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State legislative historical elections by state

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This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were elected for three years, one third annually, until 1846 when the term was increased to four years, one half every second year. Since 1902 the entire Senate has been elected at the same time. The House was elected annually until 1845 when the term was increased to two years. In 1902 the term was increased again, this time to four years.[1]

2014

2010

Total raised by Senate candidates: $24,953,102[2]
Total raised by House candidates: $19,792,124[2]

2006

Total raised by Senate candidates: $24,792,035[3]
Total raised by House candidates: $17,109,524[3]

2002

Total raised by Senate candidates: $15,536,155[4]
Total raised by House candidates: $12,397,003[4]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators have been elected since statehood for four year terms; terms overlap, with one-half of the Senate elected every two years. All are elected at the same time when a new apportionment occurs. Representatives serve a term of two years.[1]

2014

2012

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,926,167[5]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,292,420[5]

2010

Total raised by Senate candidates: $1,227,692[6]
Total raised by House candidates: $2,751,725[6]

2008

Total raised by Senate candidates: $863,330[7]
Total raised by House candidates: $2,919,909[7]

2006

Total raised by Senate candidates: $1,560,798[8]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,973,988[8]

2004

Total raised by Senate candidates: $1,867,581[9]
Total raised by House candidates: $4,077,001[9]

2002

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,196,193[10]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,385,516[10]

2000

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,116,496[11]
Total raised by House candidates: $2,737,767[11]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Members of both houses have always been elected for two years.[1]

2014

2012

Total raised by Senate candidates: $3,173,022[12]
Total raised by House candidates: $4,157,517[12]

2010

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,954,399[13]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,311,375[13]

2008

Total raised by Senate candidates: $3,185,493[14]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,531,238[14]

2006

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,571,504[15]
Total raised by House candidates: $4,354,506[15]

2004

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,274,490[16]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,816,633[16]

2002

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,149,412[17]
Total raised by House candidates: $$4,079,565[17]

2000

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,127,230[18]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,918,039[18]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators have always been elected for four-year terms; terms overlap so that one-half the Senate is elected every two years. Representatives have always been elected for a term of two years.[1]

2014

2012

Total raised by Senate candidates: $6,948,813[19]
Total raised by House candidates: $6,494,694[19]

2010

Total raised by Senate candidates: $3,771,126[20]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,568,914[20]

2008

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,251,735[21]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,071,811[21]

2006

Total raised by Senate candidates: $1,546,556[22]
Total raised by House candidates: $4,666,062[22]

2004

Total raised by Senate candidates: $1,250,204[23]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,956,366[23]

2002

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,693,862[24]
Total raised by House candidates: $2,775,317[24]

2000

Total raised by Senate candidates: $1,866,727[25]
Total raised by House candidates: $2,748,032[25]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were initially elected for a term of two years, with overlapping terms so that half the body was elected annually. Effective in 1863 the term was increased to four years, half the body every two years. Assemblymen were elected annually until 1863 when the term was increased to two years.[1]

2014

2012

Total raised by Senate candidates: $31,585,423[26]
Total raised by Assembly candidates: $86,572,280[26]

2010

Total raised by Senate candidates: $23,013,311[27]
Total raised by Assembly candidates: $77,436,989[27]

2008

Total raised by Senate candidates: $35,170,551[28]
Total raised by Assembly candidates: $84,390,298[28]

2006

Total raised by Senate candidates: $30,011,241[29]
Total raised by Assembly candidates: $91,726,959[29]

2004

Total raised by Senate candidates: $32,887,100[30]
Total raised by Assembly candidates: $94,287,806[30]

2002

Total raised by Senate candidates: $22,148,467[31]
Total raised by Assembly candidates: $73,822,064[31]

2000

Total raised by Senate candidates: $31,585,423[32]
Total raised by Assembly candidates: $86,572,280[32]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators have been elected for a term of four years, with overlapping terms (one-half elected every two years). the House of Representatives is elected for a term of two years.[1]

2014

2012

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,880,286[33]
Total raised by House candidates: $6,063,822[33]

2010

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,498,355[34]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,085,353[34]

2008

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,535,787[35]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,818,170[35]

2006

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,935,888[36]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,204,618[36]

2004

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,050,430[37]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,743,809[37]

2002

Total raised by Senate candidates: $4,313,640[38]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,389,097[38]

2000

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,529,297[39]
Total raised by House candidates: $2,907,100[39]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The upper house -- called the Assistants until 1819, when it was changed to the Senate -- served a one-year term. This was increased to two years in 1876, with one-half the body elected annually. Beginning in 1886 all senators were elected at the same time. The lower house, the Assembly, was elected for six months until 1819 when the term was made one year. It became two years in 1886.[1]

2014

2012

Total raised by Senate candidates: $6,163,101[40]
Total raised by House candidates: $7,132,351[40]

2010

Total raised by Senate candidates: $5,093,702[41]
Total raised by House candidates: $7,031,683[41]

2008

Total raised by Senate candidates: $5,410,734[42]
Total raised by House candidates: $5,657,925[42]

2006

Total raised by Senate candidates: $4,431,204[43]
Total raised by House candidates: $4,878,009[43]

2004

Total raised by Senate candidates: $4,416,892[44]
Total raised by House candidates: $4,776,294[44]

2002

Total raised by Senate candidates: $3,700,656[45]
Total raised by House candidates: $4,749,372[45]

2000

Total raised by Senate candidates: $2,866,237[46]
Total raised by House candidates: $3,937,787[46]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The Legislative Council, as the upper house was originally called, was elected for a term of three years until 1832 when it was increased to four years, the present length of service. The Assembly -- the name initially given to the other house -- was elected annually until 1832 when the term became two years, which it has remained ever since. The legislative chambers took their present names, Senate and House of Representatives, in 1792.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Members of the unicameral legislature served a one-year term. When a bicameral legislature was established in 1789, the House of Representatives, as the lower house was called, was also elected for a one-year term. the term was changed to its present length of two years in 1843. Senators (the Senate was established by the constitution of 1789) served a three-year term, reduced to one year in 1795 but increased to four years by the constitution in 1868. The constitution of 1877 established the present term of two years.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were elected for a term of four years until 1872; with overlapping terms, one-half the body was elected every two years. In 1872 senators were divided into three classes with two out of three elections for a four-year term and one for a two-year term. At the beginning of a new apportionment cycle all senators are elected. Thereafter one-third and then two-thirds of the Senate are elected followed by two-thirds and one-third again. However, in 1966 all senators were elected for four years. House members have always served a term of two years.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Under the 1816 constitution, senators were elected for a three-year term; one-third of the body was elected each year. Under the 1851 constitution the term was increased to four years, with one-half elected every two years; this is the present procedure. The House was at first elected annually, but terms were increased to two years by the 1851 constitution.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators since statehood have been elected for a term of four years. Initially they served overlapping terms, one-half the body elected every two years. Since 1880 they have all been elected at the same time. The House was initially elected for two years, increased to four years in 1880.[1]

2011

2007

2003

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were initially indirectly elected for five years. The term was increased to six years in 1838, with one-third of the body up for election every two years. In 1850 the term was set at four years, the present length, one-half the body every two years, until 1926 when all legislators were elected at the same time for four years.
Members of the House of Delegates were elected annually until 1847 when the term was increased to two years. Effective with the election of 1926 the term became four years, as it remains today.[1]

2014

2010

2006

2002

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were originally elected for two years; terms overlapped, with one-half the body elected every year until 1852 when rules were changed so that all were elected at the same time. The term was increased to four years in 1966; again, all senators are elected at the same election. House members were elected annually until 1850 when the term was increased to two years. Members elected in 1850 carried over until 1852.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were at first elected for three years, with one-third of the body elected each year. in 1832 the term was increased to four years, one-half the body every two years. Since 1890 all senators have been elected at the same time. House members were elected annually under the original constitution. The term was increased to two years in 1832 and four years in 1890.[1]

2011

2007

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Members of both houses were elected for a term of two years. With the institution of the unicameral legislature in 1936, all members are elected for four years, with one-half the body elected every two years.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Members of the Council, which later became the Senate, were elected for a term of one year. In 1844 the state's second constitution provided for a three-year term, with overlap so that one-third of the body was elected annually. In 1947 the term was increased to four years, the present length. Assemblymen were elected for a one-year term until 1947 when the term was increased to its present length, two years. New Jersey was the last state to have a one-year legislative term.[1]

2013

2011

2009

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators since statehood have been elected for four years, all at the same time, except on two occasions when reapportionment required another election at the two-year mark. The extra elections were held in 1966 and 1976. Representatives since statehood have been elected for a term of two years.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were elected for a four-year term until 18747, when the present term of two years was initiated. The Assembly was elected annually until 1938 when the term was increased to two years, the present length of service. New York was the next to last state to elect their lower house for a term of one year. New Jersey continued to do so until 1947.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators were originally elected for two years; one-half the body was elected annually. Beginning in 1851 all Senators were elected at the same election. A 1956 amendment increased the term to four years, with one-half elected every two years. The House was initially elected for a one-year term, which was increased to two years by the 1850 constitution. All legislators selected in 1905 served a three-year term to permit future elections to be held in even-numbered years.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The 1776 constitution created a unicameral legislature called a House of Representatives. The term was one year: in 1874 it was increased to its present length, two years. Meanwhile, in 1790 a second constitution created the Senate. Members of this body were elected for four years. The term was reduced to three years by the constitutional convention of 1837. The four-year term was restored in 1874 by another convention and this has been the term every since.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Members of the Senate -- under the short-live 1776 constitution called the Legislative Council -- were elected by and from the General Assembly for two years. The Senate created by the constitution of 1778 was elected for a term of two years. The term was increased to four years, one-half the body elected every two years, beginning in 1868. This is the term today, but since 1972 all Senators have been elected at the same time.[1]

2014

2012

2010

2008

2006

2004

2002

2000

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Senators have always been elected for a term of four years; initially one-fourth of the body was elected annually. Beginning in 1851 one-half of the Senate was chosen every second year. Since 1903 all Senators have been elected at the same time. The House of Delegates was originally elected for a one-year term, increased to two years in 1851. This is the current term.[1]

2013

2011

2009

2007

See also

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26 1.27 1.28 1.29 1.30 1.31 1.32 1.33 1.34 1.35 1.36 1.37 1.38 1.39 1.40 1.41 1.42 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.47 1.48 1.49 Dubin, M. J. (2007). Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures: A Year by Year Summary, 1796-2006. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc."
  2. 2.0 2.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2010 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  3. 3.0 3.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2006 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  4. 4.0 4.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2002 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  5. 5.0 5.1 followthemoney.org, "Alaska 2012 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  6. 6.0 6.1 followthemoney.org, "Alaska 2010 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  7. 7.0 7.1 followthemoney.org, "Alaska 2008 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  8. 8.0 8.1 followthemoney.org, "Alaska 2006 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  9. 9.0 9.1 followthemoney.org, "Alaska 2004 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  10. 10.0 10.1 followthemoney.org, "Alaska 2002 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  11. 11.0 11.1 followthemoney.org, "Alaska 2000 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  12. 12.0 12.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2012 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  13. 13.0 13.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2010 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  14. 14.0 14.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2008 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  15. 15.0 15.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2006 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  16. 16.0 16.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2004 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  17. 17.0 17.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2002 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  18. 18.0 18.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2000 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  19. 19.0 19.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2012 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  20. 20.0 20.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2010 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  21. 21.0 21.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2008 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  22. 22.0 22.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2006 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  23. 23.0 23.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2004 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  24. 24.0 24.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2002 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  25. 25.0 25.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2000 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  26. 26.0 26.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2012 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  27. 27.0 27.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2010 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  28. 28.0 28.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2008 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  29. 29.0 29.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2006 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  30. 30.0 30.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2004 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  31. 31.0 31.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2002 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  32. 32.0 32.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2000 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  33. 33.0 33.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2012 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  34. 34.0 34.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2010 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  35. 35.0 35.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2008 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  36. 36.0 36.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2006 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  37. 37.0 37.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2004 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  38. 38.0 38.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2002 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  39. 39.0 39.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2000 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  40. 40.0 40.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2012 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  41. 41.0 41.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2010 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  42. 42.0 42.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2008 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  43. 43.0 43.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2006 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  44. 44.0 44.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2004 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  45. 45.0 45.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2002 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013
  46. 46.0 46.1 followthemoney.org, "Alabama 2000 Candidates," Accessed September 3, 2013