Thousand Oaks City Council Term Limits, Measure L (November 2012)

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A Thousand Oaks City Council Term Limits, Measure L ballot question was on the November 6, 2012 ballot for voters in the City of Thousand Oaks in Ventura County, where it was approved.

The approval of Measure L means that members of the Thousand Oaks City Council will have their terms limited; specifically, "no person shall serve more than three consecutive four-year terms, either by election or appointment, and following a four year absence, a new three consecutive four-year term limit shall apply."

Election results

Measure L
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 42,903 77.81%
No12,23322.19%
Final official results from the Ventura County elections office.

Support

Al Adam, a former city planning commissioner, led the charge for Measure L. This began in 2010 when he first filed the language with the Thousand Oaks city clerk. Eventually, he led a signature drive that collected approximately 11,000 signatures to qualify Measure M for the ballot.[1]

Adam said, in favor of Measure L, that term limits will end "the ever-spiraling costs for local campaigns, reduce the power of special interests and open the field to ordinary citizens with new ideas and fresh thinking. Our Founding Fathers envisioned a rotation in office with citizen legislators serving their country. Yet the reality is that incumbents are elected over and over and over again because of name recognition and the money they raise."[1]

Adam also said, "It’s hard for the regular citizen to compete in an election. ... I just think incumbents have this fundraising advantage and I’d like to see it open up."[2]

Ballot question

The question on the ballot:

Measure L: "Shall the ordinance adding Term Limits for City Council members as follows be adopted: no person shall serve more than three consecutive four-year terms, either by election or appointment, and following a four year absence, a new three consecutive four-year term limit shall apply?"[3]

See also

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