Difference between revisions of "Arizona Property Tax Assessed Valuation Amendment, Proposition 117 (2012)"

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  status = On the ballot|
 
  status = On the ballot|
 
}}The '''Arizona Property Tax Assessed Valuation Amendment''', also known as '''Proposition 117''', will be on the [[Arizona 2012 ballot measures|November 6, 2012 general election]] ballot in the state of [[Arizona]] as a {{lrcafull}}. The measure would limit the annual growth in the limited property value of locally assessed properties. The limit would begin in 2015. The formal title of the measure was [http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=SCR1025&Session_Id=107 Senate Concurrent Resolution 1025.]<ref> [http://www.azleg.gov//FormatDocument.asp?inDoc=/legtext/50leg/2r/bills/scr1025p.htm&Session_ID=107 ''Arizona Legislature'', "SCR 1025", Retrieved May 14, 2012]</ref>
 
}}The '''Arizona Property Tax Assessed Valuation Amendment''', also known as '''Proposition 117''', will be on the [[Arizona 2012 ballot measures|November 6, 2012 general election]] ballot in the state of [[Arizona]] as a {{lrcafull}}. The measure would limit the annual growth in the limited property value of locally assessed properties. The limit would begin in 2015. The formal title of the measure was [http://www.azleg.gov/DocumentsForBill.asp?Bill_Number=SCR1025&Session_Id=107 Senate Concurrent Resolution 1025.]<ref> [http://www.azleg.gov//FormatDocument.asp?inDoc=/legtext/50leg/2r/bills/scr1025p.htm&Session_ID=107 ''Arizona Legislature'', "SCR 1025", Retrieved May 14, 2012]</ref>
 
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==Opposition==
 +
* According to Lynne Weaver,chairman of Prop. 13 Arizona, in an editorial, "Prop. 117 does nothing to stop tax overrides put on the ballot by school districts. The maximum override used to be 10 percent but it was increased to 15 percent and a special election was held to allow the school districts to raise your taxes immediately. Will they increase overrides to 20 percent? 25 percent? More?"<ref> [http://campverdebugleonline.com/main.asp?SectionID=36&SubSectionID=73&ArticleID=35635 ''Camp Verde Bugle Online'', "My Turn: Prop. 117 does nothing to limit property taxes", August 16, 2012]</ref>
 
==Path to the ballot==
 
==Path to the ballot==
 
A majority vote is required in the [[Arizona State Legislature]] to send a constitutional amendment to the ballot. Arizona is one of [[Legislatively-referred constitutional amendment#Majority vote|ten states that allow a referred amendment to go on the ballot]] after a majority vote in one session of the [[state legislature|state's legislature]].
 
A majority vote is required in the [[Arizona State Legislature]] to send a constitutional amendment to the ballot. Arizona is one of [[Legislatively-referred constitutional amendment#Majority vote|ten states that allow a referred amendment to go on the ballot]] after a majority vote in one session of the [[state legislature|state's legislature]].

Revision as of 10:33, 22 August 2012

Proposition 117
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Type:Constitutional amendment
Constitution:Arizona Constitution
Referred by:Arizona State Legislature
Topic:Taxes
Status:On the ballot
The Arizona Property Tax Assessed Valuation Amendment, also known as Proposition 117, will be on the November 6, 2012 general election ballot in the state of Arizona as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure would limit the annual growth in the limited property value of locally assessed properties. The limit would begin in 2015. The formal title of the measure was Senate Concurrent Resolution 1025.[1]

Opposition

  • According to Lynne Weaver,chairman of Prop. 13 Arizona, in an editorial, "Prop. 117 does nothing to stop tax overrides put on the ballot by school districts. The maximum override used to be 10 percent but it was increased to 15 percent and a special election was held to allow the school districts to raise your taxes immediately. Will they increase overrides to 20 percent? 25 percent? More?"[2]

Path to the ballot

A majority vote is required in the Arizona State Legislature to send a constitutional amendment to the ballot. Arizona is one of ten states that allow a referred amendment to go on the ballot after a majority vote in one session of the state's legislature.

See also

References