SLP Badge Transparent.png
Read the
State Legislative Tracker
New edition available now!




Difference between revisions of "Austin Scott"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(Issues)
Line 106: Line 106:
  
 
==Issues==
 
==Issues==
===American response in Syria===
+
===Presidential preference===
 +
{{presendorsetest|2012|Newt Gingrich}}<ref>[http://teamgingrich.blogspot.com/2011/08/newt-2012-press-release-on-georgia.html ''Team Gingrich,'' "Newt 2012 Press Release on Georgia Endorsements," August 26, 2011]</ref>
 +
 
 +
===Legislative actions===
 +
====113th Congress====
 +
=Overview=
 +
[[File:CongressLogo.png|150px|center|link=Portal:Congress]]
 +
 
 +
{{113thVotes
 +
|Lastname=Scott
 +
|Passed=22
 +
|Total=4315
 +
|Date=August 1, 2013
 +
|Sen=
 +
|SenTotal=
 +
|Ref=<ref>[http://www.senate.gov/reference/resources/pdf/Resumes/current.pdf ''Congressional Record,'' "Resume of Congressional Activity," August 1, 2013]</ref>
 +
}}
 +
 
 +
=National security=
 +
==American response in Syria==
 
: ''See also: [[United States involvement in Syria]]''
 
: ''See also: [[United States involvement in Syria]]''
  
Line 113: Line 132:
 
In a town hall meeting on September 4, 2013, Scott also told constituents he does not plan to support the resolution authorizing U.S. military strikes in Syria.<ref>[http://www.npr.org/2013/09/05/219177442/rep-scott-tired-of-the-u-s-getting-involved-in-others-disputes?ft=1&f=1014 ''NPR.org,'' "Rep. Scott: Tired Of U.S. Getting Involved World's Disputes," accessed September 5, 2013]</ref> In the meeting he said, "Here's what I'll tell you. I'm tired of the U.S. getting involved in every country's individual disputes. As sad as what happened is, I do not intend to support the resolution. The reason I'm hesitant there is I would ask you to give me a little bit of leeway, in that if we have intelligence that shows those chemical weapons being transferred to Hamas, where they could potentially be used against Israel, then I would be in favor of destroying those weapons."<ref>[http://www.npr.org/2013/09/05/219177442/rep-scott-tired-of-the-u-s-getting-involved-in-others-disputes?ft=1&f=1014 ''NPR,'' "Rep. Scott: Tired Of U.S. Getting Involved World's Disputes," accessed September 5, 2013]</ref>
 
In a town hall meeting on September 4, 2013, Scott also told constituents he does not plan to support the resolution authorizing U.S. military strikes in Syria.<ref>[http://www.npr.org/2013/09/05/219177442/rep-scott-tired-of-the-u-s-getting-involved-in-others-disputes?ft=1&f=1014 ''NPR.org,'' "Rep. Scott: Tired Of U.S. Getting Involved World's Disputes," accessed September 5, 2013]</ref> In the meeting he said, "Here's what I'll tell you. I'm tired of the U.S. getting involved in every country's individual disputes. As sad as what happened is, I do not intend to support the resolution. The reason I'm hesitant there is I would ask you to give me a little bit of leeway, in that if we have intelligence that shows those chemical weapons being transferred to Hamas, where they could potentially be used against Israel, then I would be in favor of destroying those weapons."<ref>[http://www.npr.org/2013/09/05/219177442/rep-scott-tired-of-the-u-s-getting-involved-in-others-disputes?ft=1&f=1014 ''NPR,'' "Rep. Scott: Tired Of U.S. Getting Involved World's Disputes," accessed September 5, 2013]</ref>
  
===Presidential preference===
+
=Economy=
{{presendorsetest|2012|Newt Gingrich}}<ref>[http://teamgingrich.blogspot.com/2011/08/newt-2012-press-release-on-georgia.html ''Team Gingrich,'' "Newt 2012 Press Release on Georgia Endorsements," August 26, 2011]</ref>
+
==Fiscal Cliff==
===Specific votes===
+
====Fiscal Cliff====
+
 
{{Oppose vote}}
 
{{Oppose vote}}
 
Scott voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels.  He was 1 of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2012/roll659.xml ''U.S. House'' "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.]</ref>
 
Scott voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels.  He was 1 of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.<ref>[http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2012/roll659.xml ''U.S. House'' "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.]</ref>
 +
 +
=Immigration=
 +
 +
=Healthcare=
 +
 +
=Social issues=
 +
 +
<headertabs/>
  
 
==Elections==
 
==Elections==

Revision as of 12:52, 11 September 2013

Austin Scott
Austin Scott.jpg
U.S. House, Georgia, District 8
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 2011-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 3
PartyRepublican
PredecessorJim Marshall (D)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First electedNovember 2, 2010
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Campaign $$2,181,940
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Georgia House of Representatives, District 153
2005-2011
Georgia House of Representatives, District 138
2003-2005
Georgia House of Representatives, District 165
1996-2003
Education
Bachelor'sUniversity of Georgia
Personal
BirthdayDecember 10, 1969
Place of birthAugusta, Georgia
ProfessionBusiness Executive
Net worth$1,821,618
ReligionSouthern Baptist
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
James Austin Scott (b. December 10, 1969, in Augusta, Georgia) is a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Scott was elected by voters from Georgia's 8th congressional district. He was first elected to the U.S. House in 2010. He was re-elected on November 6, 2012.[1]

He previously represented District 153 of the Georgia House of Representatives from 2005 to 2011, District 138 of the Georgia House of Representatives from 2003 to 2005 and District 165 of the Georgia House of Representatives from 1996 to 2003.[2]

He is set to run for re-election to the U.S. House in 2014. If he runs, he will seek the Republican nomination in the primary election.The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Scott is an average Republican member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Republican Party on the majority of bills.

Biography

Scott graduated from the University of Georgia with a B.B.A. in Risk Management and Insurance.[3]

Career

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Scott serves on the following committees:[4]

  • Agriculture Committee
    • Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight and Nutrition
    • General Farm Commodities and Risk Management
    • Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture, (Chair)
  • Armed Services Committee
    • Subcommittee on Military Personnel
    • Subcommittee on Oversight & Investigations
    • Subcommittee on Readiness

2011-2012

Scott served on the following committees:[5]

  • Agriculture Committee
    • Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management
    • Subcommittee on Rural Development, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture
  • Armed Services Committee
    • Subcommittee on Military Personnel
    • Subcommittee on Readiness
    • Subcommittee on Strategic Forces

Issues

Presidential preference

2012

See also: Endorsements by state officials of presidential candidates in the 2012 election

Austin Scott endorsed Newt Gingrich in the 2012 presidential election. [6]

Legislative actions

113th Congress

[edit]

CongressLogo.png

The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1%) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14% of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[7] For more information pertaining to Scott's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[8]

American response in Syria

See also: United States involvement in Syria

Scott, who serves on the Armed Services Committee, said on September 3, 2013, "In this situation, we must proceed with extreme caution. While I’m concerned with the use of chemical weapons and deeply troubled by the attacks against innocent civilians in Syria, we must have an thoughtful debate over merits, goals and consequences of U.S. military involvement in that country."[9]

In a town hall meeting on September 4, 2013, Scott also told constituents he does not plan to support the resolution authorizing U.S. military strikes in Syria.[10] In the meeting he said, "Here's what I'll tell you. I'm tired of the U.S. getting involved in every country's individual disputes. As sad as what happened is, I do not intend to support the resolution. The reason I'm hesitant there is I would ask you to give me a little bit of leeway, in that if we have intelligence that shows those chemical weapons being transferred to Hamas, where they could potentially be used against Israel, then I would be in favor of destroying those weapons."[11]

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "No" Scott voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was 1 of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257/167 vote on January 1, 2013.[12]

Elections

2014

See also: Georgia's 8th congressional district elections, 2014

Scott is set to run for re-election to the U.S. House in 2014. If he runs, he will seek the Republican nomination in the primary election.The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Georgia's 8th congressional district elections, 2012

Scott ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Georgia's 8th District. Scott sought re-election on the Republican ticket. The signature filing deadline was May 25, 2012, and the primary took place on July 31, 2012. Scott ran unopposed in the Republican primary. He also ran unopposed in the general election on November 6, 2012.

In 2011 redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[13] Scott ranked 5th on the list, and neighboring incumbent Sanford D. Bishop, Jr. ranked 4th on the list.[13] The article notes that in the redistricting process, controlled by a Republican legislature, many African Americans voters were moved from Scott's district into Bishop's2nd congressional district, giving Scott a safe Republican seat, and inadvertently giving Bishop a Democratic boost as well.[13]

U.S. House, Georgia District 8 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngAustin Scott Incumbent 100% 197,789
Total Votes 197,789
Source: Georgia Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Scott is available dating back to 2010. Based on available campaign finance records, Scott raised a total of $2,181,940 during that time period. This information was last updated on April 5, 2013.[15]

Austin Scott's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 U.S. House (Georgia, District 8) Won $1,146,640
2010 U.S. House (Georgia, District 8) Won $1,035,300
Grand Total Raised $2,181,940

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Scott's reports.[16]

Austin Scott (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[17]4/15/2013$307,376.00$113,525.88$(56,292.78)$364,609.10
July Quarterly[18]7/15/2013$364,609.10$217,485.58$(88,066.42)$494,028.26
Running totals
$331,011.46$(144,359.2)

2012

Breakdown of the source of Scott's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Scott won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Scott's campaign committee raised a total of $1,114,640 and spent $761,854.[19] This is less than the average $1.5 million spent by House winners in 2012.[20]

Cost per vote

Scott spent $3.85 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Scott's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Scott won election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that election cycle, Scott's campaign committee raised a total of $1,035,300 and spent $1,024,631.[21]

U.S. House of Representatives, Georgia's 8th Congressional District, 2010 - Austin Scott Campaign Contributions
Total Raised $1,035,300
Total Spent $1,024,631
Total Raised by General Election Opponent $1,496,152
Total Spent by General Election Opponent $1,814,549
Top contributors to Austin Scott's campaign committee
Raines Investments$14,400
Hennessy Automobile$9,600
Select Management Resources$9,600
Med Tech of Georgia$9,420
Every Republican is Crucial PAC$7,000
Top 5 industries that contributed to campaign committee
Leadership PACs$82,050
Health Professionals$81,233
Retired$43,200
Real Estate$33,650
Candidate Committees$30,711

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Scott is a "rank-and-file Republican," as of June 13, 2013.[22]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[23]

Scott most often votes with:

Scott least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Scott missed 20 of 1,695 roll call votes from Jan 2011 to Mar 2013. This amounts to 1.2%, which is better than the median of 2.2% among current congressional representatives as of March 2013.[24]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Scott paid his congressional staff a total of $753,382 in 2011. He ranks 28th on the list of the lowest paid Republican representative staff salaries and ranks 30th overall of the lowest paid representative staff salaries in 2011. Overall, Georgia ranks 24th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[25]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Scott's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $805,630 and $2,837,607. That averages to $1,821,618, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican representatives in 2011 of $7,859,232.[26]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Scott's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $1,173,882 and $2,455,863. That averages to $1,814,872.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican representatives in 2010 of $7,561,133.[27]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Scott ranked 2nd in the conservative rankings in 2012.[28]

2011

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Scott ranked 98th in the conservative rankings.[29]

Voting with party

2013

Austin Scott voted with the Republican Party 97.8% of the time, which ranked 33rd among the 233 House Republican members as of June 2013.[30]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Austin + Scott + Georgia + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

  • Loading...

Personal

Austin lives in Tifton, Georgia with his wife, Vivien, and son, Wells.[31]

External links


References

  1. Politico "2012 House Race Results"
  2. U.S. House "Austin Scott" Accessed June 13, 2013
  3. SCOTT, Austin "Biographical Information" Accessed October 25, 2011
  4. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress"
  5. Congressman Austin Scott:Representing the 8th District of Georgia "Committees and Caucuses" Accessed October 25, 2011
  6. Team Gingrich, "Newt 2012 Press Release on Georgia Endorsements," August 26, 2011
  7. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  8. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  9. AJC.com, "Daily Jolt: Don't assume Isakson's support for Syria strike is a sure thing," accessed Septemeber 5, 2013
  10. NPR.org, "Rep. Scott: Tired Of U.S. Getting Involved World's Disputes," accessed September 5, 2013
  11. NPR, "Rep. Scott: Tired Of U.S. Getting Involved World's Disputes," accessed September 5, 2013
  12. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 The Hill "House members most helped by redistricting" Accessed April 17, 2012
  14. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  15. Open Secrets "Austin Scott" Accessed April 5, 2013
  16. Federal Election Commission "Austin Scott 2014 Summary reports," Accessed July 23, 2013
  17. Federal Election Commission "April Quarterly" Accessed July 23, 2013
  18. Federal Election Commission "July Quarterly" Accessed July 23, 2013
  19. Open Secrets "Austin Scott 2012 Election Cycle," Accessed February 20, 2013
  20. Open Secrets, "Election 2012: The Big Picture Shows Record Cost of Winning a Seat in Congress," June 19, 2013
  21. Open Secrets "Austin Scott 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed October 25, 2011
  22. Gov Track "Austin Scott" Accessed June 13, 2013
  23. OpenCongress, "Rep. Austin Scott," Accessed August 1, 2013
  24. GovTrack, "Austin Scott," Accessed March 29, 2013
  25. LegiStorm "Austin Scott"
  26. OpenSecrets.org, "Scott (R-GA), 2011"
  27. OpenSecrets.org, "Scott, (R-Georgia), 2010"
  28. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 27, 2013
  29. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  30. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  31. Austin Scott: Representing the 8th District of Georgia "Biography" Accessed October 25, 2011
Political offices
Preceded by
Jim Marshall
U.S. House of Representatives - Georgia, District 8
2011–Present
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Georgia House of Representatives, District 165
2005-2011
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Georgia House of Representatives, District 138
2003-2005
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Georgia House of Representatives, District 153
1996-2003
Succeeded by
'