Arizona State Trust Land Amendment, Proposition 102 (1992)

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The Arizona State Trust Land Amendment, also known as Proposition 102 and House Concurrent Resolution 2029, was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment on the statewide ballot in Arizona, which was defeated in the statewide election on November 3, 1992.

  • This proposed amendment to Article X allows the state to exchange State Trust Land for other public or private land of equal or higher value.[1]

Election results

Arizona Proposition 102 (1992)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No720,65053.29%
Yes 631,737 46.71%

Official results via: State of Arizona Official Canvass

Text of measure

The text of the ballot read:

OFFICIAL TITLE

House Concurrent Resolution 2029
A concurrent resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Arizona; amending Article X, Constitution of Arizona, by adding Section 12; relating to state lands.

DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

Amending Arizona Constitution to authorize the state to exchange State Trust Lands for other public or private lands for certain purposes and after public notice if the exchange is in the best interest of the State Land Trust and the state receives land of equal or greater appraised value.[1][2]

Constitutional changes

Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring:
1. Article X, Constitution of Arizona, is proposed to be amended as follows, by adding section 12, if approved by the voters and on proclamation of the Governor:
12. Land exchanges
SECTION 12. A. AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE, THIS STATE MAY EXCHANGE LANDS GRANTED OR CONFIRMED BY THE ENABLING ACT FOR OTHER PUBLIC OR PRIVATE LANDS UNDER SUCH RULES AS THE LEGISLATURE MAY BY LAW PRESCRIBE IF ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS ARE MET:
1. THE EXCHANGE IS IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE STATE LAND TRUST.
2. THE TRUE VALUE, AS DETERMINED BY AT LEAST TWO INDEPENDENT APPRAISALS, OF ANY LANDS RECEIVED IN THE EXCHANGE EQUALS OR EXCEEDS THE TRUE VALUE OF THE LANDS THE STATE EXCHANGES.
3. THE EXCHANGE IS FOR THE PURPOSE OF EITHER:
(a) CONSOLIDATING STATE LAND HOLDINGS TO IMPROVE MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES OR TO INCREASE STATE LAND VALUES.
(b) TRANSFERRING STATE LANDS TO OTHER FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES FOR PUBLIC PURPOSES, INCLUDING PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES.
(c) ACQUIRING LAND THAT IS NEEDED BY THE STATE FOR PUBLIC PURPOSES, INCLUDING PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL VALUES.
B. LAND EXCHANGES ARE NOT CONSIDERED TO BE SALES FOR PURPOSES OF THIS ARTICLE.
C. LAND EXCHANGES INVOLVING FEDERAL LANDS MAY BE MADE ONLY AS AUTHORIZED BY ACTS OF CONGRESS AND FEDERAL REGULATIONS.
2. The Secretary of State shall submit this proposition to the voters at the next general election as provided by Article XXI, Constitution of Arizona.
[1]

Note: Deleted language is crossed out, added language is capitalized.

Path to the ballot

Proposition 102 was placed on the ballot by HCR 2029.[1]
House votes:

  • Ayes - 56
  • Nays - 2
  • Not Voting - 2

Senate votes:

  • Ayes - 29
  • Nays - 0
  • Not Voting - 1

Support

Those in favor of the amendment include:[1]

  • Arizona Tax Research Association
  • Arizona Schools Boards Association
  • Arizona Heritage Alliance
  • Arizona Audubon Council
  • The Nature Conservancy
  • Arizona Farm Bureau
  • Arizona Cattlemen's Association
  • Arizona Mining Association
  • Arizona Citizens Coalition on Resource Decisions

Arguments in favor of the amendment include:[1]

  • In order to get the maximum benefit of the State Trust Lands, the state government must have many options available to the for its use.
  • Many plots of land are located in national parks, recreation areas and wilderness areas and should be exchanged for other land instead of sold at auction.

Opposition

Arguments in opposition of the amendment include:[1]

  • The proposition would allow the state to trade for land that may be appraised incorrectly, hence potentially losing money for the beneficiary of the land sales, public education and institutions.

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 State of Arizona 1992 Ballot Proposition voting guide
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.