2013 State Legislative Elections Review: Special elections and few changes in New Jersey and Virginia

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2013 State Legislative Elections

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Other 2013 Election coverage
Primary electionsStatewide elections, 2013State legislative special elections, 2013State executive official elections, 20132013 ballot measures


November 6, 2013

By Ballotpedia's State legislative team

In the 50 states, there are 99 state legislative chambers altogether, and three of the 99 chambers held state legislative elections on November 5, 2013.

The three chambers with elections in 2013 are in two states - New Jersey and Virginia.

Louisiana and Mississippi also typically hold elections in odd years. However, legislators are elected to 4-year terms in those states and those are not up for election again until 2015.

A total of 40 of the country's 1,972 state senate seats, and 180 of the country's 5,411 state house seats were up for re-election. Altogether, 220 of the country's 7,383 state legislative seats were up for re-election on November 5, 2013.

On November 5, there were seventeen special elections scheduled. Because voters in Washington vote by mail, the three elections in that state will not be decided until later in the week.

See also: State legislative elections, 2013
See also: State legislative special elections, 2013

Election results are detailed below. Click on a tab to preview either general election or special election results.

[edit]

There were 220 seats up for election on November 5, 2013.

A total of 40 (2.0%) of the country's 1,972 state senate seats were up for election in November 2013, and 180 (3.3%) of the country's 5,411 state house seats were up for election. Altogether, 220 (3.0%) of the country's 7,383 state legislative seats were up for election.

Partisan Balance of All 99 Chambers Before and After 2013 Elections
Pre-election Post-election
Legislative chamber Democratic Party Republican Party Purple.png Independent Democratic Party Republican Party Purple.png Independent
State senates 20 28 1 1 20 28 1 1
State houses 21 28 0 0 21 28 0 0
Totals: 41 56 1 1 41 56 1 1
  • In the three states with elections, there were 205 incumbents who ran in the general election. Four of those incumbents, two Democrats and two Republicans, were defeated on November 5, 2013.
  • In total, 23 (10.5%) new legislators were elected in 2013. Of these 23, eight (34.8%) were Democrats and 15 (65.2%) were Republicans.
  • Open seat general election contests made up 17 (7.7%) of the 220 seats in 2013. Of these 17 open seats, Democrats won five (29.4%) while Republicans won 12 (70.6%).

New Jersey

Democratic activists expressed concern that Governor Chris Christie's "coattails" would lead to a Republican state legislature and allow him to successfully promote a conservative agenda ahead of a presidential run in 2016. The Fund for Jobs, Growth and Security super PAC won a legal battle allowing it to spend unlimited amounts on state legislative campaigns in New Jersey. It was founded to prevent Christie's popularity from creating Republican majorities in New Jersey's 2013 elections. The super PAC's president is Susan McCue, who was dubbed by POLITICO as one of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) "closest confidantes," is the organization's president.[1]

New Jersey State Senate
Party As of November 4, 2013 After the 2013 Election
     Democratic Party 24 24
     Republican Party 16 16
Total 40 40
New Jersey General Assembly
Party As of November 4, 2013 After the 2013 Election
     Democratic Party 48 48
     Republican Party 32 32
Total 80 80

Democrats were able to stop any strong gains by Republican candidates in the 2013 election. There were no changes to the partisan balance of the State Senate. Republicans in General Assembly were able to pick up two seats from the Democratic majority. In the Senate, every incumbent who ran in 2013 won re-election. Two Democratic incumbents from the General Assembly were defeated on November 5, 2013.

The following are a few races that turned up extremely close under unofficial election results.

Senate District 14

Democratic Party June 4 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 4 Republican primary:

November 5 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Linda R. Greenstein Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Peter A. Inverso
Libertarian Party Don Dezarn

Note: Unofficial results put Greenstein ahead of Inverso by a margin of 30,999 to 29,759 votes. Dezarn obtained 1,001 according to unofficial results.[2]

Senate District 38

Democratic Party June 4 Democratic primary:
  • Bob Gordon Approveda - Incumbent Gordon first assumed office in 2008.
Republican Party June 4 Republican primary:

November 5 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Bob Gordon Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Fernando A. Alonso

Note: Unofficial results put Gordon ahead of Alonso by a margin of 26,168 to 24,579 votes.[2]

Assembly District 38

Democratic Party June 4 Democratic primary:

Note: Assemblywoman Connie Terranova Wagner (D) withdrew from election on June 11, citing family reasons.[3]

Republican Party June 4 Republican primary:

November 5 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Timothy J. Eustace
Democratic Party Joseph Lagana Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Joan Fragala
Republican Party Joseph J. Scarpa Green check mark transparent.png

Note: Unofficial results put Scarpa ahead of Eustace by a margin of 24,716 to 24,545 votes. Lagana obtained 24,838 according to unofficial results.[2]

Virginia

In the 2013 elections for the Virginia House of Delegates, the Democrats were looking to make inroads into the Republican majorities built up during the 2009 and 2011 state legislative elections. Democratic candidates needed to win a net of 19 seats from Republican officeholders or the Republican candidates seeking to succeed them. In the 2013 elections for the Virginia House of Delegates, all 100 seats were up for election.


Virginia House of Delegates
Party As of November 4, 2013 After the 2013 Election
     Democratic Party 32 33
     Republican Party 65 67
     Independent 1 0
     Vacancy 2 0
Total 100 100


Republican majorities ultimately held strong, with Democrats gaining one seat and Republicans bolstering their majority by an additional two seats. Two seats were previously vacant and one seat, previously held by independent Lacey Putney, was won by a Republican candidate. The following are some interesting elections and races that turned up extremely close under unofficial election results.

District 2

Democratic Party June 11 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 11 GOP primary:

November 5 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Michael Futrell Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Mark Dudenhefer

Note: Unofficial results put Futrell ahead of Dudenhefer by a margin of 8,183 to 7,960 votes.[4]

District 31

Democratic Party June 11 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 11 GOP primary:

November 5 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Jeremy McPike
Republican Party Scott Lingamfelter Green check mark transparent.png

Note: Unofficial results put Lingamfelter ahead of McPike by a margin of 11,506 to 11,272 votes.[4]

District 86

Democratic Party June 11 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 11 GOP primary:
  • Tom Rust Approveda - Incumbent Rust first assumed office in 2002.

November 5 General election candidates:

Democratic Party Jennifer B. Boysko
Republican Party Tom Rust Green check mark transparent.png

Note: Unofficial results put Rust ahead of Boysko by a margin of 10,383 to 10,327 votes.[4]

District 93

Democratic Party June 11 Democratic primary:
Republican Party June 11 GOP primary:

November 5 General election candidates:

Democratic Party T. Monty Mason Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Michael Watson

Note: Unofficial results put Mason ahead of Watson by a margin of 12,138 to 11,102 votes.[4]

On November 5, 2013, there were seventeen special elections scheduled. Because voters in Washington vote by mail, the three elections in that state will not be decided until later in the week. No vacant seats changed party hands.

Special elections on November 5, 2013
State Elections
Georgia 4
Massachusetts 1
Michigan 1
Mississippi 3
New Hampshire 1
New York 3
Texas 1
Washington 3

Highlighted Race

Background

In December 2012, Tim Sheldon (D), Rodney Tom (D) and 23 Republicans signed a pledge to form a majority caucus called the Majority Coalition Caucus, wresting control of the Senate from the Democratic caucus which had maintained an advantage following the 2012 election. Under this arrangement, Sheldon became President Pro Tempore and Tom became Senate Majority Leader, with Republicans filling the remaining leadership positions. Though hailed by caucus members as a bellwether of cooperation, Democrats disagreed with claims of bipartisanship.

In the 2013-2014 legislative session, three committees are chaired by Democrats, 11 by Republicans, and one is co-chaired.[5]

Prior to the formation of the Majority Coalition Caucus, Washington had a Democratic trifecta. A state government trifecta is when one political party holds the governorship and a majority in both legislative chambers.

Special election

UncheckedBox.jpgWashington State Senate District 26
Democrat Nathan Schlicher faced Republican Jan Angel to decide who would claim the seat formerly held by Sen. Derek Kilmer (D). Kilmer won election to the United States House of Representatives in November 2012. As of 12:15 PM PST November 6, these are the preliminary results:[6]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic PartyNathan Schlicher - 13,400
Republican Party Jan Angel - 14,170

Results

Georgia

RunoffArrow.jpgGeorgia State Senate District 14
Republicans Matt Laughridge and Bruce Thompson will meet in a December 3 runoff to decide who will take Sen. Barry Loudermilk's (R) seat. Loudermilk resigned in order to focus on his Congressional campaign.[7]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Christopher G. Nesmith
Republican Party Nicole Ebbeskotte
Republican Party Matt Laughridge Approveda
Republican Party Dwight Pullen
Republican Party Dean Sheridan
Republican Party Bruce Thompson Approveda

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgGeorgia House of Representatives District 100
Democrat Dewey McClain was unopposed in this election and will replace Rep. Brian Thomas (D). Thomas resigned to accept a position with Natural Resources Group in Lamoine, Maine.[7]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Dewey McClain Green check mark transparent.png

RunoffArrow.jpgGeorgia House of Representatives District 104
Republicans Teresa Cantrell and Chuck Efstration will meet in a runoff on December 3 to decide who will claim Rep. Donna Sheldon's (R) seat. Sheldon resigned in order to focus on her Congressional campaign.[7]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Republican Party Teresa Cantrell Approveda
Republican Party Chuck Efstration Approveda
Republican Party Tim Puckett
Republican Party Todd Tyson

RunoffArrow.jpgGeorgia House of Representatives District 127
Democrats Diane B. Evans and Brian Prince will meet in a runoff on December 3 to decide who will claim Rep. Quincy Murphy's (D) seat. Murphy passed away on August 2 after a battle with lung cancer.[7]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Diane B. Evans Approveda
Democratic Party Dianne Murphy
Democratic Party Brian Prince Approveda

Massachusetts

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgMassachusetts State Senate 2nd Hampden and Hampshire District
Republican [[Donald F. Humason, Jr.] retained the seat for his party by defeated Democrat David K. Bartley. Sen. Michael Knapik (R) resigned to become the executive director of advancement at Westfield State University.[8]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party David K. Bartley
Republican Party Donald F. Humason, Jr. Green check mark transparent.png

Michigan

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgMichigan House of Representatives District 49
Democrat Phil Phelps retained the seat for his party by defeatign Republican Don Pfeiffer and Libertarian Pat Clawson. Rep. Jim Ananich (D) resigned after he was elected to the Michigan State Senate on May 7.[9]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Phil Phelps Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Don Pfeiffer
Libertarian Party Pat Clawson

Mississippi

RunoffArrow.jpgMississippi House of Representatives District 5
Andre R. DeBerry and John Gary Faulkner will meet in a runoff on November 26 to decide who will claim Rep. Kelvin Buck's (D) seat. Buck was elected Mayor of Holly Springs, MS.[10]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Independent Daylon Cannon
Independent Andre R. DeBerry Approveda
Independent Arthur "Clyde" Ellzey
Independent John Gary Faulkner Approveda
Independent Lee Edward Gill
Independent Jacqueline Simon
Independent Robert Earl Young

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgMississippi House of Representatives District 55
Oscar Denton won the seat formerly held by Rep. George Flaggs, Jr. (D). Flaggs was elected Mayor of Vicksburg, MS.[10]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Independent Oscar Denton Green check mark transparent.png
Independent Chris Green
Independent Andrew W. Harrell
Independent Marie Thompson
Independent Joseph E. Williams, Jr.

RunoffArrow.jpgMississippi House of Representatives District 110
Jeramey Anderson and Aneice R. Liddell will meet in a runoff on November 26 to decide who will claim Rep. Billy Broomfield's (D) seat. Broomfield was elected Mayor of Moss Point, MS.[11]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Independent Jeramey Anderson Approveda
Independent Tyres Autrey
Independent Mitch Ellerby
Independent Aneice R. Liddell Approveda
Independent Anne A. McMillion

New Hampshire

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgNew Hampshire House of Representatives Hillsborough District 35
Democrat Latha Mangipudi (D) retained the seat for her party by defeated Republican Peter Silva. Rep. Roland LaPlante (D) resigned in February 2013 citing health concerns.[12]

November 5 Special election:
Democratic Party Latha Mangipudi Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Peter Silva

New York

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgNew York State Assembly District 2
Republican Anthony Palumbo retained the seat for his party by defeating Democrat John McManmon. Rep. Daniel Losquadro (R) resigned in March after being elected Superintendent of Highways in Brookhaven Town.[13]

November 5 Special election:
Democratic Party John McManmon
Republican Party Anthony Palumbo Green check mark transparent.png

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgNew York State Assembly District 53
Democrat Maritza Davila retained the seat for her party by defeating Working Families candidate Jason Otano. Rep. Vito Lopez (D) resigned on May 20 amidst a sex scandal.[13]

November 5 Special election:
Democratic Party Maritza Davila Green check mark transparent.png
Working Families Party Jason Otano

CheckedBoxOffset.jpgNew York House of Representatives District 86
Democrat Victor Pichardo retained the seat for his party by defeating Republican Rene Santos and Libertarian Jose Marte. Rep. Nelson Castro (D) resigned on April 8, 2013 following his role in the bribery scandal that saw fellow Assemblyman Eric Stevenson (D) charged.[13]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Victor Pichardo Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Rene Santos
Libertarian Party Jose Marte

Texas

RunoffArrow.jpgTexas House of Representatives District 50
Democrat Celia Israel and Republican Mike VanDeWalle will meet in a runoff on December 10 to decide who will claim Rep. Mark Strama's (D) seat. Strama resigned to lead Google's fiber optics operation in Austin, TX.[14]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Celia Israel Approveda
Democratic Party Rico Reyes
Democratic Party Jade Chang Sheppard
Republican Party Mike VanDeWalle Approveda

Washington

UncheckedBox.jpgWashington State Senate District 7
Republicans Brian Dansel and John Smith faced off to decide who will claim the seat held by former Sen. Bob Morton (R). Morton retired on January 1, 2013. As of 12:15 PM PST November 6, these are the preliminary results:[15]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Republican Party Brian Dansel - 12,362
Republican Party John Smith - 10,617

UncheckedBox.jpgWashington State Senate District 8
Republicans Phillip R. Lemley and Sharon Brown faced off to decide who will claim the seat held by former Sen. Bob Morton (R). Morton retired on January 1, 2013. As of 12:15 PM PST November 6, these are the preliminary results:[16]

November 5 Special election candidates:
Republican Party Phillip R. Lemley - 4,627
Republican Party Sharon Brown - 14,135

See also

References

  1. POLITICO, "Democrats eye super PACs for state races," September 22, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Associated Press, "New Jersey - Summary Vote Results," November 6, 2013
  3. nj.com, "N.J. Assemblywoman in crucial district drops bid for re-election", June 11, 2013
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Virginia Board of Elections, "Unofficial Results - General Election," accessed November 5, 2013
  5. The Seattle Times, "Legislature: Power play puts Senate in GOP hands," January 14, 2013. Retrieved January 23, 2013
  6. vote.wa.gov, "Preliminary election results," accessed November 6, 2013
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 results.enr.clarityelections.com, "Unofficial election results," accessed November 5, 2013
  8. masslive.com, "Unofficial election results," November 5, 2013
  9. co.genesee.mi.us, "Unofficial election results," November 5, 2013
  10. 10.0 10.1 tribtown.com, "Runoffs for 2 Mississippi House seats; Deaton wins Vicksburg-based House post," November 6, 2013
  11. blog.gulflive.com, "Jeramey Anderson, 21, in runoff with former mayor Aneice Liddell for House 110 seat," November 5, 2013
  12. nashuatelegraph.com, " Mangipudi wins special rep. race; five incumbents lose; Ward 3 alderman race to be recounted," November 5, 2013
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 hosted.ap.org, "Unofficial election results," November 5, 2013
  14. team1.sos.state.tx.us, "Unofficial election results," November 5, 2013
  15. vote.wa.gov, "Preliminary election results," accessed November 6, 2013
  16. vote.wa.gov, "Preliminary election results," accessed November 6, 2013