Difference between revisions of "Approved liquor privatization measure faces lawsuit in state of Washington"

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'''By [mailto:bdludlam@ballotpedia.org Bailey Ludlam]'''
 
'''By [mailto:bdludlam@ballotpedia.org Bailey Ludlam]'''
 
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'''OLYMPIA, [[Washington]]:''' Two labor unions, the United Food and Commercial Workers and the Teamsters, are challenging Washington's recently passed [[Washington Liquor State Licensing, Initiative 1183 (2011)|liquor privatization initiative]] (I-1183).  
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'''OLYMPIA, [[Washington]]:''' Two labor unions, the United Food and Commercial Workers and the Teamsters, are challenging Washington's recently passed [[Washington Liquor State Licensing, Initiative 1183 (2011)|liquor privatization initiative]] (I-1183) in King County Superior Court.<ref name="Times"/>
  
Beside privatizing liquor sales, the unions note that the measure also changes regulations on wine distribution, liquor franchises, and alcohol advertising. This, they argue, violates the state's [[single-subject rule]].  
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Beside privatizing liquor sales, the unions note that the measure also changes regulations on wine distribution, liquor franchises, and alcohol advertising. This, they argue, violates the state's [[single-subject rule]].<ref name="Times"/>
  
They also argue that these changes were designed to benefit the chief backer of the measure, Costco. Costco contributed an estimated $21 million to the effort in support of Initiative 1183.  
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They also argue that these changes were designed to benefit the chief backer of the measure, Costco. Costco contributed an estimated $21 million to the effort in support of Initiative 1183.<ref name="Times"/>
  
About 1,000 union workers are expected to lose their current jobs under the plan.<ref>[http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2016947384_liquorsuit07.html ''The Seattle Times,'' "Unions sue to block liquor initiative from taking effect," December 6, 2011]</ref>
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The two unions represent about 1,000 union workers that are expected to lose their current jobs under the plan.<ref name="Times">[http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2016947384_liquorsuit07.html ''The Seattle Times,'' "Unions sue to block liquor initiative from taking effect," December 6, 2011]</ref>
  
The measure was approved by 59% on [[Washington Liquor State Licensing, Initiative 1183 (2011)|November 8, 2011]].  
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The measure was approved by 59% on [[Washington Liquor State Licensing, Initiative 1183 (2011)|November 8, 2011]]. Initiative 1183 officially becomes law on [[BC2011#December|December 8, 2011]].
  
 
:*The press release for the lawsuit can be found [http://blog.thenewstribune.com/politics/2011/12/06/unions-file-suit-against-private-liquor-i-1183-claim-it-violates-state-constitution-ban-on-having-two-subjects-in-one-law/ here.]
 
:*The press release for the lawsuit can be found [http://blog.thenewstribune.com/politics/2011/12/06/unions-file-suit-against-private-liquor-i-1183-claim-it-violates-state-constitution-ban-on-having-two-subjects-in-one-law/ here.]

Latest revision as of 09:49, 8 December 2011

December 8, 2011

By Bailey Ludlam

Washington

OLYMPIA, Washington: Two labor unions, the United Food and Commercial Workers and the Teamsters, are challenging Washington's recently passed liquor privatization initiative (I-1183) in King County Superior Court.[1]

Beside privatizing liquor sales, the unions note that the measure also changes regulations on wine distribution, liquor franchises, and alcohol advertising. This, they argue, violates the state's single-subject rule.[1]

They also argue that these changes were designed to benefit the chief backer of the measure, Costco. Costco contributed an estimated $21 million to the effort in support of Initiative 1183.[1]

The two unions represent about 1,000 union workers that are expected to lose their current jobs under the plan.[1]

The measure was approved by 59% on November 8, 2011. Initiative 1183 officially becomes law on December 8, 2011.

  • The press release for the lawsuit can be found here.

See also

Ballotpedia News

References