Arizona Runoff Elections Amendment, Proposition 100 (1992)

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The Arizona Runoff Elections Amendment, also known as Proposition 100 and House Concurrent Resolution 2001, was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment on the statewide ballot in Arizona, which was approved in the statewide election on November 3, 1992.

  • This proposed amendment Articles V, VII and VIII removes the requirement that a runoff election be held if no candidate receives a majority of votes cast for the offices of Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, Attorney General or Superintendent of Public Instruction.[1]

Election results

Arizona Proposition 100 (1992)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 927,913 67.06%
No455,71232.94%

Official results via: State of Arizona Official Canvass

Text of measure

The text of the ballot read:

OFFICIAL TITLE

House Concurrent Resolution 2001
A concurrent resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Arizona; amending Article V, Section 1, Article VII, Section 7 and Article VIII, Part 1, Section 4, Constitution of Arizona; relating to election of certain officers.

DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

Amending Arizona Constitution to remove the requirement that a runoff election be held if no candidate receives a majority of votes cast in a general or recall election for the offices of Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, Attorney General or Superintendent of Public Instruction.[1][2]

Constitutional changes

Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring:
1. The following amendment of article V, section 1, Constitution of Arizona, is proposed to become valid when approved by a majority of the qualified electors voting thereon and on proclamation of the Governor:
Section 1. A. The executive department shall consist of the governor, secretary of state, state treasurer, attorney general, and superintendent of public instruction, each of whom shall hold office for four years beginning on the first Monday of January, 1971 next after the regular general election in 1970.
B. The person having a majority THE HIGHEST NUMBER of the votes cast for the office voted for shall be elected. If no person receives a majority of the votes cast for the office, a second election shall be held as prescribed by law between the persons receiving the highest and second highest number of votes cast for the office. The person receiving the highest number of votes at the second election for the office is elected, but if thetwo OR MORE persons have an equal AND THE HIGHEST number of votes for the office, the two houses of the legislature at its next regular session shall. elect forthwith, by joint ballot, one of such persons for said office.
C. The officers of the executive department during their terms of office shall reside at the seat of government where they shall keep their offices and the public records, books, and papers. They shall perform such duties as are prescribed by the constitution and as may be provided by law.
2. The following amendment of article VII, section 7, Constitution of Arizona, is proposed to become valid when approved by a majority of the qualified electors voting thereon and on proclamation of the Governor:
7. Highest number of votes received as determinative of person elected
Section 7. Except for offices designated in article V, section 1, In all elections held by the people in this state, the person, or persons, receiving the highest number of legal votes shall be declared elected.
3. The following amendment of article VIII, part 1, section 4, Constitution of Arizona, is proposed to become valid when approved by a majority of the qualified electors voting thereon and on proclamation of the Governor:
4. Special election; candidates; results; qualification of successor
Section 4. Unless the incumbent otherwise requests, in writing, the incumbent's name shall be placed as a candidate on the official ballot without nomination. Other candidates for the office may be nominated to be voted for at said election. If the office is one designated in article V, section 1, the candidate who receives a majority of the votes cast is elected for the remainder of the term. If no person receives a majority of the votes cast, a second election shall be held as prescribed by law between the persons receiving the highest and second highest number of votes cast. The person receiving the highest number of votes at the second election is elected for the remainder of the term. The candidate for an office which is not designated in article V, section 1 who shall receive WHO RECEIVES the highest number of votes shall be declared elected for the remainder of the term. Unless the incumbent receives the HIGHEST number of votes prescribed in this section, the incumbent shall be deemed to be removed from office, upon qualification of the successor. In the event that the successor shall not qualify within five days after the result of said election shall have been declared, the said office shall be vacant, and may be filled as provided by law.
4. The proposed amendments (approved by a majority of the members elected to each house of the Legislature, and entered upon the respective journals thereof, together with the ayes and nays thereon) shall be submitted to the qualified electors by the Secretary of State at the next regular general election, or at a special election called for that purpose, as provided by article XXI, Constitution of Arizona.[1]

Note: Deleted language is crossed out, added language is capitalized.

Path to the ballot

Proposition 100 was placed on the ballot by HCR 2001.[1]
House votes:

  • Ayes - 43
  • Nays - 9
  • Not Voting - 4
  • Excused - 1
  • Vacancy - 3

Senate votes:

  • Ayes - 25
  • Nays - 3
  • Not Voting - 2

Support

Arguments in favor of the amendment include:[1]

  • Runoff elections have been shown to be impractical and expensive.
  • The proposition would increase the voters' choices of candidates by making it easier for candidates not from the two major parties.

Opposition

Arguments in opposition of the amendment include:[1]

  • The proposition would allow a candidate to be elected without having a majority of people in the state electing them.

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 State of Arizona 1992 Ballot Proposition voting guide
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.