Writing:Divisions (state executive offices)

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This page is a content-and-style guide about how to add the section "Divisions" to state office articles in the State Executive Officials Project.
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Divisions

This section is added to profiles about state-specific offices. This includes articles like Governor of Texas or Lieutenant Governor of Alabama.

This section features a brief summary of what the divisions of the office do (e.g. ."..provide technical assistance to the Governor across of range of policy areas. They provide research, advice, and organizational leadership...") and subsections for each division.

Individual division subsections should feature specific information about that division (e.g. duties, assigned tasks, specialties). Additionally, using "collapsible wiki code" contact information should be readily available.

NOTE: for stub articles

For stub articles or articles that have recently been built, simply create a bullet list of the different divisions.

==Divisions==
* division 1
* division 2
* division 3
* division 4
* etc.

Installation

Summary text that describes how many divisions, if any exist, for the state office.
Also state what the divisions are expected to do for the state office (advice, research, etc.).

===<u>Division title</u>===
:State specific information about the division. What are the duties? What are the divisions' specialties?

{{Collapsible list
  |framestyle = border:none; padding:0; text-align:left;
  |title=<u>Contact DIVISION NAME</u>
|1 = Phone: ###-###-####<BR>
Department Mailing Address:  LIST ADDRESS HERE <BR> 
Department Physical Address: LIST ADDRESS HERE <BR>
Fax: ###-###-####<BR>
}}<br/><br/>

===<u>Division title</u>===
:State specific information about the division. What are the duties? What are the divisions' specialties?

{{Collapsible list
  |framestyle = border:none; padding:0; text-align:left;
  |title=<u>Contact DIVISION NAME</u>
|1 = Phone: ###-###-####<BR>
Department Mailing Address:  LIST ADDRESS HERE <BR> 
Department Physical Address: LIST ADDRESS HERE <BR>
Fax: ###-###-####<BR>
}}<br/><br/>

Example

Below is an example of how this section would appear in an article. See also: Governor of Texas.

Divisions

The Office of the Governor consists of a number councils, committees, and divisions comprised of leaders and experts from diverse backgrounds who provide technical assistance to the Governor across of range of policy areas. They provide research, advice, and organizational leadership to the Governor in support of a "vision for a better, more prosperous Texas."[1] The Office of the Governor is currently comprised as follows:

Advisory Council on Physical Fitness

The Advisory Council on Physical Fitness was created by Governor Rick Perry "to take the lead on improving the state’s overall fitness through sports, health and nutrition education, and exercise."[2]


Appointments Office

The Appointment Office is a team devoted to assisting the Governor in identifying, recruiting, and hiring talented individuals for the many positions that must be filled in a gubernatorial term.
Appointment is an executive power under which the Governor selects individuals to head state government bodies, councils, and bureaucracies. Appointment power is granted to the governor by the Texas Constitution. '"Article 4, Section 12" states: "All vacancies in State or district offices, except members of the Legislature, shall be filled unless otherwise provided by law by appointment of the Governor."[3] The appointment of officials is one of the most influential methods by which the Governor executes the policies enacted by the legislature. Approximately 3,000 appointments will be made during a four-year term.[4]


See also

References