Texas Proposition 8 (2001)

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Texas Amendment 8 was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment authorizing the issuance of up to $850 million in bonds payable from the general revenues of the state for construction and repair projects and for the purchase of needed equipment. It was on the November 6, 2001 general election ballot in Texas where it was approved.

Election results

Amendment 8
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 509,148 62.51%
No305,26537.48%

Text of measure

The short ballot summary voters saw on their ballot read: "The constitutional amendment authorizing the issuance of up to $850 million in bonds payable from the general revenues of the state for construction and repair projects and for the purchase of needed equipment."[1]

Constitutional changes

Proposition 7 added:

Ballot language

The language that appeared on the ballot:

The proposed amendment would allow the legislature to authorize the Texas Public Finance Authority to issue up to $850 million in general obligation bonds, and to enter into related credit agreements, that would be payable from the general revenues of the state. Under the proposed amendment and its enabling legislation, House Bill No. 3064, the proceeds derived from the sale of the bonds could be used in accordance with the legislative appropriations of the proceeds to pay for certain construction or repair projects or for the purchase of certain needed equipment. To be eligible for bond funding, a construction or repair project or an equipment purchase would have to be authorized by the legislature by general law or in the General Appropriations Act. In addition, a construction or repair project would have to be administered by or for one of the following state agencies, and an equipment purchase would have to be made by or for one of the following state agencies: the General Services Commission, the Texas Youth Commission, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, the Parks and Wildlife Department, the adjutant general's department, the Texas School for the Deaf, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Public Safety of the State of Texas, the State Preservation Board, the Texas Department of Health, the Texas Historical Commission, or the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing direct democracy in Texas

As laid out in Article 17 of the Texas Constitution, in order for a proposed constitutional amendment to be placed on the ballot, the Texas State Legislature must propose the amendment in a joint resolution of both the Texas State Senate and the Texas House of Representatives. The joint resolution can originate in either the House or the Senate. The resolution must be adopted by a vote of at least two-thirds of the membership of each house of the legislature. That amounts to a minimum of 100 votes in the House of Representatives and 21 votes in the Senate.

See also

External links

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References