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Tennessee elections, 2012

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2013
Contents
1 2012 Elections
2 Eligibility to Vote
2.1 Primary election
2.2 General election
3 Voting absentee
3.1 Eligibility
3.2 Deadlines
3.3 Military and overseas voting
4 Voting early
5 See also
6 References

The state of Tennessee held elections in 2012. Below are the dates of note:

On the 2012 ballot Click here for all
November 6, 2012
Election Results
U.S. Senate (1 seat) Approveda Preview Article
U.S. House (9 seats) Approveda
State Executives Defeatedd N/A
State Senate (16 seats) Approveda Preview Article
State House (99 seats) Approveda
Ballot measures (

0 measures)

Defeatedd N/A

2012 Elections

Note: Election information listed on this page does not pertain to 2012 presidential elections. For more about Ballotpedia's areas of coverage, click here.
For election results in the 50 states, see our November 6, 2012 election results page

Elections by type

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See also: United States Senate elections in Tennessee, 2012
U.S. Senate, Tennessee General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngBob Corker Incumbent 64.9% 1,506,443
     Democratic Mark E. Clayton 30.4% 705,882
     Constitution Kermit Steck 0.8% 18,620
     Green Martin Pleasant 1.7% 38,472
     Libertarian Shaun E. Crowell 0.9% 20,936
     Independent David Gatchell 0.3% 6,523
     Independent Michael Joseph Long 0.3% 8,085
     Independent Troy Stephen Scoggin 0.3% 8,080
Total Votes 2,320,189
Source: Tennessee Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

See also: Tennessee State Senate elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state senate.

Tennessee State Senate
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 13 7
     Republican Party 20 26
Total 33 33


See also: Tennessee House of Representatives elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state house.

Tennessee House of Representatives
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 34 27
     Republican Party 64 71
     Independent 0 1
     Vacancy 1 0
Total 99 99

Eligibility to Vote

Tennessee

Primary election

See also: Voting in the 2012 primary elections

Tennessee is one of 16 states to use an open primary system. Voters were required to register to vote in the primary by July 3, 2012, which is 30 days before the primary took place.[1] (Information about registering to vote)

General election

See also: Voting in the 2012 general elections

The deadline to register to vote is 29 days prior to the election day, which in 2012 was October 8.[2]

Voting absentee

AbsenteeMap.png
See also: Absentee Voting

Eligibility

Voters are eligible to vote absentee in an election if they cannot make it to the polls on Election Day for one of the following reasons:[4]

  • The voter will be outside the county of registration during the early voting period and all day on Election Day;
  • The voter or the voter’s spouse is enrolled as a full-time student in an accredited college or university outside the county of registration;
  • The voter’s licensed physician has filed a statement with the county election commission stating that, in the physician's judgment, the voter is medically unable to vote in person. The statement must be filed not less than seven (7) days before the election and signed under the penalty of perjury;
  • The voter resides in a licensed facility providing relatively permanent domiciliary care, other than a penal institution, outside the voter's county of residence;
  • The voter will be unable to vote in person due to service as a juror for a federal or state court;
  • The voter is sixty (60) years of age or older;
  • The voter has a physical disability and an inaccessible polling place;
  • The voter is hospitalized, ill, or physically disabled and because of such condition, cannot vote in person;
  • The voter is a caretaker of a person who is hospitalized, ill, or disabled;
  • The voter is a candidate for office in the election;
  • The voter serves as an Election Day official or as a member or employee of the election commission;
  • The voter’s observance of a religious holiday prevents him or her from voting in person during the early voting period and on Election Day;
  • The voter or the voter’s spouse possesses a valid commercial drivers license (CDL) or the voter possesses a valid Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) card and certifies that he or she will be working outside the state or county of registration during the open hours of early voting and Election Day, and has no specific out-of-county or out-of-state address to which mail may be sent or received during such time;
  • The voter is a member of the military or is an overseas citizen.

Deadlines

To vote absentee a request must be received by the county election commission no earlier than 90 days and no later than seven days prior to the election. The ballot must then be returned by close of polls on Election Day.[4]

Military and overseas voting

For full details, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program here.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Tennessee is one of 34 states that has early voting with no specific requirements as to who can vote early. Early voting begins 20 days before Election Day and ends five days prior.[5] The average number of days prior to an election that voters can cast an early ballot is 21 days in states with a definitive starting date.

See also

References