Attorney General of Wyoming

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Wyoming Attorney General
General information
Office Type:  Partisan
Office website:  Official Link
2013-2014 FY Budget:  $88,511,550
Term limits:  None
Structure
Authority:   Wyoming Constitution, Article 4, Section 11
Selection Method:  Appointed
Current Officeholder

Peter Michael.jpg
Name:  Peter Michael
Officeholder Party:  Republican
Assumed office:  July 22, 2013
Compensation:  $147,000
Other Wyoming Executive Offices
GovernorLieutenant GovernorSecretary of StateAttorney GeneralTreasurer • Auditors: AuditorDirectorSuperintendent of EducationDirector of EducationAgriculture CommissionerInsurance CommissionerLabor CommissionerPublic Service Commission
The Attorney General of Wyoming is an appointed, statutory position in the Wyoming state government. As the chief legal officer for the state, the attorney general provides legal opinions to state officials and represents the state in both civil and criminal matters. The attorney general is appointed by the governor with the consent of the state senate.[1]

Current officeholder

The office is currently held by Republican Peter Michael. The previous officeholder, Gregory Alan Phillips, was confirmed for a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit on July 8, 2013.[2][3]

Authority

Unlike many states, Wyoming's constitution does not provide for the office of attorney general. In Article 4 of however, it does grant the state legislature the power to create offices it deems necessary.

Article 4, Section 11:

... The legislature may provide for such other state officers as are deemed necessary.

The office of attorney general in Wyoming was created by legislative statute.

Qualifications

Title 9, Chapter 1, Article 6 of the Wyoming Code establishes the qualifications of the office:

Prior to his appointment, the attorney general shall have been a practicing attorney for at least four (4) years. At the date of appointment, he shall be in good standing in the courts of record of this state and shall be a resident and elector of the state.
  • practicing attorney for at least four years
  • in good standing in Wyoming's courts
  • a resident of Wyoming
  • a registered voter in Wyoming[1]

Appointments

According to Title 9, Chapter 1, Article 6 of the Wyoming Code, the attorney general is appointed by the governor with the consent of the state senate.[1]

Vacancies

In the event of a vacancy in the office, the governor shall appoint a qualified person to fill the vacancy.[1]

Duties

The attorney general serves as the chief legal officer of Wyoming. Their office represents state agencies in courts of law and provides legal opinions to state officials. The office does not provide legal advice to individual citizens, organizations or private businesses.[4]

Title 9, Chapter 1, Section 6 of the Wyoming Code outlines the specific duties of the office:

  1. Prosecute and defend all suits instituted by or against the state of Wyoming, the prosecution and defense of which is not otherwise provided for by law;
  2. Represent the state in criminal cases in the supreme court;
  3. Defend suits brought against state officers in their official relations, except suits brought against them by the state;
  4. Represent the state in suits, actions or claims in which the state is interested in either the Wyoming supreme court or any United States court;
  5. Be the legal adviser of all elective and appointive state officers and of the county and district attorneys of the state;
  6. When requested, give written opinions upon questions submitted to him by elective and appointive state officers and by either branch of the legislature, when in session;
  7. Effective July 1, 2000, serve as the designated agency to administer the Wyoming governor's council on developmental disabilities. A memorandum of understanding shall be executed by and between the designated agency and the governor's council, which shall incorporate the provisions of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, 42 U.S.C. 6024;
  8. Approve or disapprove any contract submitted to him for review within thirty (30) days of submission.[1]

Divisions

Click here to view larger-scale image of the Wyoming Attorney General organizational chart as of June 30, 2012.

The office of the attorney general is divided into the following offices:

  • Administration Division
  • Human Services Division
  • Civil Division
  • Consumer Protection Unit
  • Tobacco Settlement Unit
  • Criminal Division
  • Medicaid Fraud Control Unit
  • Tort Litigation Division
  • Water & Natural Resources Division
  • Medical Review Panel
  • Division of Criminal Investigation
    • Wyoming Sex Offender Registry
  • Governor's Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities
  • Law Enforcement Academy
  • Peace Officer Standards & Training
  • Victim Services Division

State budget

See also: Wyoming state budget and finances

The budget for the Attorney General's Office in Fiscal Year 2013-2014 was $88,511,550.[5]

Compensation

See also: Compensation of state executive officers

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Title 9, Chapter 3 of the Wyoming Statutes

Title 9, Chapter 3, Article 1 (§9‑3-101) of the Wyoming Statutes notes that the governor establishes the attorney general's salary along with "other state employees and officers."[6]

2014

In 2014, the attorney general received a salary of $147,000, according to the Council of State Governments.[7]

2013

In 2013, the attorney general was paid an estimated $143,328.[8]

2010

In 2010, the attorney general was paid an estimated $137,150 according to the Council of State Governments.[9]

Historical officeholders

Note: Ballotpedia's state executive officials project researches state official websites for chronological lists of historical officeholders. That information for the Attorney General of Wyoming has not yet been added because the information was unavailable on the relevant state official websites, or we are currently in the process of formatting the list for this office. If you have any additional information about this office for inclusion on this section and/or page, please email us.

State profile

Wyoming's population in 2014 was 584,153.

Wyoming's population in 2014 was 584,153 according to the United States Census Bureau. This estimate represented a 3.6 percent change from the bureau's 2010 estimate. The state's population per square mile was 5.8 in 2010, trailing the national average of 87.4. Wyoming experienced a 2.8 percent increase in total employment from 2011 to 2012 based on census data, exceeding a 2.2 percent increase at the national level during the same period.[10]

Demographics

Wyoming fell below the national average for residents who attained at least bachelor's degrees based on census data from 2009 to 2013. The United States Census Bureau found that 24.7 percent of Wyoming residents aged 25 years and older attained bachelor's degrees compared to 28.8 percent at the national level. The median household income in Wyoming was $57,406 between 2009 and 2013 compared to a $53,046 national median income. Census information showed a 10.9 percent poverty rate in Wyoming during the study period compared to a 14.5 percent national poverty rate.[10]

Racial Demographics, 2013[10]
Race Wyoming (%) United States (%)
White 92.7 77.7
Black or African American 1.7 13.2
American Indian and Alaska Native 2.6 1.2
Asian 0.9 5.3
Two or More Races 1.9 2.4
Hispanic or Latino 9.7 17.1

Presidential Voting Pattern, 2000-2012[11][12]
Year Democratic vote in Wyoming (%) Republican vote in Wyoming (%) Democratic vote in U.S. (%) Republican vote in U.S. (%)
2012 27.6 68.2 51.1 47.2
2008 32.4 64.4 52.9 45.7
2004 28.8 68.2 48.3 50.7
2000 27.3 66.7 48.4 47.9

Note: The United States Census Bureau considers "Hispanic or Latino" to be a place of origin rather than a race. Citizens may report both their race and their place of origin, and as a result, the percentages in each column of the racial demographics table may exceed 100 percent.[13][14]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the terms "Wyoming Attorney General."

Some of the stories below may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of Google's news search engine.

Attorney General of Wyoming - Google News Feed

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Contact information

Attorney General's Office
123 Capitol Building
200 W. 24th Street
Cheyenne, WY 82002

Phone: (307) 777-7841
Fax: (307) 777-6869 FAX

See also

External links

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Suggest a link

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Wyoming Legislative Services, "Title 9, Chapter 1, Article 6: Attorney General," accessed August 21, 2011
  2. Star Tribune, "Obama nominates Wyoming attorney general for federal appeals court," January 31, 2013
  3. Casper Star Tribune, "U.S. Senate unanimously approves Wyoming Attorney General Greg Phillips for judgeship," July 8, 2013
  4. Wyoming Attorney General website, "Main page," accessed August 21, 2011
  5. Wyoming Department of Administration and Information, "Department Budget Summary Attorney General 2013-2014," accessed April 2, 2013
  6. Wyoming Legislative Service Office, "Wyoming Statutes: Title 9 - Administration of Government: Chapter 3 - Compensatin and Benefits: Article 1 - Salaries and Expenses," accessed February 25, 2015
  7. Council of State Governments, "SELECTED STATE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS: ANNUAL SALARIES," accessed December 8, 2014
  8. Council of State Governments, Table 4.11 Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries," accessed January 31, 2014
  9. The Council of State Governments, "The Book of States 2010 Table 4.11," accessed May 14, 2011
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 United States Census Bureau, "QuickFacts Beta," accessed April 3, 2015
  11. Wyoming Secretary of State, "Wyoming Election Results," accessed April 3, 2015
  12. The American Presidency Project, "Presidential Elections Data," accessed April 3, 2015
  13. United States Census Bureau, "Frequently Asked Questions," accessed April 21, 2014
  14. Each column will add up to 100 percent after removing the "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin percentages, although rounding by the Census Bureau may make the total one- or two-tenths off from being exactly 100 percent. This Ballotpedia page provides a more detailed explanation of how the Census Bureau handles race and ethnicity in its surveys.