" vote retains existing law, prohibiting city, county, district, other political subdivision/municipal corporation from imposing real estate transfer taxes or fees, with certain exceptions.

Summary: Amends constitution. Current statutory law prohibits a city, county, district, or other political subdivision or municipal corporation of this state from imposing, by ordinance or any other law, taxes or fees on the transfer of real estate, with certain exceptions. Measure prohibits the state and any city, county, district, or other political subdivision or municipal corporation of the state from imposing, by ordinance or any other law, taxes, fees or other assessments that are based upon the transfer of any interest in real property or are measured by the consideration paid or received upon the transfer of any interest in real property. Measure exempts from the prohibition any taxes, fees, or other assessments that were in effect and operative on December 31, 2009. Other provisions.

Support

The Oregon Association of Realtors supported the proposed measure. Jana Jarvis, a lobbyist for the association, said the tax was too much and "makes home ownership less affordable." The major concern, said Jarvis, was declining home ownership in the state.[3]

Path to the ballot

See also: Oregon signature requirements

According to the secretary of state, supporters did not file signatures in an attempt to qualify the measure for the 2010 ballot. Petitions for an initiated constitutional amendment required eight percent of 1,379,475, or 110,358 signatures. The deadline for filing signatures for the November 2, 2010 ballot was July 2, 2010.

See also

External links

References