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2012 Ballot Measure Election Results:California

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November 6, 2012

California

By Josh Altic

SACRAMENTO, California: Eleven ballot measure were on the California 2012 ballot on November 6, with voters casting their decisions on the issues. The results below are from the California Secretary of State as of November 7, 2012 at 2:03 a.m. PST with 79.6% ( 19,494 of 24,491 ) precincts partially reporting. For daily updates on the results of the California Proposition races until the final results have been certified follow Ballotpedia's article on the California 2012 election ballot and the articles on each proposition featured there.

Out of the 11 measures on the ballot, 5 were approved, and 6 were defeated.

Below is a rundown of results for each of the eleven propositions on the ballot.

Proposition 30

This initiated constitutional amendment increased sales and income taxes to provide additional revenue for the general fund and for education.

Proposition 30 was narrowly approved by California voters. Of the ballots counted in 19,494 precincts so far 53.3% approved the tax increases and 46.7% voted no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 31

Proposition 31 would have:

  • Established a two-year state budget cycle
  • Prohibited the California State Legislature from "creating expenditures of more than $25 million unless offsetting revenues or spending cuts are identified."
  • Permitted the Governor of California to cut the budget unilaterally during declared fiscal emergencies if the state legislature fails to act.
  • Required performance reviews of all state programs.
  • Required performance goals in state and local budgets.
  • Required publication of all bills at least three days prior to a vote by the California State Senate or California State Assembly.
  • Given counties the power to alter state statutes or regulations related to spending unless the state legislature or a state agency vetoes those changes within 60 days.

. According to the California’s Secretary of State's website, Proposition 31 was decisively defeated with 60.2% voting no and 39.8% voting yes. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 32

Prop 32, an initiated state statute, would have:

  • Ban both corporate and union contributions to state and local candidates.
  • Ban contributions by government contractors to the politicians who control contracts awarded to them.
  • Ban automatic deductions by corporations, unions, and government of employees’ wages to be used for politics.

California’s Secretary of State's website shows Proposition 32 rejected by 55.4% of voters, with 44.6% voting yes. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's page for California 2012 ballot measures.

Proposition 33

Proposition 33 sought to allow insurers to set prices based on whether the driver previously carried insurance coverage with any insurance company. Insurers, if this prop passed, would have been able to offer discounts to new customers who can prove they were continuously covered by any licensed auto insurance company over the previous five years. Insurers would have been able to increase the cost of insurance to drivers who have not maintained continuous coverage. These discounts are known as "persistency discounts" or "loyalty discounts" and under current California law, insurance companies can only offer them to existing customers..

According to the California’s Secretary of State's website, Proposition 33 was defeated with 45.6% voting yes and 54.4% voting no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's page for California 2012 ballot measures.

Proposition 34

This measure would have eliminated the death penalty in California and replaced it with life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Election results from the California Secretary of State website say that Proposition 34 was defeated. 46.7% voted yes and 53.3% voted no, making the race a close one. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's page for California 2012 ballot measures.

Proposition 35

This initiated state statute sought to:

  • Increase prison terms for human traffickers.
  • Require convicted sex traffickers to register as sex offenders.
  • Require all registered sex offenders to disclose their internet accounts.
  • Require criminal fines from convicted human traffickers to pay for services to help victims.
  • Mandate law enforcement training on human trafficking.

According to the California’s Secretary of State's website Proposition 35 was overwhelmingly approved, with a supermajority of 81.4% voting yes and 18.6% voting no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 36

Prop. 36, the initiated state statute changing the criminal law of California, sought to:

  • Revise the three strikes law to impose life sentence only when the new felony conviction is "serious or violent".
  • Authorize re-sentencing for offenders currently serving life sentences if their third strike conviction was not serious or violent and if the judge determines that the re-sentence does not pose unreasonable risk to public safety.
  • Continue to impose a life sentence penalty if the third strike conviction was for "certain non-serious, non-violent sex or drug offenses or involved firearm possession".
  • Maintain the life sentence penalty for felons with "non-serious, non-violent third strike if prior convictions were for rape, murder, or child molestation."

Proposition 36 was passed, according to the California Secretary of State website, being approved by 68.6% of voters and rejected by 31.4%. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's page for California 2012 ballot measures.

Proposition 37

This food related initiated state statute establishes the following:

  • Requires labeling on raw or processed food offered for sale to consumers if the food is made from plants or animals with genetic material changed in specified ways.
  • Prohibits labeling or advertising such food as "natural."
  • Exempts from this requirement foods that are "certified organic; unintentionally produced with genetically engineered material; made from animals fed or injected with genetically engineered material but not genetically engineered themselves; processed with or containing only small amounts of genetically engineered ingredients; administered for treatment of medical conditions; sold for immediate consumption such as in a restaurant; or alcoholic beverages."

. Proposition 37 was defeated by a fairly narrow margin of less than eight percent with 46.3% voting yes and 53.7% voting no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 38

This Proposition, one of the nine initiated state statutes on the California ballot, would have increased state income tax to support education.

Voters were opposed to this income tax increase, According to the California’s Secretary of State's website, which shows Prop. 38 defeated by a fairly substantial margin. 72.7% of electors voted no and 27.3% voted yes. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Ballotpedia's page for California 2012 ballot measures has more information and will be updated with further developments.

Proposition 39

This statewide proposition increased state income taxes, adding possibly $1 billion to the state’s revenue and creating approximately 40,000 construction and clean energy jobs, according to the non-partisan California Legislative Analyst's Office.

Initially, this extra revenue would fund green energy projects, construction projects, public schools, and boost the state’s general fund.

For further information on the details of this proposition see Ballotpedia's article on Proposition 39.

According to the California’s Secretary of State's website, Proposition 39 was approved by 59.7% of voters, while 40.3% voted no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's page for California 2012 ballot measures.

Proposition 40

A "yes" vote on this veto referendum is a vote to maintain intact the work of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission, while a "no" vote is a vote to overturn the commission's redistricting lines.

The Commission was supported by voters in this election, as the decision to maintain its work made by the 72.0% of the electors who voted yes for Prop. 40. Only 28.0% voted no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's page for California 2012 ballot measures.

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