Texas Proposition 7 (2001)

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Texas Amendment 7 was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment authorizing the Veterans' Land Board to issue up to $500 million in general obligation bonds payable from the general revenues of the state for veterans’ housing assistance and to use assets in certain funds to provide for veterans cemeteries. It was on the November 6, 2001 general election ballot in Texas where it was approved.

Election results

Amendment 7
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 611,943 74.67%
No207,48425.32%

Text of measure

The short ballot summary voters saw on their ballot read: "The constitutional amendment authorizing the Veterans' Land Board to issue up to $500 million in general obligation bonds payable from the general revenues of the state for veterans' housing assistance and to use assets in certain veterans' land and veterans' housing assistance funds to provide for veterans cemeteries." [1]

Constitutional changes

Proposition 7 amended:

Ballot language

The language that appeared on the ballot:

The proposed amendment would allow the Veterans' Land Board to issue general obligation bonds that would be payable from the general revenues of the state and use the proceeds derived from the sale of the bonds to provide home mortgage loans to Texas veterans. The principal amount of outstanding bonds authorized by the proposed amendment could not at any one time exceed $500 million. The proposed amendment would provide that before the proceeds from the sale of the bonds are loaned, the proceeds shall be deposited in or used to benefit and augment a constitutionally created fund known as the Veterans' Housing Assistance Fund II.

The voters have previously approved amendments to the Texas Constitution that authorize the issuance of general obligation bonds for the purpose of making home mortgage loans to Texas veterans. The bonds authorized by the proposed amendment are in addition to the bonds previously authorized by the voters for this purpose, and the proposed amendment would provide that the bonds shall be repaid from the same sources and in the same manner as previous bonds issued for this purpose in connection with the Veterans' Housing Assistance Fund II.

The proposed amendment would also allow the Veterans' Land Board to use excess assets in the Veterans' Land Fund, the Veterans' Housing Assistance Fund, and the Veterans' Housing Assistance Fund II to plan and design, operate, maintain, enlarge, or improve veterans cemeteries.

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing direct democracy in Texas

As laid out in Article 17 of the Texas Constitution, in order for a proposed constitutional amendment to be placed on the ballot, the Texas State Legislature must propose the amendment in a joint resolution of both the Texas State Senate and the Texas House of Representatives. The joint resolution can originate in either the House or the Senate. The resolution must be adopted by a vote of at least two-thirds of the membership of each house of the legislature. That amounts to a minimum of 100 votes in the House of Representatives and 21 votes in the Senate.

See also

External links

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References