Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Arizona

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Ballot Access Requirements for Candidates
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U.S. House requirements for Independents in 2014
This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Arizona. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Arizona. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included. This page reflects research completed in April 2014.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: Arizona elections, 2014 and Arizona state executive official elections, 2014

Arizona will have a primary election on August 26, 2014 and a general election on November 4, 2014. Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

The 2014 filing deadline for candidates is May 28, 2014. For write-in candidates wishing to participate in the primary election the deadline is July 17, 2014. If they only wish to participate in the general election, their filing deadline is September 25, 2014. The deadline to file paperwork to create a new political party in time for the 2014 elections is February 27, 2014.[1]

Deadline Event
February 27, 2014 Deadline to file paperwork to create a new political party
May 28, 2014 Candidate filing deadline
July 17, 2014 Write-in candidate filing deadline for primary election
August 26, 2014 Primary election date
September 25, 2014 Write-in candidate filing deadline for general election
November 4, 2014 General election

Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of October 2013, there are five recognized political parties in Arizona.[2]

Party Website link By-laws/Platform link
Americans Elect http://azamericanselect.blogspot.com/
Democratic http://azdem.org/ Party platform
Green http://azgp.org/ Party by-laws
Libertarian http://www.azlp.org/ Party platform
Republican http://www.azgop.org/ Party by-laws

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the Nomination Paper for political party candidates running for election in Arizona.
See also: Arizona signature requirements

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Title 16, Chapter 3 of the Arizona Revised Statutes

Candidates in Arizona may access the ballot as political party candidates, as independent candidates or as write-in candidates. Before any candidate, regardless of how they decide to access the ballot, can accept contributions, make expenditures, distribute campaign literature or circulate petitions, they must file a Political Committee Statement of Organization or a $500 Threshold Exemption Statement. All candidates file with the Arizona Secretary of State.[3]

Political party candidates

Political party candidates are nominated at the primary election.[4] If no candidate is elected at the primary election for a specific office, no candidate for that office can appear on the general election ballot for that political party.[5]

Political party candidates must file their nomination documents during the candidate filing period, which begins 120 days before the primary and ends 90 days before the primary. At the time of filing, a candidate must be a qualified elector residing in the geographic area represented by the office sought. The following documents must be filed in order to gain ballot access:[6]

  • A financial disclosure statement
  • An affidavit ascertaining that the candidate will be eligible to hold office if elected
  • A nomination paper including the following information:
    • Candidate’s residence address
    • Name of the party with which the candidate is affiliated
    • Office the candidate seeks, with district or precinct, if applicable
    • The candidate’s name as the candidate wishes it to appear on the ballot
    • Date of the primary and corresponding general election (if successful at the primary) at which the candidate wishes to be elected
  • A nomination petition

Nomination petitions must be signed by qualified electors who are eligible to vote for the office the candidate seeks. To calculate the number of signatures needed to be collected on the petition, the voter registration totals as of March 1 of the year of the election should be used. Look to the table below for signature requirements based on the office sought.[7]

Office sought Minimum signatures required Maximum signatures allowed
U.S. Senator or state executive office At least one-half of one percent of registered voters affiliated with the candidate's political party in three separate counties must sign the petition, but the total number of signatures on the petition must be equal to no less than one-half of one percent of the total statewide voter registration of the candidate's party No more than 10 percent of registered voters affiliated with the candidate's political party statewide
U.S. Representative At least one percent of registered voters affiliated with the candidate's political party in the district the candidate seeks to represent No more than 10 percent of registered voters affiliated with the candidate's political party in the district the candidate seeks to represent
State legislative office At least one percent of registered voters affiliated with the candidate's political party in the district the candidate seeks to represent No more than three percent of registered voters affiliated with the candidate's political party in the district the candidate seeks to represent
Examples of signature requirements for established party candidates
Office sought Political party Total registered voters affiliated with the party in the district as of October 1, 2013[8] Minimum number of signatures needed
State executive office Democratic Party 964,088 4,820
State executive office Republican Party 1,129,845 5,649
Arizona's 1st Congressional District Democratic Party 140,376 702
Arizona State Senate District 1 Republican Party 60,400 302

Newly qualified political party candidates

Newly qualified political party candidates must file all the same documents and at the same time as other political party candidates. The only difference in how they file is how many signatures are needed on their qualifying petitions. Candidates from political parties that have been established for at least one election cycle collect a certain number of signatures depending on voter registration totals. Candidates of newly qualified political parties must instead file signatures equal to at least one-tenth of one percent of the total vote cast for the winning presidential or gubernatorial candidate at the last general election in the district the candidate seeks to represent.[7]

In 2012, 1,233,654 votes were cast for Mitt Romney, the winning presidential candidate in Arizona, meaning that new party candidates seeking state executive office in 2014 would need to collect 1,234 signatures on their qualifying petitions.[9]

Independent candidates

Candidates may not run as independent if they are representing a party that failed to fulfill the requirements to qualify as a party for the primary election, nor can they run if they tried to qualify as a political party candidate for the primary election and failed to submit enough signatures.[10]

Independent candidates may be nominated by petition to run in the general election. The nomination petition may be filed along with the financial disclosure statement during the candidate filing period, which begins 120 days before the primary election and ends 90 days before the primary election.[10]

An independent candidate's nomination petition must be signed by registered voters eligible to vote for the office the candidate seeks who have not signed a political party candidate’s petition. The number of signatures required on the petition is equal to at least three percent of all registered voters who are not affiliated with a recognized political party in the district the candidate seeks to represent. The voter registration totals should be used from calculations as of March 1 of the year of the election. Though the number of signatures required to gain ballot access as an independent is related to the number of registered voters who are not affiliated with recognized political parties, the affiliation of those signing the petitions does not matter as long as they have not already signed a political party candidate's petition.[10]

Write-in candidates

Candidates may not file as write-in candidates if:[11]

  • They ran in the primary election and failed to get elected.
  • They did not file enough signatures to be allowed ballot access when previously filing for primary ballot access.
  • They filed nomination petitions to run in the general election but did not submit enough valid signatures to gain ballot access.

Write-in votes will not be counted unless the candidate written in on the ballot filed a nomination paper and financial disclosure form no later than 5 p.m. on the 40th day before the election in which the candidate seeks to run. The nomination paper must include:[11]

  • The candidate's name and signature
  • The candidate's residence address or description of place of residence and post office address
  • The candidate's age
  • The length of time the candidate has been a resident of the state
  • The candidate's date of birth.

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

Office of the Secretary of State: Oversees candidate filing and reporting and all election procedures.

Capitol Executive Tower, 7th Floor
1700 W. Washington Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007-2808
Telephone: (602) 542-8683
Fax: (602) 542-1575
http://www.azsos.gov/

Citizens Clean Elections Commission: Administers alternative campaign financing system for candidates who choose to participate and oversees contribution limits for all candidates.

1616 W. Adams, Suite 110
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Telephone: 602-364-3477
Fax: 602-364-3487
Email: ccec@azcleanelections.gov
http://www.azcleanelections.gov/home.aspx

Term limits

Arizona state executives and legislators have term limits. These limits were established by Propsition 107, which was passed by voters in 1992 to amend Section 1, Article 5 of the Arizona Constitution.

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits and States with gubernatorial term limits

The state executive term limits in Arizona are as follows:[12]

See also: Arizona state executive official elections, 2014

The state executives who are term-limited in 2014 are:

Name Party Office
Jan Brewer Ends.png Republican Governor
Ken Bennett Ends.png Republican Secretary of State
Gary Pierce Ends.png Republican Corporation Commissioner

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

A politician in Arizona may serve no more than four consecutive terms (equivalent to eight years) in either the Arizona State Senate or the Arizona House of Representatives.[13]

2014

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

No state senators will be termed out in 2014, but three state representatives will be termed out.

  • Democratic Party 1 Democratic Representative
  • Republican Party 2 Republican Representatives

They are:

Name Party Chamber District
Andy Tobin Ends.png Republican State House District 1
John Kavanagh Ends.png Republican State House District 23
Chad Campbell Electiondot.png Democratic State House District 24

2012

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012

A total of seven state legislators were termed out in 2012.

  • State Senate: 2
    • Democratic Party 0 Democratic senators
    • Republican Party 2 Republican senators
  • State House: 5
    • Democratic Party 0 Democratic Representatives
    • Republican Party 5 Republican Representatives

2010

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2010 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2010

A total of 23 state legislators were termed out in 2010.

  • State Senate: 10
    • Democratic Party 4 Democratic senators
    • Republican Party 6 Republican senators
  • State House: 13
    • Democratic Party 5 Democratic Representatives
    • Republican Party 8 Republican Representatives

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Arizona and List of United States Senators from Arizona

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Arizona:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Arizona
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 0 5 5
     Republican Party 2 4 6
TOTALS as of July 2014 2 9 11

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Arizona:

State Senate

Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 13
     Republican Party 17
Total 30

State house

Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 24
     Republican Party 36
Total 60

See also

External links

Forms

References