State legislative elections results, 2011

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: State legislative elections results analysis, 2011
SLP elec2011 badge.jpg
2011 State Legislative Elections

State Pages
Louisiana (S, H) • Mississippi (S, H) • New Jersey (S, H) • Virginia (S, H)
Overall Election Results

State-by-State Analysis
LouisianaMississippiNew JerseyVirginia

Other 2011 Election information
Primary electionsStatewide elections, 2011State Senate electionsState House electionsBallot MeasuresExecutive Officials Elections

There were 578 seats up for election in November of 2011. The main election date was November 8, 2011. However, Louisiana holds its elections on October 22 and November 19, 2011.

Results for primaries and the general election will be displayed as they become available.

November 19 Election results

There were 25 state legislative races in Louisiana on, November 19, 2011. The results did not affect partisan control, as the GOP clinched the majority in the State Senate and State House.

Senate

Democratic


  1. Gregory Tarver
  2. Troy Brown

Republican


  1. John R. Smith (Louisiana)
Louisiana State Senate
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 17 15
     Republican Party 22 24
Total 39 39

House

Democratic


  1. Alfred Williams
  2. Barbara Norton
  3. Ed Price
  4. Edward James
  5. Gene Reynolds
  6. Kenny Cox
  7. Marcus Hunter
  8. Randal Gaines
  9. Stephen Ortego
  10. Terry Landry
  11. Vincent Pierre

Republican


  1. Chris Broadwater
  2. Chris Leopold
  3. Clay Schexnayder
  4. Gregory Miller, Louisiana
  5. Jay Morris
  6. Kenny Havard
  7. Lenar Whitney
  8. Ray Garofalo
  9. Rob Shadoin

Third Party


  1. Terry Brown, Louisiana
Louisiana House of Representatives
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 46 45
     Republican Party 57 58
     Independent 2 2
Total 105 105

Partisan control

Heading into the 2011 elections, each political party controls 4 chambers with November elections.

Partisan Balance of Chambers with 2011 Elections
Legislative chamber Democratic Party Republican Party
State senates 2 2
State houses 2 2
Totals: 4 4

Of the 578 seats that were up for election, there were:

  • 287 Democratic legislators
  • 285 Republican legislators
  • 4 Independent legislators
  • 2 Vacancies

Thus, 49.7% of the seats were held by Democrats and 49.3% by Republicans.

Partisan breakdown of state legislators in the three states with elections on November 8, 2011
Before November 2011 election After November 2011 election
Party Senators Representatives Total state legislators Senators Representatives Total state legislators Gain/loss legislators
Democratic
70 154 224 64 138 202 -22
Republican
61 146 207 68 162 230 +23
Independent
0 2 2 0 1 1 -1
Vacancy
1 0 1 0 0 0 -1
Partisan breakdown of state legislators in Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia
Before November 2011 election After November 2011 election
Party Senators Representatives Total state legislators Senators Representatives Total state legislators Gain/loss legislators
Democratic
87 200 287 77 182 259 -23
Republican
83 202 285 92 221 313 +26
Independent or nonpartisan
0 4 4 0 3 3 -1
Vacancies
1 1 2 0 0 0 -2


General Election Results

[edit]

Partisan breakdown of state legislators in all 50 states
Before November 2011 election After November 2011 election
Party Senators Representatives Total state legislators Senators Representatives Total state legislators Gain/loss legislators
Democratic
879 2,454 3,333 875 2,439 3,310 -23
Republican
1,028 2,912 3,940 1,032 2,926 3,966 +26
Independent or nonpartisan
53 12 65 53 11 64 -1
Third-party and non-voting
2 9 11 2 9 11 0
Majority party before November 2011 Majority party after November 2011
State State Senate State House State Senate State House
Iowa[1]
Louisiana
Mississippi
New Jersey
Virginia[2]
  1. Control of the Iowa State Senate was decided in a special election.
  2. One race is expected to go to a recount. But presently, the Virginia State senate is tied 20-20. If that total remains, GOP would have control because the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia casts the tiebreaking vote.
Incumbents defeated in 2011 legislative elections
Party Senate House Total
Democratic

5

9

14
Republican 0

6

6

TOTALS

5

15 20
New Legislators after the 2011 legislative elections
Party Senate House Total
Democratic 9 32 41
Republican 27 66 93
TOTALS 36 98 134
Open Seat Winners in 2011 legislative elections
Party Senate House Total
Democratic 9 21 30
Republican 23 50 73
TOTALS 32 71 103

Oct. 22 Louisiana election update

State Senate

There were 4 undecided races in the Louisiana State Senate that were on the ballot in the November 19 runoff. Prior to the runoff, Democrats had won 12 seats while Republicans claimed 23 seats -- meaning the GOP was assured to retain the majority in the chamber. There were four undecided races. They were:

Thus, of the four races, three were assured to be won by Democrats and one by the GOP.

The result of the 2011 elections in Louisiana is that the partisan control will be in the Republicans favor, 24-15, for a Republican gain of 2 seats.

State House

There were 21 undecided races in the Louisiana House of Representatives that were on the ballot in the November 19 runoff. Prior to the runoff, Democrats had won 35 seats while Republicans claimed 49 seats -- meaning the GOP was assured to retain the majority in the chamber. There were still 21 undecided races. They were:

Thus, of the 21 races, six were assured to be won by Democrats and five by the GOP.

Senate

The following candidates won election to the Louisiana State Senate during the October 22 primary. Because these candidates received more than 50 percent of the vote, they were declared official winners of the race and will be sworn into the Senate in January 2012.

Democratic

Republican

Louisiana State Senate
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 17 15
     Republican Party 22 24
Total 39 39

House

The following candidates won election to the Louisiana House of Representatives during the October 22 primary. Because these candidates received more than 50 percent of the vote, they were declared official winners of the race and will be sworn into the House in January 2012.

Democratic

Republican


  1. Alan Seabaugh
  2. Anthony Ligi
  3. Bob Hensgens
  4. Brett Geymann
  5. Bryan Adams
  6. Cameron Henry
  7. Charles Chaney
  8. Charles Kleckley
  9. Chris Broadwater
  10. Chris Leopold
  11. Clay Schexnayder
  12. Clifton Richardson
  13. Eddie Lambert
  14. Erich Ponti
  15. Frank Hoffmann
  16. Frank Howard (Louisiana)
  17. Franklin Foil
  18. George Cromer
  19. Gordon Dove
  20. Gregory Miller, Louisiana
  21. Henry Burns
  22. Hunter Greene
  23. J. Rogers Pope
  24. James Fannin
  25. James Morris, Louisiana Representative
  26. Jay Morris
  27. Jeff Thompson
  28. Joe Harrison
  29. Joel Robideaux
  30. John Berthelot
  31. John Guinn
  32. John Schroder
  33. Joseph Lopinto
  34. Kenny Havard
  35. Kevin Pearson
  36. Kirk Talbot
  37. Lance Harris
  38. Lenar Whitney
  39. Lowell Hazel
  40. Mike "Pete" Huval
  41. Nancy Landry
  42. Nicholas Lorusso
  43. Patrick Connick
  44. Paul Hollis
  45. Ray Garofalo
  46. Richard Burford
  47. Rob Shadoin
  48. Scott Simon
  49. Sherman Mack
  50. Simone Champagne
  51. Stephen Carter
  52. Stephen Pugh
  53. Steven Pylant
  54. Stuart Bishop
  55. Taylor Barras
  56. Thomas Carmody, Jr.
  57. Timothy Burns
  58. Tom Willmott
  59. Valarie Hodges

Independent

Louisiana House of Representatives
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 46 45
     Republican Party 57 58
     Independent 2 2
Total 105 105

Senate

The following candidates won election to the Mississippi State Senate during the November 8 election.

Democratic

Republican

Mississippi State Senate
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 24 21
     Republican Party 27 31
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 52 52

House

The following candidates won election to the Mississippi House of Representatives during the November 8 election.

Democratic


  1. Adrienne Wooten
  2. Alyce Clarke
  3. America Chuck Middleton
  4. Angela Cockerham
  5. Bennett Malone
  6. Billy Broomfield
  7. Blaine Eaton, II
  8. Bob Evans
  9. Bobby Moak
  10. Brad Oberhousen
  11. Bryant Clark
  12. Cecil Brown
  13. Charles Young
  14. Chuck Espy
  15. Clara Burnett
  16. Credell Calhoun
  17. David Baria
  18. David Gibbs
  19. David Myers, Mississippi Representative
  20. Deborah Butler Dixon
  21. Donnie Bell
  22. Earle Banks
  23. Edward Blackmon, Jr.
  24. Esther Harrison
  25. Ferr Smith
  26. George Flaggs, Jr.
  27. Gregory Holloway, Sr.
  28. James Evans
  29. Jody Steverson
  30. Joe Gardner
  31. John Hines, Mississippi Representative
  32. Johnny Stringer
  33. Joseph Warren
  34. Kelvin Buck
  35. Kevin Horan
  36. Kimberly Campbell Buck
  37. Linda Coleman, Mississippi Representative
  38. Linda Whittington
  39. Mary Coleman
  40. Michael Evans
  41. Nick Bain
  42. Omeria Scott
  43. Percy Watson
  44. Preston Sullivan
  45. Randall Patterson
  46. Reecy Dickson
  47. Robert Huddleston
  48. Robert Johnson, III
  49. Rufus Straughter
  50. Sara Thomas
  51. Sherra Lane
  52. Sonya Williams-Barnes
  53. Steve Holland
  54. Thomas Reynolds, II
  55. Tom Miles
  56. Tyrone Ellis
  57. Willie Bailey
  58. Willie Perkins, Sr.

Republican


  1. Alex Monsour
  2. Andy Gipson
  3. Becky Currie
  4. Bill Denny
  5. Bill Pigott
  6. Bobby Howell
  7. Bobby Shows
  8. Brad Mayo
  9. Brian Aldridge
  10. C. Scott Bounds
  11. Carolyn Crawford
  12. Casey Eure
  13. Charles Busby
  14. Chris Brown (Mississippi)
  15. Dennis DeBar
  16. Doug McLeod
  17. Eugene Forrest Hamilton
  18. Gary Chism
  19. Gary Staples
  20. Gene Alday
  21. Greg Haney
  22. Greg Snowden
  23. Hank Lott
  24. Henry Zuber, III
  25. Herb Frierson
  26. Jason White (Mississippi)
  27. Jeff Smith (Mississippi)
  28. Jeffrey S. Guice
  29. Jerry Turner
  30. Jessica Upshaw
  31. Jim Beckett
  32. Joey Hood
  33. John Moore (Mississippi)
  34. John Read
  35. Ken Morgan
  36. Kevin McGee
  37. Larry Byrd
  38. Lester Carpenter
  39. Mac Huddleston
  40. Manly Barton
  41. Margaret Rogers
  42. Mark Baker (Mississippi)
  43. Mark Formby
  44. Nolan Mettetal
  45. Pat Nelson
  46. Philip Gunn
  47. Randy Boyd
  48. Randy Rushing
  49. Ray Rogers
  50. Richard Bennett
  51. Rita Martinson
  52. Sam Mims, V
  53. Scott DeLano
  54. Steve Horne
  55. Steve Massengill
  56. Thomas Weathersby, Sr.
  57. Thomas Woods
  58. Timmy Ladner
  59. Toby Barker
  60. Tommy Taylor
  61. Trey Lamar
  62. Wanda Jennings
  63. William Arnold
  64. William Shirley

Independent


None

Mississippi House of Representatives
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 68 59
     Republican Party 54 63
Total 122 122


According to a Wall Street Journal analysis of unofficial county results, New Jersey voters set a new record low turnout of roughly 26%. Only 1.4 million of the state's 5.2 million registered voters actually cast a ballot. The previous record was 31% in 1999.[1]

Senate

The following candidates won election to the New Jersey State Senate during the November 8 election.

Democratic

Republican

New Jersey State Senate
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 24 24
     Republican Party 16 16
Total 40 40

House

The following candidates won election to the New Jersey General Assembly during the November 8 election.

Democratic

Republican

Independent


Results will be posted after polls close.

New Jersey General Assembly
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 47 48
     Republican Party 33 32
Total 80 80

Senate

The following candidates won election to the Virginia State Senate during the November 8 election.

Democratic

Republican

Note: The race between Bryce Reeves (R) and incumbent R. Edward "Edd" Houck may go to a recount because the difference is less than 1%. In Virginia, there are no automatic recounts but the loser can request a recount.[2]
  1. Control of the Iowa State Senate was decided in a special election.
  2. One race is expected to go to a recount. But presently, the Virginia State senate is tied 20-20. If that total remains, GOP would have control because the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia casts the tiebreaking vote.
Virginia State Senate
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 22 20
     Republican Party 18 20
Total 40 40

House

The following candidates won election to the Virginia House of Delegates during the November 8 election.

Democratic

Republican


  1. Anne B. Crockett-Stark
  2. Barbara Comstock
  3. Barry Knight
  4. Ben Cline
  5. Beverly Sherwood
  6. Bill Howell
  7. Bob Marshall, Virginia Representative
  8. Bob Purkey
  9. Bob Tata
  10. Bobby Orrock
  11. Brenda Pogge
  12. C. Todd Gilbert
  13. Charles Poindexter
  14. Chris Head
  15. Chris Jones
  16. Chris Peace
  17. Christopher Stolle
  18. Danny Marshall, III
  19. Dave Albo
  20. David Ramadan
  21. David Yancey
  22. Donald Merricks
  23. Ed Scott
  24. Gordon Helsel
  25. Greg Habeeb
  26. Israel O'Quinn
  27. Jackson H. Miller
  28. James Edmunds, II
  29. James LeMunyon
  30. James Morefield
  31. Jimmie Massie
  32. John Cosgrove
  33. John Cox (Virginia)
  34. John O'Bannon
  35. Joseph Yost
  36. Kathy Byron
  37. Keith Hodges
  38. Kirk Cox
  39. Larry Rush
  40. Lee Ware
  41. Manoli Loupassi
  42. Margaret Ransone
  43. Mark Cole
  44. Mark Dudenhefer
  45. Matt Fariss
  46. Michael Watson (Virginia)
  47. Michael Webert
  48. Peter Farrell
  49. Randall Minchew
  50. Richard Anderson (Virginia)
  51. Richard Bell, Virginia legislator
  52. Rick Morris
  53. Riley Ingram
  54. Rob Bell
  55. Ronald Villanueva
  56. Roxann Robinson
  57. Salvatore Iaquinto
  58. Scott Lingamfelter
  59. Steve Landes
  60. T. Scott Garrett
  61. Terry Kilgore
  62. Thomas Greason
  63. Tim Hugo
  64. Tom Rust
  65. Tommy Wright
  66. Tony Wilt

Independent

Virginia House of Delegates
Party As of November 2011 After the 2011 Election
     Democratic Party 39 32
     Republican Party 58 67
     Independent 2 1
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 100 100






External links

References

  1. Control of the Iowa State Senate was decided in a special election.
  2. One race is expected to go to a recount. But presently, the Virginia State senate is tied 20-20. If that total remains, GOP would have control because the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia casts the tiebreaking vote.

See also


Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found