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Difference between revisions of "Arizona's 2nd Congressional District"

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Arizona's 2nd Congressional District previously included the northwestern corner of the state and most of the western suburbs of Phoenix as well as a small portion of the city itself.<ref>[http://www.opencongress.org/states/AZ/districts/2 ''OpenCongress'' "Arizona's 2nd Congressional District," Accessed December 28, 2011]</ref>
 
Arizona's 2nd Congressional District previously included the northwestern corner of the state and most of the western suburbs of Phoenix as well as a small portion of the city itself.<ref>[http://www.opencongress.org/states/AZ/districts/2 ''OpenCongress'' "Arizona's 2nd Congressional District," Accessed December 28, 2011]</ref>
  
The current representative of the 2nd Congressional District is [[Ron Barber]] (R).
+
The current representative of the 2nd Congressional District is [[Ron Barber]] (D).
  
 
==Elections==
 
==Elections==

Revision as of 16:24, 21 January 2014

Arizona's 2nd Congressional District
Arizona's 2nd.jpg
Current incumbentRon Barber Democratic Party
Population722,918
Gender50.8% Female, 49.2% Male
Race81.8% White, 4.1% Black, 3.2% Asian
Ethnicity26.5% Hispanic
Unemployment10.7%
Median household income$44,921
High school graduation rate90.1%
College graduation rate30.3%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
The 2nd District is located in the southeastern corner of Arizona and includes Cochise County and part of Pima County.[1]

Arizona's 2nd Congressional District previously included the northwestern corner of the state and most of the western suburbs of Phoenix as well as a small portion of the city itself.[2]

The current representative of the 2nd Congressional District is Ron Barber (D).

Elections

2014

See also: Arizona's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

According to a Washington Post article in December 2012, incumbent Ron Barber (D) is 1 of the 10 most vulnerable incumbents in 2014.[3]

The National Republican Congressional Committee listed Barber's seat as one of seven early targets in the 2014 congressional elections.[4] The seven targets align perfectly with the seven most Republican districts currently held by Democrats, according to FairVote's partisanship index. Barber's district ranks as the 7th most Republican (46% D).[5]

2012

See also: Arizona's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2012
U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRon Barber Incumbent 50.4% 147,338
     Republican Martha McSally 49.6% 144,884
     Libertarian Anthony Powell 0% 57
Total Votes 292,279
Source: Arizona Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Trent Franks won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Thrasher (D), Powell Gammill (L), William Crum (Write-in) and Mark Rankin (Write-in) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTrent Franks incumbent 64.9% 173,173
     Democratic John Thrasher 31.1% 82,891
     Libertarian Powell Gammill 4.1% 10,820
     Write-in William Crum 0% 8
     Write-in Mark Rankin 0% 2
Total Votes 266,894

2008
On November 4, 2008, Trent Franks won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Thrasher (D), Powell Gammill (L) and William Crum (G) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTrent Franks incumbent 59.4% 200,914
     Democratic John Thrasher 37.2% 125,611
     Libertarian Powell Gammill 2.3% 7,882
     Green William Crum 1.1% 3,616
Total Votes 338,023

2006
On November 7, 2006, Trent Franks won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Thrasher (D) and Powell Gammill (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTrent Franks incumbent 58.6% 135,150
     Democratic John Thrasher 38.9% 89,671
     Libertarian Powell Gammill 2.5% 5,734
     N/A Write-in 0% 5
Total Votes 230,560

2004
On November 2, 2004, Trent Franks won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Randy Camacho (D) and Powell Gammill (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTrent Franks incumbent 59.2% 165,260
     Democratic Randy Camacho 38.5% 107,406
     Libertarian Powell Gammill 2.4% 6,625
     N/A Write-in 0% 12
Total Votes 279,303

2002
On November 5, 2002, Trent Franks won election to the United States House. He defeated Randy Camacho (D), Edward Carlson (L) and William Crum (Write-in) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTrent Franks 59.9% 100,359
     Democratic Randy Camacho 36.5% 61,217
     Libertarian Edward Carlson 3.5% 5,919
     Write-in William Crum 0% 7
Total Votes 167,502

2000
On November 7, 2000, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bill Barenholtz (R), Geoffrey Weber (L) and Barbara Shelor (Natural Law) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 68.5% 84,034
     Republican Bill Barenholtz 26.9% 32,990
     Libertarian Geoffrey Weber 2.6% 3,169
     Natural Law Barbara Shelor 2% 2,412
Total Votes 122,605

1998
On November 3, 1998, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ed Barron (R), Rick Duncan (L) and Gregory Schultz (Reform) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 67.8% 57,178
     Republican Ed Barron 28% 23,628
     Libertarian Rick Duncan 3.1% 2,646
     Reform Gregory Schultz 1.1% 911
Total Votes 84,363

1996
On November 5, 1996, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jim Buster (R) and Alice Bangle (L) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 65% 81,982
     Republican Jim Buster 30.8% 38,786
     Libertarian Alice Bangle 4.2% 5,333
Total Votes 126,101

1994
On November 8, 1994, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Robert Macdonald (R) and James Bertrand (L) in the general election.[14]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 62.3% 62,589
     Republican Robert Macdonald 32.7% 32,797
     Libertarian James Bertrand 5% 5,060
Total Votes 100,446

1992
On November 3, 1992, Ed Pastor won election to the United States House. He defeated Don Shooter (R) and Dan Detaranto (L) in the general election.[15]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor 66% 90,693
     Republican Don Shooter 30% 41,257
     Libertarian Dan Detaranto 3.9% 5,423
     N/A Write-in 0% 5
Total Votes 137,378

1990
On November 6, 1990, Morris Udall won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Joseph Sweeney (R) in the general election.[16]

U.S. House, Arizona District 2 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMorris Udall incumbent 65.9% 76,549
     Republican Joseph Sweeney 34.1% 39,586
     N/A Write-in 0% 44
Total Votes 116,179

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 2nd Congressional District of Arizona after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Arizona

In 2011, the Arizona State Legislature re-drew the congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

External links

See also

References

  1. Arizona Redistricting "Map" accessed July 7, 2012
  2. OpenCongress "Arizona's 2nd Congressional District," Accessed December 28, 2011
  3. Washington Post "House Democrats Face Long Odds in 2014," December 7, 2012
  4. The Hill, "NRCC, promising to 'stay on offense,' targets seven Dems," January 16, 2013
  5. FairVote "NRCC Targets Foreshadow Power of Partisanship in 2014 Elections," January 18, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  15. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  16. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013