Vote button trans.png
April's Project of the Month
It's spring time. It's primary election season!
Click here to find all the information you'll need to cast your ballot.




Texas' 16th Congressional District elections, 2012

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2014



CongressLogo.png

Texas' 16th Congressional District

General Election Date
November 6, 2012

Primary Date
May 29, 2012

November 6 Election Winner:
Beto O'Rourke Democratic Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Silvestre Reyes Democratic Party
Silvestre Reyes.jpg

Texas U.S. House Elections
District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14District 15District 16District 17District 18District 19District 20District 21District 22District 23District 24District 25District 26District 27District 28District 29District 30District 31District 32District 33District 34District 35District 36

2012 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Texas.png
The 16th Congressional District of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.

Beto O'Rourke (D) was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.[1]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
March 9, 2012
May 29, 2012
November 6, 2012

Primary: Texas has an open primary system, in which any registered voter can choose which party's primary to vote in, without having to be a member of that party. Texas also scheduled a primary runoff for July 31, 2012.

Voter registration: Voters had to register to vote in the primary by April 30.[2] For the July 31, 2012, the vote registration deadline was July 2. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 9.[3]

See also: Texas elections, 2012

Incumbent: Heading into the election the incumbent was Silvestre Reyes (D), who was first elected in 1996.

This was the first election using new district maps based on 2010 Census data. Texas' 16th Congressional District was located in the far western portion of the state, and included part of El Paso county.[4]

* Redistricting note: Due to legal turmoil in the redistricting process, filing deadlines were changed twice and the primary was changed once. The original filing deadline was December 12th.[5] That deadline was first moved to December 15th and then December 19th by a federal court due to delays caused by redistricting legal challenges. When a final map was issued, the December 19th deadline was once again moved to March 9 to allow candidates more time to file in light of the delays and map ambiguities. The primary date was first moved from March 6 to April 3, 2012 before finally settling on May 29.[6]

Candidates

General election candidates

Democratic Party Beto O'RourkeGreen check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Barbara Carrasco
Libertarian Party Junart Sodoy


May 29, 2012, primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

Libertarian Party Libertarian Convention

Independent Independent candidates

Election results

General election

U.S. House, Texas District 16 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngBeto O'Rourke 65.4% 101,403
     Republican Barbara Carrasco 32.9% 51,043
     Libertarian Junart Sodoy 1.7% 2,559
Total Votes 155,005
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Race background

According to Politico, Beto O'Rourke presented Reyes' first real primary threat since the incumbent was elected. O'Rourke portrayed Reyes as unresponsive and entrenched; the challenger also raised significant funding and received support from the Campaign for Primary Accountability. Reyes responded by gathering endorsements from Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, as well as pointing out O'Rourke's support of marijuana legalization.[9]

According to an article from The Washington Post, published on March 30, 2012, that noted the top 10 incumbents who could lose their primaries, Reyes was the 2nd most likely incumbent to lose his primary.[10] Competition in the primary from former El Paso City Councilman Beto O'Rourke and being targeted by the Campaign for Primary Accountability were the main reasons for his vulnerability.[10] The article even went so far as to state, "Reyes may be the Democrat most likely to lose his primary."[10]

Impact of redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas' 16th Congressional District was largely unaffected by the redistricting process. The district now extends all the way east to Hudspeth County, but it lost some area in southern El Paso County. The district remained centered around El Paso and largely Democratic, although it increased in population somewhat.

The 16th District was re-drawn after the 2010 Census. The new district is composed of the following percentages of voters of the old congressional districts.[11][12]

District partisanship

FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

See also: FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

In 2012, FairVote did a study on partisanship in the congressional districts, giving each a percentage ranking (D/R) based on the new 2012 maps and comparing that to the old 2010 maps. Texas' 16th District became more Republican as a result of redistricting.[13]

  • 2012: 61D / 39R
  • 2010: 62D / 38R

Cook Political Report's PVI

See also: Cook Political Report's Partisan Voter Index

In 2012, Cook Political Report released its updated figures on the Partisan Voter Index, which measures each congressional district's partisanship relative to the rest of the country. Texas' 16th Congressional District has a PVI of D+9, which is the 112th most Democratic district in the country. In 2008, this district was won by Barack Obama (D), 65-35 percent over John McCain (R). In 2004, John Kerry (D) won the district 55-45 percent over George W. Bush.[14]

The 16th Congressional District of Texas, after redistricting.

The 16th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.









Campaign issues

  • Marijuana legalization

Reyes staunchly opposed the legalization of marijuana. He stated "My opponent seems to think that recreational use of marijuana is okay with him, and that's the group he hangs around with -- but it's not for me, it's not for my grandkids." He also added, "I don't want to live in a community where people think that it's okay to light up a joint and parade around elementary schools and junior highs."[15]

O'Rourke on the other hand advocated legalization of marijuana as a means to gather revenue and more importantly, to hurt the drug cartels. He stated that despite attacks, he is "not backing off my position. I have the courage of my conviction. It is clear to me that what we're doing is a failure." He added, "You have 10,000 people killed in the most brutal fashion in Ciudad Juarez (Mexico) in the last 10 years, without a single word from the congressman about what we can do to change the dynamic and stop the bloodshed." Marijuana is "the cornerstone of the cartel economy."[15]

Campaign finance

As of March 31, 2012, Reyes had a significant advantage over O'Rourke in fundraising, having raised $915,378 to O'Rourke's $379,296. The data also showed that Barbara Carrasco had raised $74,301.[16]

Of the money raised by Reyes, roughly half of it came from PAC contributions, while the other half was from individual contributors. In contrast, 97% of the funds raised by O'Rourke came from individual contributions. Carrasco's campaign was largely self-financed.[16]

Silvestre Reyes
Reyes Finance.PNG

Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke Finance.PNG

Barbara Carrasco
Carrasco Finance.PNG

PAC targeting

Incumbent Silvestre Reyes was targeted by the Super PAC Campaign for Primary Accountability in the 16th District Democratic primary. The PAC targeted Reyes because he had served for a long time, his constituents were dissatisfied, and there was a capable challenger.[17]

A Reyes spokesperson criticized the Campaign for Primary Accountability's implicit support of primary Reyes challenger Beto O'Rourke, pointing out that Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor had contributed to the PAC for its efforts in a Republican primary in Illinois.[18]

Campaign contributions

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2012 elections season. Below are candidate reports.

Beto O'Rourke

Beto O'Rourke (2012) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[19]April 15, 2012$188,319.27$130,119.79$(95,874.93)$222,564.13
Pre-Primary[20]May 17, 2012$222,564.13$22,322.66$(184,341.25)$60,545.54
Running totals
$152,442.45$(280,216.18)

Barbara Carrasco

Barbara Carrasco (2012) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[21]April 13, 2012$51,111.81$9,836$(8,076.49)$52,871.32
Pre-Primary[22]May 16, 2012$52,871.32$1,375$(1,442.79)$52,803.53
Running totals
$11,211$(9,519.28)

District history

Candidate Ballot Access
Ballot Access Requirements Final.jpg

Find detailed information on ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington D.C.

2010

On November 2, 2010, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating Tim Besco (R), Bill Collins (L), and Tim Collins (Write-in).[23]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Texas Congressional District 16, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes Incumbent 58.1% 49,301
     Republican Tim Besco 36.6% 31,051
     Libertarian Bill Collins 5.1% 4,319
     Write-in Tim Collins 0.3% 221
Total Votes 84,892

2008

On November 4, 2008, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating Ben Mendoza (I) and Mette Baker (L).[24]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Texas Congressional District 16, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes Incumbent 82.1% 130,375
     Independent Ben Mendoza 10.3% 16,348
     Libertarian Mette Baker 7.6% 12,000
Total Votes 158,723

2006

On November 7, 2006, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating Gordon Strickland (L).[25]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Texas Congressional District 16, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes Incumbent 78.7% 61,116
     Libertarian Gordon Strickland 21.3% 16,572
Total Votes 77,688

2004

On November 2, 2004, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating David Brigham (R) and Brad Clardy (L) .[26]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Texas Congressional District 16, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes Incumbent 67.5% 108,577
     Republican David Brigham 31.1% 49,972
     Libertarian Brad Clardy 1.4% 2,224
Total Votes 160,773

2002

On November 5, 2002, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, running unopposed.[27]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Texas Congressional District 16, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes Incumbent 100% 72,383
Total Votes 72,383

2000

On November 7, 2000, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating Daniel Power (R) and Dan Moser (L).[28]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Texas Congressional District 16, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes Incumbent 68.3% 92,649
     Republican Daniel Power 30.2% 40,921
     Libertarian Dan Moser 1.5% 2,080
Total Votes 135,650

1998

On November 3, 1998, Silvestre Reyes won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating Stu Nance (L) and Lorenzo Morales (I).[29]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Texas Congressional District 16, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngSilvestre Reyes Incumbent 87.9% 67,486
     Libertarian Stu Nance 6.9% 5,329
     Independent Lorenzo Morales 5.1% 3,952
Total Votes 76,767

See also

External links

References

  1. ABC News, "2012 General Election Results," accessed November 6, 2012
  2. Texas Secretary of State "2012 Primary Election Calendar," accessed July 27, 2012
  3. Texas Secretary of State "You Must Register By...," accessed July 27, 2012
  4. Texas Redistricting Map "Map" Accessed July 24, 2012
  5. Texas Secretary of State, "Important 2012 Election Dates," accessed July 15, 2011
  6. Washington Post, "Federal court orders May 29 primary date for Texas in redistricting case
  7. 7.0 7.1 El Paso Times, "Beto O'Rourke to challenge Reyes for Congress", September 1, 2011
  8. Democratic candidate list
  9. Politico, "5 incumbents facing primary fight," May 3, 2012
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 The Washington Post "The next Jean Schmidt? The top 10 House incumbents who could lose their primaries" Accessed April 1, 2012
  11. Moonshadow Mobile's CensusViewer "Texas's congressional districts 2001-2011 comparison"
  12. Labels & Lists "VoterMapping software voter counts"
  13. FairVote, "2011 Redistricting and 2012 Elections in Texas," September 2012
  14. Cook Political Report "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" Accessed October 2012
  15. 15.0 15.1 Huffington Post, "Rep. Silvestre Reyes, Challenger Beto O'Rourke Square Off Over Drug War In Fierce Texas Primary," April 19, 2012
  16. 16.0 16.1 OpenSecrets.org, Texas' 16th Congressional District 2012 race, Accessed April 19, 2012
  17. Houston Chronicle blog "Houston-based super PAC targeting more Texas incumbents," April 8, 2012
  18. Huffington Post "Eric Cantor Chaos: Campaign For Primary Accountability Donation Becomes Texas Democratic Issue," April 11, 2012
  19. Federal Election Commission, "Beto O'Rourke April Quarterly," accessed July 17, 2012
  20. Federal Election Commission, "Beto O'Rourke Pre-Primary," accessed July 17, 2012
  21. Federal Election Commission, "Barbara Carrasco April Quarterly," accessed July 17, 2012
  22. Federal Election Commission, "Barbara Carrasco Pre-Primary," accessed July 17, 2012
  23. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010"
  24. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008"
  25. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2006"
  26. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004"
  27. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002"
  28. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000"
  29. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998"