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San Marcos Unified School District bond proposition, Measure K (November 2010)

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A San Marcos Unified School District bond proposition, Measure K was on the November 2, 2010 ballot for voters in the San Marcos Unified School District in San Diego County. It was approved.

Measure K allows the school board of the San Marcos Unified School District to borrow $287 million. The money will be spent on "repair aging, deteriorating classrooms/schools, attract quality teachers and offset State cuts by: removing asbestos, lead paint, repairing roofs, plumbing, wiring; preventing overcrowding; upgrading instructional technology, libraries, science labs; improving seismic, fire and student safety; and improving disabled access."

Repayment of Measure K will cost each homeowner in the district about $44 for each $100,000 in assessed property value.[1]

Election results

  • Yes: 20,065 (63.38%) Approveda
  • No: 11,594 (36.62%)

Election results are from the San Diego County elections division as of November 26, 2010.

A 55 percent supermajority vote was required for approval.

Support

San Marcos Unified School Superintendent Kevin Holt was a vocal supporter of Measure K.[1]

Text of measure

The question on the ballot:

Proposition K: To maintain excellent local schools, repair aging, deteriorating classrooms/schools, attract quality teachers and offset State cuts by: removing asbestos, lead paint, repairing roofs, plumbing, wiring; preventing overcrowding; upgrading instructional technology, libraries, science labs; improving seismic, fire and student safety; and improving disabled access; shall San Marcos Unified School District issue $287 million in bonds, at legal interest rates, with citizens’ oversight, mandatory audits, no money for District salaries, and all funds remaining local?[2]

See also

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