Smart Girl Politics

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Smart Girl Politics
Grassroots
Smart Girl Politics.jpg
Leadership: Stacy Mott
Political Party: Nonpartisan
Website: Smart Girl Politics
Email: info@smartgirlpolitics.org
Smart Girl Politics (SGP) is a leading organization in the Tea Party movement, and a sponsor of the Post-Party Summit. It was founded by Stacy Mott in 2008.

Smart Girl Politics started as a blog in July of 2008. In November of that year, founder Stacy Mott placed a help wanted ad on her blog asking for conservative women to join her in a new conservative movement. The organization took off from the initial help wanted ad, and the sixty emails Mott received after she posted it.

Mission

According to their website, SGP is a grass roots organization that promotes the opinions and principles of conservative women. They are dedicated to the advancement of conservative women in the Republican Party. Men are more than welcome to join. Their mission is:

  • To strengthen support for those political candidates demonstrating a keen and unapologetic commitment to conservative principles and values.
  • To support individual and collective efforts that improve our local, state and national conservative communities.
  • To debate and develop clear positions that encourage conservative activism and consumerism in order to counter the negative or injudicious activity of popular culture via the mainstream media.
  • To strengthen their community economic development in ways that reflect fiscal conservatism and responsible capitalism.
  • To empower women everywhere to stand against the nefarious “ism’s” plaguing the world.
  • To celebrate our differences, challenge our paradigms through accountable and responsible thoughts and actions.[1]

Background

This event was part of a national movement referred to as the Chicago Tea Party. The series of protests began in Seattle, Washington on February 16, 2009, later gaining momentum on Thursday, February 19, when Rick Santelli in an on-air segment on CNBC Business Newslive called for a "Chicago Tea Party." Santelli's remarks became known as the "Rant Heard 'Round the World."[2]

Organizers sprang up in many different quarters of the fiscally conservative movement online and include Top Conservatives on Twitter, Smart Girl Politics, Don't Go, Americans for Tax Reform, the Heartland Institute, American Spectator Magazine, the New American Tea Party and many others.[3]

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