Spencer Bachus

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Spencer Bachus
Spencer Bachus.jpg
U.S. House, Alabama, District 6
Incumbent
In office
1993-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 21
PartyRepublican
PredecessorBen Erdreich (D)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
Cost per vote$13.25 in 2012
First electedNovember 3, 1992
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$10,666,002
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Alabama Board of Education
1986-1990
Alabama State House of Representatives
1984-1986
Alabama State Senate
1983
Education
Bachelor'sAuburn University, 1969
J.D.University of Alabama, 1972
Military service
Service/branchAlabama National Guard
Years of service1969-1971
Personal
BirthdayDecember 28, 1947
Place of birthBirmingham, AL
Net worth$631,507
ReligionBaptist
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Spencer Bachus (b. December 28, 1947, Birmingham, AL) is a Republican member of the U.S. House representing Alabama's 6th Congressional District. Bachus was first elected to the House in 1992 and will be retiring at the end of his current term.[1]

Bachus most recently won re-election in 2012. He defeated Scott Beason, Al Mickle and David Standridge in the March 13 Republican primary.[2] He then defeated Democrat Penny Bailey in the November 6 general election.[3][4]

The March 13 primary received a great deal of attention because of the Super PAC Campaign for Primary Accountability, which targeted incumbents in primaries across the country. The 6th District primary was called the top race to watch in Alabama. Despite the increased primary opposition, Bachus was able to win handily without the need for a runoff election, securing 58.5% of the vote.[5][6]

Bachus began his political career by serving in the Alabama State Senate from 1983 to 1984. He then served in the Alabama House of Representatives from 1984 to 1987.

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Bachus is an average Republican member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Republican Party on the majority of bills.

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Bachus' academic, professional and political career:[7]

  • 1969: Graduated from Auburn University with B.A.
  • 1972: Graduated from University of Alabama School of Law
  • 1969-1971: National Guard
  • 1983-1984: Alabama State Senate
  • 1984-1987: Alabama House of Representatives
  • 1987-1991: Alabama board of education
  • 1991-1992: Chairman, Alabama Republican executive committee
  • 1993-Present: U.S. Representative from Alabama

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Bachus serves on the following committees:[8]

2011-2012

Key votes

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1%) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14% of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[9] For more information pertaining to Bachus's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[10]

National security

NDAA

Voted "Yes" Bachus voted for HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[11]

DHS Appropriations

Voted "Yes" Bachus voted for HR 2217 - the DHS Appropriations Act (2014) Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 that was largely along party lines.[12]

CISPA (2013)

Voted "Yes" Bachus voted for HR 624 - the CISPA (2013). The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill would allow federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities. The bill was largely supported by Republicans, but divided the Democratic Party.[13]

Economy

Farm bill

Voted "Yes" On January 29, 2014, the U.S. House approved the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, H.R. 2642, also known as the Farm Bill.[14] The bill passed by a vote of 251-166. The nearly 1,000-page bill reformed and continued various programs of the Department of Agriculture through 2018. The $1 trillion bill expanded crop insurance for farmers by $7 billion over the next decade and created new subsidies for rice and peanut growers that would kick in when prices drop.[15][16] However, cuts to the food stamp program cut an average of $90 per month for 1.7 million people in 15 states.[16] Bachus voted with 161 other Republican representatives in favor of the bill.

2014 Budget

Voted "Yes" On January 15, 2014, the Republican-run House approved H.R. 3547, a $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September 30, 2014.[17][18] The House voted 359-67 for the 1,582 page bill, with 64 Republicans and three Democrats voting against the bill.[18] The omnibus package included 12 annual spending bills to fund federal operations.[19] It included a 1% increase in the paychecks of federal workers and military personnel, a $1 billion increase in Head Start funding for early childhood education, reduced funding to the Internal Revenue Service and the Environmental Protection Agency and protected the Affordable Care Act from any drastic cuts. Bachus voted with the majority of the Republican party in favor of the bill.[17]

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Voted "Yes" On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[20] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[21] Bachus voted to approve the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[22]

Voted "Yes" The shutdown finally ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[23] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Bachus voted for HR 2775.[24]

Federal Pay Adjustment Elimination

Voted "Yes" Bachus voted for HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees. The bill passed the House on February 15, 2013, with a vote of 261 - 154. The bill would prevent a 0.5% pay increase for all federal workers from taking effect, saving the federal government $11 billion over 10 years.[25]

Immigration

King Amendment

Voted "No" In June 2013 the House approved an amendment to the Department of Homeland Security spending bill that would end the department's discretion policies by cutting off funding for the proposed DREAM Act, which would have temporarily halted the deportations of young immigrants if they have served in the military or are attending college. This vote overturns an executive order signed by President Obama that formalized a process for the "Dreamers" to remain in the U.S.[26][18][27]

The amendment, offered by Rep. Steve King (R) of Iowa, passed the House by a vote of 224-201 and was approved mostly along party lines. However, three Democrats supported the amendment and six Republicans opposed it, while nine members did not vote.[27]Bachus was one of the six Republican members who voted against the amendment.[18]

The amendment would effectively demand the government force out "Dreamers" who came to the U.S. as children.[27] It contrasts with comprehensive immigration reform efforts, including proposed DREAM Act style legislation, and would resume the deportation of hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought illegally to the United States as children.[28] The amendment was the first immigration-related vote in either chamber of Congress in 2013, and blocks many of the provisions that are mirrored in the Senate’s Gang of Eight bill.[29][27]

Healthcare

Healthcare Reform Rules

Voted "Yes" Bachus voted for House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires that all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[30]

Social issues

Abortion

Voted "Yes" Bachus voted for HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196 that largely followed party lines. The purpose of the bill is to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[31]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "No" Bachus voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was 1 of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[32]

Issues

On The Issues Vote Match

Spencer Bachus' Vote Match results from On The Issues.
See also: On The Issues Vote Match

On The Issues conducts a VoteMatch analysis of elected officials based on 20 issue areas. Rather than relying on incumbents to complete the quiz themselves, the VoteMatch analysis is conducted using voting records, statements to the media, debate transcripts or citations from books authored by or about the candidate. Based on the results of the quiz, Bachus is a Hard-Core Conservative. Bachus received a score of 13 percent on social issues and 78 percent on economic issues.[33]

On The Issues organization logo.

The table below contains the results of analysis compiled by staff at On The Issues.

On The Issues Vote Quiz[34]
Economic Issues Social Issues
Issue Stance Issue Stance
Legally require hiring women & minorities Opposes Abortion is a woman's unrestricted right Strongly Opposes
Expand ObamaCare Strongly Opposes Comfortable with same-sex marriage Strongly Opposes
Vouchers for school choice Strongly Favors Keep God in the public sphere Strongly Favors
Absolute right to gun ownership Strongly Favors Human needs over animal rights Favors
Higher taxes on the wealthy Strongly Favors Stricter punishment reduces crime Strongly Favors
Support & expand free trade Favors Pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens Strongly Favors
Stricter limits on political campaign funds Favors Maintain US sovereignty from UN Favors
Prioritize green energy Strongly Opposes Expand the military Favors
Stimulus better than market-led recovery Strongly Opposes Stay out of Iran Strongly Opposes
Privatize Social Security Strongly Favors Never legalize marijuana Strongly Favors
Note: Information last updated: 2014.[33]

Insider trading investigation

On February 9, 2012, the same day that the U.S. House voted 417-2 to pass new ethics requirements on legislators and federal agency officials, The Washington Post reported that Bachus was under investigation by the Office of Congressional Ethics (OCE) for possible violations of insider-trading laws.[35] It is the first time such a case has involved a member of Congress since the OCE was created in March 2009.[36] The ethics bill began after a "60 Minutes" profile of Peter Schweizer's book "Throw Them All Out," which addressed stock trading in Congress, including activity by Bachus.[37]

In the summer of 2008, while a member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Bachus made several options bets on railroads. On two occasions he bet the stock of Burlington Northern Railroad would rise - in July he made a $16,588 profit on the bet, while in August he lost $2,900.[36] In September 2008, Bachus, the highest ranking Republican member of the Financial Services Committee, took part in a closed-door meeting with then-Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke. The next day, Bachus placed trades betting the nation's financial markets would broadly decline, which netted him $5,715. The same day he made $12,713 on a bet that General Electric stock would rise. The book, however, stated incorrectly that Bachus bet GE's stock would fall. Schweizer conceded his mistake, but Bachus wrote to the publisher that “The book is absolutely false and factually inaccurate when it states that I ‘shorted General Electric options’ and did so ‘four times in a single day.’ ” He went on to say that no insider information was passed during the meeting.[36]

Bachus acknowledged on February 10 that he was the target of an investigation, but said he believes the inquiry will clear his name. In a statement, Bachus said, “I welcome the opportunity to set the record straight. I respect the congressional ethics process. I have fully abided by the rules governing Members of Congress and look forward to the full exoneration this process will provide.”[38]

Elections

2014

See also: Alabama's 6th Congressional District elections, 2014

Bachus is not running for re-election to the House in 2014. In a statement issued by his office, he said

"It has been the greatest privilege imaginable to serve as the representative of the people of Alabama in the United States House of Representatives. It is an honor that I never dreamed could have been possible for me and the words ‘thank you’ are far from adequate. But as Ecclesiastes 3 says, to everything there is a season and I feel in my heart that now is the time for me to announce this decision and allow others to have the opportunity to serve. This was a family decision, because my wife Linda, our five children, and our seven grandchildren have always been my biggest source of support, strength, and joy. Since I will continue to be the representative for the Sixth District until the end of my term, I do not consider today a ‘goodbye.’ There is much important work that remains to be done and what I would like to see above anything else before I leave is a spending reduction plan that will put the federal government on a sensible and sustainable financial path going forward."[1]

2012

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2012

Spencer Bachus campaign ad from January 2012

Bachus won re-election to the 6th Congressional District in 2012. He defeated Scott Beason, Al Mickle and David Standridge in the March 13 Republican primary. He then defeated Penny H. Bailey in the November 6 general election.[39] Bachus had not faced a general election challenge since 2002, and he won his 2010 primary with more than 75 percent of the vote. The 2012 primary was called his "toughest electoral test in years."[5]

There was also a Democratic candidate on the general election ballot in the district for the first time since 1998.[40]

U.S. House, Alabama District 6 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Penny H. Bailey 28.6% 88,267
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngSpencer Bachus Incumbent 71.2% 219,262
     Write-In N/A 0.2% 573
Total Votes 308,102
Source: Alabama Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"
U.S. House, Alabama District 6 Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngSpencer Bachus Incumbent 58.5% 61,485
Scott Beason 27.4% 28,854
David Standridge 11.2% 11,728
Al Mickle 2.6% 2,781
Stan Pate 0.2% 190
Justin Barkley 0.1% 128
Total Votes 105,166

Targeted by Super PAC

The Campaign for Primary Accountability, a Houston-based super PAC, had their sights set on defeating Spencer Bachus (R) in the 2012 primary. Curtis Ellis, a spokesman for the CPA, said "Incumbents like Mr. Bachus...are longtime passengers on the inside-the-beltway gravy train."[41] They backed Bachus' challenger in the Republican primary, Scott Beason.

The CPA, which went after incumbents of both parties, stated on their website "Our goal is to bring true competition to our electoral process, to give voters real information about their choices, and to restore fair, not fixed, elections."[42] Bachus said he asked a friend from Houston to contact Leo Linbeck, the grandfather of Leo Linbeck III, one of the CPA's largest donors. He, however, has long been deceased.[43]

According to a Washington Post report, as of March 7 the CPA had spent $53,000 on TV ads and phone calls to Republican voters in Bachus' district.[44] A Politico report on March 9 said the CPA had spent $125,000 in the race.[45]

Following Bachus' win in the primary, he, along with some media outlets, tried to paint the victory as a clear defeat for the CPA, stating, "We overcame a lot of big money. They spent hundreds of thousands of dollars distorting my record, but the voters of the 6th District didn't go for it."[46] According to a report in the LA Times, the group spent $322,000 in Alabama, targeting Bachus as well as congressman Jo Bonner in the 1st District. However, Bachus' campaign alone spent more than five times that sum, dumping $1.5 million into the primary.[47]

As of February 16, 2012, Bachus has been in office longer than 345 members of congress. Thirty-one have been in office the same number of years as Bachus, while 59 have been in office longer than him. In the Alabama delegation, he is the senior representative out of the seven members.

Endorsements

  • National Right to Life[48]
  • Business Council of Alabama[49]
  • National Association of REALTORS®.[50]
  • Birmingham News[51]
  • Former Governor Bob Riley[52]
  • U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions[53]
  • Central Alabama Fire Chief’s Association[54]

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Bachus is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Bachus raised a total of $10,666,002 during that time period. This information was last updated on March 21, 2013.[65]

Spencer Bachus's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 US House (Alabama, District 6) Won $2,725,003
2010 US House (Alabama, District 6) Won $1,415,672
2008 US House (Alabama, District 6) Won $1,460,646
2006 US House (Alabama, District 6) Won $1,638,815
2004 US House (Alabama, District 6) Won $1,647,636
2002 US House (Alabama, District 6) Won $1,105,801
2000 US House (Alabama, District 6) Won $672,429
Grand Total Raised $10,666,002

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Bachus' reports.[66]

Spencer Bachus (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[67]April 15, 2013$260,462.29$102,545.86$(51,398.46)$311,609.69
July Quarterly[68]July 15, 2013$311,609.69$128,255.14$(107,670.83)$332,194.00
October Quarterly[69]October 11, 2013$332,194.00$57,952.29$(182,604.68)$207,541.61
Running totals
$288,753.29$(341,673.97)

2012

Breakdown of the source of Bachus' campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Bachus won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Bachus' campaign committee raised a total of $2,725,004 and spent $2,904,500.[70] This is more than the average $1.5 million spent by House winners in 2012.[71]

Cost per vote

Bachus spent $13.25 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Bachus' campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Bachus won re-election to the U.S. House in 2010. During that election cycle, Bachus' campaign committee raised a total of $1,415,672 and spent $1,634,114. The percentage of contributions from PACs was 72 percent, while individual contributions made up 41 percent.[72]

His top 5 contributors between 2009-2010 were:

U.S. House, Alabama District 6, 2010 - Spencer Bachus Campaign Contributions
Total Raised $1,415,672
Total Spent $1,634,114
Total Raised by General Election Opponent $0
Total Spent by General Election Opponent $0
Top contributors to Spencer Bachus's campaign committee
Drummond Co$20,000
Deloitte LLP$14,400
McWane Inc$12,800
Ernst & Young$11,000
Jones, Walker et al$11,000
Top 5 industries that contributed to campaign committee
Real Estate$209,250
Insurance$188,950
Securities & Investment$149,100
Commercial Banks$113,300
Lawyers/Law Firms$79,500

2008

Breakdown of the source of Bachus' campaign funds before the 2008 election.

Bachus won re-election to the U.S. House in 2008. During that election cycle, Bachus' campaign committee raised a total of $1,460,646 and spent $1,414,799. The percentage of contributions from PACs was 61 percent, while individual contributions made up 36 percent.[73]

His top 5 contributors between 2007-2008 were:


2006

Breakdown of the source of Bachus' campaign funds before the 2006 election.

Bachus won re-election to the U.S. House in 2006. During that election cycle, Bachus' campaign committee raised a total of $1,638,815 and spent $1,893,917. The percentage of contributions from PACs was 63 percent, while individual contributions made up 26 percent.[74]

His top 5 contributors between 2005-2006 were:


2004

Breakdown of the source of Bachus' campaign funds before the 2004 election.

Bachus won re-election to the U.S. House in 2004. During that election cycle, Bachus' campaign committee raised a total of $1,647,636 and spent $1,376,103. The percentage of contributions from PACs was 53 percent, while individual contributions made up 39 percent.[75]

His top 5 contributors between 2003-2004 were:


2002

Breakdown of the source of Bachus' campaign funds before the 2002 election.

Bachus won re-election to the U.S. House in 2002. During that election cycle, Bachus' campaign committee raised a total of $1,105,801 and spent $747,977. The percentage of contributions from PACs was 60 percent, while individual contributions made up 31 percent.[76]

His top 5 contributors between 2001-2002 were:


2000

Bachus won re-election to the U.S. House in 2000. During that election cycle, Bachus' campaign committee raised a total of $672,429 and spent $577,565. The percentage of contributions from PACs was 52 percent, while individual contributions made up 40 percent.[77]

His top 5 contributors between 1999-2000 were:


PACs

Breakdown of the source of Bachus' campaign funds over the course of his career, as of February 22, 2012.

As of February 22, 2012, Bachus had raised $11,762,872 in his career in Congress. Of those funds, 40 percent ($4,691,857) came from individuals and 56 percent ($6,567,163) from PACs.[78]

Spencer Bachus' campaign contributions - PACs vs. Individuals
Year Amount from PACs Amount from Individuals
2009-2010 $1,021,400 (72%) $582,778 (41%)
2007-2008 $895,867 (35%) $521,439 (36%)
2005-2006 $1,028,133 (63%) $425,331 (26%)
2003-2004 $867,989 (53%) $637,879 (39%)
2001-2002 $662,086 (60%) $348,000 (31%)
1999-2000 $351,503 (52%) $226,008 (40%)
Career $6,567,163 (56%) $4,691,857 (40%)

Personal Gain Index

Congressional Personal Gain Index graphic.png
See also: Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress)

The Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress) is a four-part measurement that illustrates the extent to which members of the U.S. Congress have prospered during their tenure as public servants.
It consists of four different metrics:

PGI: Change in net worth

See also: Changes in Net Worth of U.S. Senators and Representatives (Personal Gain Index) and Net worth of United States Senators and Representatives
Net Worth Metric graphic.png

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Bachus' net worth as of 2012 was estimated between $168,016 and $1,094,998. That averages to $631,507, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican representatives in 2012 of $7,614,097.96. Bachus ranked as the 250th most wealthy representative in 2012.[79] Between 2004 and 2012, Bachus' calculated net worth[80] decreased by an average of 7 percent per year. Between 2004 and 2012, the average annual percentage increase for a member of Congress was 15.4 percent.[81]

Spencer Bachus Yearly Net Worth
YearAverage Net Worth
2004$1,317,535
2012$631,507
Growth from 2004 to 2012:-52%
Average annual growth:-7%[82]
Comparatively, the American citizen experienced a median yearly decline in net worth of -0.94%.[83]
The data used to calculate changes in net worth may include changes resulting from assets gained through marriage, inheritance, changes in family estates and/or trusts, changes in family business ownership and many other variables unrelated to a member's behavior in Congress.

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Bachus is a "rank-and-file Republican" as of July 2014. This was the same rating Bachus received in June 2013.[84]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[85]

Bachus most often votes with:

Bachus least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Bachus missed 523 of 14,503 roll call votes from January 1993 to July 2014. This amounts to 3.6 percent, which is worse than the median of 2.5 percent among current congressional representatives as of July 2014.[86]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Bachus paid his congressional staff a total of $998,407 in 2011. He ranked 194th on the list of the lowest paid Republican representative staff salaries and ranked 269th overall of the lowest paid representative staff salaries in 2011. Overall, Alabama ranked 22nd in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[87]

Staff bonuses

According to an analysis by CNN, Bachus was one of nearly 25 percent of House members who gave their staff bonuses in 2012. Bachus's staff was given an apparent $11,500.00 in bonus money.[88]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Click the link above for the full ratings of all members of Congress.

2013

Bachus ranked 193rd in the conservative rankings in 2013.[89]

2012

Bachus ranked 142nd in the conservative rankings in 2012.[90]

2011

Bachus ranked 186th in the conservative rankings in 2011.[91]

Voting with party

The website OpenCongress tracks how often members of Congress vote with the majority of the chamber caucus.

2014

Bachus voted with the Republican Party 92.5 percent of the time, which ranked 174th among the 234 House Republican members as of July 2014.[92]

2013

Bachus voted with the Republican Party 97.6 percent of the time, which ranked 84th among the 233 House Republican members as of June 2013.[93]

Personal

Bachus has a wife, Linda. He has three children and two stepchildren.

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a google news search for the term "Spencer + Bachus + Alabama + Congress" Spencer Bachus News Feed

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See also

External links

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Political Tracker has an article on:
Spencer Bachus


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 The Washington Post, "Spencer Bachus to not seek re-election," September 30, 2013
  2. The Birmingham News, "U.S. Rep. Spencer Bachus turns back three challengers in primary and wins without runoff," March 13, 2012
  3. Alabama Secretary of State, "Certification of Democratic Primary Candidates," accessed February 21, 2012
  4. ABC News, "2012 General Election Results," accessed November 6, 2012
  5. 5.0 5.1 Montgomery Advertiser, "Bachus re-election bid top US House race," March 5, 2012
  6. The Birmingham News, "Texas-based Super PAC Campaign for Primary Accountability targets US Rep. Spencer Bachus, backs challenger Scott Beason," February 15, 2012
  7. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, "Spencer T. Bachus, III," accessed October 28, 2011
  8. CQ.com - Roll Call, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress," accessed January 18, 2013
  9. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  10. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  11. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1960 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  12. Project Vote Smart, "HR 2217 - DHS Appropriations Act (2014) Act of 2014 - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  13. Project Vote Smart, "HR 624 - CISPA (2013) - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  14. Clerk of U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote 31: H.R. 2642," accessed February 12, 2014
  15. Politico, "House clears farm bill," accessed February 12, 2014
  16. 16.0 16.1 New York Times, "Senate passes long-stalled farm bill, with clear winners and losers," accessed February 12, 2014
  17. 17.0 17.1 CNN.com, "House passes compromise $1.1 trillion budget for 2014," accessed January 20, 2014
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote 21," accessed January 20, 2014
  19. Roll Call, "House passes $1.1 trillion omnibus," accessed January 20, 2014
  20. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  21. Buzzfeed, "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013
  22. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  23. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  24. U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013
  25. Project Vote Smart, "HR 273 - Eliminates the 2013 Statutory Pay Adjustment for Federal Employees - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  26. LA Times, "GOP rejects Dream Act-like deportation deferrals," accessed June 10, 2013
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 Huffington Post, "Steve King Amendment Passes House To Deport More Dreamers," accessed June 10, 2013
  28. Fox News, "House votes to resume deporting young DREAM Act immigrants," accessed June 10, 2013
  29. Huffington Post, "Steve King's Amendment To The Immigration Bill Worsens The GOP's Latino Problem," accessed June 10, 2013
  30. Project Vote Smart, "H Amdt 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  31. Project Vote Smart, "HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act - Voting Record," accessed September 16, 2013
  32. U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," accessed January 4, 2013
  33. 33.0 33.1 On The Issues, "Spencer Bachus Vote Match," accessed June 18, 2014
  34. The questions in the quiz are broken down into two sections -- social and economic. In social questions, liberals and libertarians agree in choosing the less-government answers, while conservatives and populists agree in choosing the more-restrictive answers. For the economic questions, conservatives and libertarians agree in choosing the less-government answers, while liberals and populists agree in choosing the more-restrictive answers.
  35. New York Times, "House Passes Bill Banning Insider Trading by Members of Congress," February 9, 2012
  36. 36.0 36.1 36.2 Washington Post, "Rep. Spencer Bachus faces insider-trading investigation," February 9, 2012
  37. New York Times, "Bachus Expects ‘Full Exoneration’ in Insider-Trading Inquiry," February 10, 2012
  38. ABC News, "Rep. Bachus Welcomes Ethics Probe to ‘Set Record Straight’," February 10, 2012
  39. ABC News, "2012 General Election Results," accessed November 6, 2012
  40. Birmingham News, "Alabama Campaign 2012: Two Democrats on ballot in Bachus' GOP-leaning district," March 5, 2012
  41. The Birmingham News, "Texas-based Super PAC Campaign for Primary Accountability targets US Rep. Spencer Bachus, backs challenger Scott Beason," February 15, 2012
  42. Campaign for Primary Accountability, "About," accessed February 2, 2012
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  44. Washington Post, "One super PAC takes aim at incumbents of any party," March 7, 2012
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  46. Chicago Tribune, "Powerful Alabama Congressman Bachus survives tough primary," March 14, 2012
  47. LA Times, "Alabama congressman wins primary despite 'super PAC' offensive," March 14, 2012
  48. ReElect Spencer Bachus, "National Right to Life Endorsement," February 10, 2012
  49. ReElect Spencer Bachus, "Business Council of Alabama Endorses Spencer Bachus," February 10, 2012
  50. ReElect Spencer Bachus, "Spencer Bachus announces REALTOR® support for U.S. House Re-election bid," February 10, 2012
  51. Birmingham News, "OUR VIEW: Spencer Bachus is the better choice for Republicans, and Penny Bailey is best for Democrats.," March 7, 2012
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  53. Birmingham News, "Sen. Jeff Sessions endorses Rep. Spencer Bachus," March 6, 2012
  54. ReElect Spencer Bachus, "Central Alabama Fire Chief's Association Endorses Bachus," March 7, 2012
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  56. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  57. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
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  80. This figure represents the total percentage growth from either 2004 (if the member entered office in 2004 or earlier) or their first year in office (as noted in the chart below).
  81. This number was found by dividing each member's total net worth growth percentage by the number of years included in the calculation.
  82. This figure represents the total percentage growth divided by the number of years for which there are net worth figures for each member.
  83. This figure was calculated using median asset data from the Census Bureau. Please see the Congressional Net Worth data for Ballotpedia spreadsheet for more information on this calculation.
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  91. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," accessed February 23, 2012
  92. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  93. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
Political offices
Preceded by
Ben Erdreich
U.S. House - Alabama District 6
1993-Present
Succeeded by
-