Alabama Healthcare Amendment, Amendment 6 (2012)

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Amendment 6
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Type:Constitutional amendment
Constitution:Alabama Constitution
Referred by:Alabama Legislature
Topic:Health care
Status:Approved Approveda
The Alabama Health Care Amendment, also known as Amendment 6, appeared on the November 6, 2012 ballot in the state of Alabama as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. The measure, according to the text of the amendment, prohibited mandatory participation in any health care system. The formal title of the proposal was House Bill 60, and was introduced by multiple state representatives in 2011 state legislative session.[1]

The measure was an attempt to block the Affordable Health Care Act that was signed by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010 from taking effect in the state.[2]

Election results

See also: 2012 ballot measure election results

The following are official election results:

Alabama Amendment 6
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 969,069 58.96%
No674,51841.04%

Results via the Alabama Secretary of State's website.

Text of measure

Bill synopsis

The synopsis of the bill, as presented to the Alabama Legislature, read as follows:[3]

"This bill would propose an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to prohibit any person, employer, or health care provider from being compelled to participate in any health care system."

Ballot language

The ballot language of the proposal reads:[3]

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to prohibit any person, employer, or health care provider from being compelled to participate in any health care system.

Yes ___

No ___[4]

Support

Supporters

  • State Representative Phil Williams commented: “We want the people of Alabama to know that if we're going to join a program like that we're going to have it on a ballot and you and me and everyone will be able to vote and decide if we want to join a national health plan or not."

Opposition

No formal opposition has been identified yet.

Campaign contributions

No campaign contributions were made in favor or opposition of the measure, according to state election websites.[5]

Path to the ballot

Article XVIII of the Alabama Constitution said that it took a three-fifths (60%) vote of the Alabama State Legislature to qualify an amendment for the ballot. The measure was passed during the last day of 2011 state legislative session, officially sending it to the ballot in 2012 for public vote.[6]

See also

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External links

Additional reading

References