Texas' 23rd Congressional District elections, 2014

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2012

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Texas' 23rd Congressional District

General Election Date
November 4, 2014

Primary Date
March 4, 2014

Incumbent prior to election:
Pete Gallego Democratic Party
Pete Gallego.jpg

Race Ratings
Cook Political Report: Lean D[1]

Sabato's Crystal Ball: Lean D[2]


Texas U.S. House Elections
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2014 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Texas.png
BattlegroundRace.jpg
The 23rd Congressional District of Texas will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

Texas' 23rd Congressional District is a battleground in 2014. Incumbent Pete Gallego is a Democratic incumbent seeking re-election in a district that slightly favors Republicans.[3][4] The district went to John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012.[5] Additionally, Gallego is a freshman incumbent who won election in 2012 by less than 5 percent. Gallego will face Will Hurd (R) in November.

Hurd went through a very contentious Republican primary race to make it to the general election ballot. He and Francisco Canseco advanced through the primary election to the runoff with under 1 percent difference in their vote totals. Hurd had a much easier time in the runoff, where he beat Canseco by 19 points.

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
December 9, 2013
March 4, 2014
November 4, 2014

Primary: Texas is one of 21 states with a mixed primary system. Voters do not have to register with a party. At the primary, they may choose which party primary ballot to vote on, but in order to vote they must sign a pledge declaring they will not vote in another party's primary or convention that year.[6][7]

Voter registration: Voters had to register to vote in the primary by February 2, 2014. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 5, 2014 (30 days prior to election).[8]

See also: Texas elections, 2014

Incumbent: Heading into the election the incumbent is Pete Gallego (D), who was first elected in 2012.

Texas' 23rd Congressional District is located in the western portion of the state and includes El Paso, Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Reeves, Presidio, Brewster, Lvoing , Winkler, Ward, Crane, Upton, Reagan, Terrell, Pecos, Crockett, Schleicher, Sutton, Edwards, Val Verde, Kinney, Maverick, Uvalde, Zavala, Dimmit, La Salle, Frio, Medina and Bexar counties.[9]

Candidates

General election candidates

Democratic Party Pete Gallego
Republican Party Will Hurd
Libertarian Party Ruben Corvalan


May 27, 2014, Republican primary runoff candidates

March 4, 2014, primary results

Republican Party Republican Primary

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Libertarian Party Libertarian Convention

Election results

General election

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Pete Gallego Incumbent 0% 0
     Republican Will Hurd 0% 0
     Libertarian Ruben Corvalan 0% 0
Total Votes 0

Primary election

U.S. House, Texas District 23 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngWill Hurd 41% 10,496
Green check mark transparent.pngFrancisco Canseco 40.3% 10,332
Robert Lowry 18.7% 4,796
Total Votes 25,624
Source: Texas Secretary of State
U.S. House, Texas District 23 Runoff Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngWill Hurd 59.5% 8,699
Francisco Canseco 40.5% 5,930
Total Votes 14,629
Source: Texas Secretary of State Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

Race background

Incumbent Pete Gallego (D) is a vulnerable incumbent in 2014. He is a Democratic incumbent in a district that slightly favors Republicans and voted for the Republican candidate in the last two presidential elections. Gallego is a member of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's Frontline Program. The program is designed to help protect vulnerable Democratic incumbents heading into the 2014 election.[10]

Gallego will face Will Hurd (R) and Ruben Corvalan (L) in the general election on November 4, 2014.

Endorsements

Following his defeat in the primary, Robert Lowry threw his support behind Will Hurd. He said, "Will Hurd has actually fought to protect and defend our Constitution. He will fight for our privacy and our liberty. I know he won't say one thing and go to Washington and do another. I asked my supporters for their input on this important decision and an overwhelming majority thought Will was the best choice. I believe he will stand up to the broken system of DC insider politics, and will represent we the people back here at home, as opposed to just towing the line of the party's leadership."[11]

Media

The conservative PAC Hispanic Leadership Fund spent $200,000 on a local Spanish language TV ad. The ad attacked Gallego on the costs of Obamacare.[12]


Obamacare and Pete Gallego

Issues

See also: Energy and the 2014 election: the ballots and beyond

Pete Gallego

Gallego's campaign website lists the following issues:[13]

  • Education: "There’s an unquestionable connection between access to education and a better future. Education opened the door to opportunity in my life, and I believe all Texas should have a shot at a better future. In the state legislature, I fought attempts to cut $5.4 billion from public education. Rather than using any of the $6 billion available in the state’s savings account known as the Rainy Day Fund, the legislature opted to leave Texas schools underfunded by billions of dollars and shortchange our students."
  • Veterans: "I strongly believe we owe a great debt to the men and women who defend and have defended our country. We must make sure that we are supporting local military families and veterans. We need to make sure they receive prompt and high-quality care at VA clinics, increase funding to programs that provide aid for wounded veterans and support programs that help these men and women to find jobs once they get home. As the son of a World War II veteran, I take these issues very personally."
  • Immigration: "Our country is made up of immigrants who made the journey to the United States in search of the American dream. But we all know that our immigration system is broken. I am a strong supporter of comprehensive immigration reform, including beefed up efforts to improve border security to keep criminals out and a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants already in this country who pay a fine, pay back taxes, learn to speak English and stand in line. Comprehensive immigration reform will not only make our country safer, it will also make our economy stronger."
  • Constituent Services: "I ran for Congress to help people and I've made constituent services a centerpiece of my tenure. In just over a year in office my staff and I have helped my constituents receive or recuperate over $2 million from the federal government. This includes helping veterans appeal denied benefits and seniors recuperate earned Social Security."
  • DREAM Act: "I strongly support the DREAM Act, which would let young people who were brought to this country as children, graduated from high school and stayed out of trouble, to earn a path to citizenship through military service or by going to college. I was proud to vote for the Texas DREAM Act, and I continue to look forward to voting for the federal DREAM Act in Congress. Since extreme right-wing members in Congress obstructed the passage of the DREAM Act, I support the deferred action policy that offers DREAM Act eligible youth, on a case-by-case basis, relief from deportation."

[14]

—Pete Gallego's campaign website, http://petegallego.com/priorities

Will Hurd

Hurd's campaign website lists the following issues:[15]

  • Protecting a citizen’s right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness.
  • Decreasing the regulatory burdens facing those creating and expanding businesses.
  • Protecting our economic future by balancing our budget and simplifying our tax code.
  • Ensuring our ability to be energy independent.
  • Pursuing a foreign policy that is based on clear political and economic goals.
  • Securing our borders by making border security, countering drug traffickers and fighting cyber criminals a national intelligence priority.
  • Reaffirming the Republican Party as the party of all Americans trying to move up the economic ladder.

[14]

Key votes

Below are important votes the current incumbent cast during the 113th Congress.

HR 644

See also: Bowe Bergdahl exchange

Yea3.png On September 9, 2014, the Republican-run House approved H.R. 644, a resolution condemning President Barack Obama's act of exchanging five Guantanamo Bay prisoners for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.[16][17] The House voted 249-163 for resolution, with all Republicans and 22 Democrats supporting the bill. Fourteen Democrats and five Republicans did not vote on the resolution, while all other Democrats opposed its passage.[17] Pete Gallego dissented from the majority of the Democratic party and voted in favor of the bill.[16][17]

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Nay3.png On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[18] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[19] Pete Gallego voted against the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[20]

Yea3.png The shutdown ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[21] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Pete Gallego voted for HR 2775.[22]

Campaign contributions

Pete Gallego

Pete Gallego (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[23]April 15, 2013$34,891.80$233,683.84$(87,233.93)$181,341.71
July Quarterly[24]July 15, 2013$181,341.71$243,410.84$(104,218.83)$320,533.72
October Quarterly[25]October 15, 2013$320,533.72$193,210.53$(130,457.04)$383,287.21
Year-End[26]January 31, 2014$383,287$226,937$(77,876)$532,348
Pre-Primary[27]February 20, 2014$532,348$70,739$(70,649)$532,437
April Quarterly[28]April 15, 2014$532,437$273,424$(74,918)$730,943
July Quarterly[29]July 15, 2014$730,943$414,396$(331,056)$814,283
October Quarterly[30]October 15, 2014$814,283$616,348$(919,168)$511,464
Running totals
$2,272,149.21$(1,795,576.8)

Will Hurd

Will Hurd (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
July Quarterly[31]July 15, 2013$0.00$116,049.00$(15,065.00)$100,984.00
October Quarterly[32]October 15, 2013$100,984.00$154,789.00$(43,810.64)$211,962.36
Year-End[33]January 31, 2014$211,962$53,985$(62,321)$203,625
Pre-Primary[34]February 20, 2014$203,625$42,587$(129,951)$116,261
April Quarterly[35]April 15, 2014$116,261$79,851$(155,851)$40,260
Pre-Runoff[36]May 15, 2014$40,260$90,848$(59,915)$71,192
July Quarterly[37]July 15, 2014$71,192$181,196$(102,199)$150,189
October Quarterly[38]October 15, 2014$150,189$424,873$(372,581)$202,481
Running totals
$1,144,178$(941,693.64)

Francisco Canseco

Francisco Canseco (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[39]April 15, 2013$319,533$18,541$(9,592)$328,482
July Quarterly[40]July 15, 2013$328,482$5,915$(192,472)$141,925
October Quarterly[41]October 15, 2013$141,925$14,605$(18,240)$138,290
Year-End[42]January 31, 2014$138,290$130,271$(856,680)$182,880
Pre-Primary[43]February 20, 2014$182,880$40,835$(45,594)$178,121
April Quarterly[44]April 15, 2014$178,121$40,312$(56,779)$161,654
Running totals
$250,479$(1,179,357)

Robert Lowry

Robert Lowry (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[45]April 15, 2013$0.00$3,250.00$(1,624.77)$1,625.23
July Quarterly[46]July 15, 2013$1,625.23$9,475.56$(7,891.37)$3,209.42
October Quarterly[47]October 15, 2013$3,209.42$11,705.70$(10,673.33)$4,241.79
Year-End[48]January 14, 2014$4,241$3,829$(8,286)$-215
Running totals
$28,260.26$(28,475.47)

District history

Candidate ballot accecss
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2012

The 23rd Congressional District of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which Pete Gallego (D) won election. He defeated incumbent Francisco Canseco (R), Jeffrey Blunt (L) and Ed Scharf (G) in the general election. This switched partisan control of the district.[49]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngPete Gallego 50.3% 96,676
     Republican Francisco Canseco Incumbent 45.6% 87,547
     Libertarian Jeffrey C. Blunt 3% 5,841
     Green Ed Scharf 1.1% 2,105
Total Votes 192,169
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010

On November 2, 2010, Francisco Canseco won election to the United States House. He defeated Ciro Rodriguez (D), Craig Stephens (I), Martin Nitschke (L) and Ed Scharf (G) in the general election.[50]

U.S. House, Texas District 23 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngFrancisco Canseco 49.4% 74,853
     Democratic Ciro Rodriguez incumbent 44.4% 67,348
     Independent Craig Stephens 3.6% 5,432
     Libertarian Martin Nitschke 1.6% 2,482
     Green Ed Scharf 0.9% 1,419
Total Votes 151,534

See also

External links

References

  1. Cook Political Report, "2014 HOUSE RACE RATINGS FOR June 26, 2014," accessed July 28, 2014
  2. Sabato's Crystal Ball, "2014 House Races," accessed July 28, 2014
  3. FairVote, "FairVote Releases Projections for the 2014 Congressional Elections," accessed November 5, 2013
  4. Cook Political Report, "2014 HOUSE RACE RATINGS," accessed April 4, 2014
  5. Daily Kos, "Daily Kos Elections' presidential results by congressional district for the 2012 and 2008 elections," accessed February 5, 2014
  6. Fair Vote, "Congressional and Presidential Primaries: Open, Closed, Semi-Closed, and 'Top Two,'" accessed January 2, 2014
  7. Texas Statutes, "Section 172.086," accessed January 3, 2014
  8. VoteTexas.gov, "Register to Vote," accessed January 3, 2014
  9. Texas Redistricting Map, "Map," accessed July 24, 2012
  10. Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, "DCCC Chairman Steve Israel Announces 2013-2014 Frontline Members," accessed March 5, 2013
  11. Burnt Orange Report, "CD-23, Third Place Finisher Dr. Robert Lowry Endorses Will Hurd Over Fmr. Rep. Quico Canseco," April 8, 2014
  12. YouTube, "$6,777 - Obamacare and Pete Gallego (Spanish)," October 24, 2013
  13. Campaign website, "Priorities," accessed September 12, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  15. Campaign website, "Issues," accessed January 27, 2014
  16. 16.0 16.1 The Hill, "House votes to condemn administration over Taliban prisoner swap," September 9, 2014
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote 485," accessed September 10, 2014
  18. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  19. Buzzfeed, "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013
  20. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  21. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  22. U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013
  23. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego April Quarterly," accessed July 24, 2013
  24. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego July Quarterly," accessed July 24, 2013
  25. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego October Quarterly," accessed October 22, 2013
  26. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego Year-End," accessed February 5, 2014
  27. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego Pre-Primary," accessed April 20, 2014
  28. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego April Quarterly," accessed April 20, 2014
  29. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego July Quarterly," accessed July 23, 2014
  30. Federal Election Commission, "Pete Gallego October Quarterly," accessed October 20, 2014
  31. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd July Quarterly," accessed July 28, 2013
  32. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd October Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013
  33. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd Year-End," accessed February 5, 2014
  34. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd Pre-Primary," accessed May 2, 2014
  35. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd April Quarterly," accessed May 2, 2014
  36. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd Pre-Runoff," accessed July 25, 2014
  37. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd July Quarterly," accessed July 25, 2014
  38. Federal Election Commission, "Will Hurd October Quarterly," accessed October 22, 2014
  39. Federal Election Commission, "Francisco Canseco April Quarterly," accessed February 5, 2014
  40. Federal Election Commission, "Francisco Canseco July Quarterly," accessed February 5, 2014
  41. Federal Election Commission, "Francisco Canseco October Quarterly," accessed February 5, 2014
  42. Federal Election Commission, "Francisco Canseco Year-End," accessed February 5, 2014
  43. Federal Election Commission, "Francisco Canseco Pre-Primary," accessed May 2, 2014
  44. Federal Election Commission, "Francisco Canseco April Quarterly," accessed May 2, 2014
  45. Federal Election Commission, "Robert Lowry April Quarterly," accessed July 28, 2013
  46. Federal Election Commission, "Robert Lowry July Quarterly," accessed July 28, 2013
  47. Federal Election Commission, "Robert Lowry October Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013
  48. Federal Election Commission, "Robert Lowry Year-End," accessed February 5, 2014
  49. Politico, "2012 Election Map, Texas," November 6, 2012
  50. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013