Wisconsin County Government Uniformity and Veto Power Amendment, Question 1 (April 1969)

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The Wisconsin County Government Uniformity Amendment was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment on the April 1, 1969 ballot in Wisconsin, where it was approved.

This amendment modified Article IV, Section 23 of the Wisconsin Constitution to create an exemption to the requirement for uniformity of county government under constitutional law, and gives county executives veto power.[1]

Election results

Question 1
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 326,445 50.35%
No321,85149.65%

Official results via: The Wisconsin Blue Book 1970

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

"Shall sections 23 and 23a of article IV of the constitution be amended to provide that the requirement for uniformity of county government shall not apply to the administrative means o( exercising powers of a local legislative character conferred by the constitution upon county boards and that the legislature may provide for all counties to have an elected chief executive officer with veto power?"[1]

Constitutional changes

(Article IV) Section 23. The legislature shall establish but one system of town and county government, which shall be as nearly uniform as practicable, except that the requirement of uniformity shall not apply to the administrative means of exercising powers of a local legislative character conferred by section 22 upon the boards of supervisors of the several counties; but the legislature may provide for the election at large once in every four 4 years of a chief executive officer in any county having a population of five hundred thousand or more with such powers of an administrative character as they may from time to time prescribe in accordance with this section.
Section 23a. Every resolution or ordinance passed by the county board in any county having a population of five hundred thousand or more shall, before it becomes effective, be presented to the chief executive officer. If he approves, he shall sign it; if not, he shall return it with his objections, which objections shall be entered at large upon the journal and the board shall proceed to reconsider the matter. Appropriations may be approved in whole or in part by the chief executive officer and the part approved shall become law, 'and the part objected to shall be returned in the same manner as provided for in other resolutions or ordinances. If, after such reconsideration, two-thirds of the members-elect of the county board agree to pass the resolution or ordinance or the part of the resolution or ordinance objected to, it shall become effective on the date prescribed but not earlier than the date of passage following reconsideration. In all such cases, the votes of the members of the county board shall be determined by ayes and says noes and the names of the members voting for or against the resolution or ordinance or the part thereof objected to shall be entered on the journal. If any resolution or ordinance is not returned by the chief executive officer to the county board at its first meeting occurring not less than six 6 days, Sundays excepted, after it has been presented to him, it shall become effective unless the county board has recessed or adjourned for a period in excess of sixty 60 days, in which case it shall not be effective without his approval.[1]

Path to the ballot

  • First Legislative Approval: AJR 18 & JR 49 (1967)
  • Second Legislative Approval: SJR 8 & JR 2 (1969)[2]

See also

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