Ballot access requirements for political candidates in New York

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See also
This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of New York. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in New York. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included. This page reflects research completed in April 2014.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: New York elections, 2014

New York will have a primary election for federal candidates on June 24, 2014, a primary election for state candidates on September 9, 2014, and a general election on November 4, 2014. Petitions for independent candidates seeking U.S. House seats will be due August 5, 2014. Petitions for independent candidates seeking any other office will be due August 19, 2014.[1][2] Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

NOTE: Due to court order, the primary election for federal offices will occur in June 2014. As of February 2014, the State Board of Elections had not published a comprehensive calendar for 2014 elections for state office. Consequently, filing deadlines for party candidates for state office are uncertain and thus not included in the calendar below. Filing deadlines for independent candidates for state office are known and included in the calendar below. Campaign finance report due dates for 2014 had also not been published as of February 2014. This calendar will be updated as information becomes available.[1][2]

Legend:      Ballot Access     Campaign Finance     Election Date




Dates and requirements for candidates in 2014
Deadline Event type Event description
March 4, 2014 Ballot access First day to circulate designating petitions for the federal primary
March 25, 2014 Ballot access First day to sign an opportunity to ballot petition for the federal primary
April 10, 2014 Ballot access Deadline to file designating petitions for the federal primary
April 17, 2014 Ballot access Last day to file an opportunity to ballot petition for the federal primary
June 24, 2014 Election date Federal primary election
June 24, 2014 Ballot access First day to circulate nominating petitions for independent candidates for federal office
July 8, 2014 Ballot access First day to circulate nominating petitions for independent candidates for state office
August 5, 2014 Ballot access Deadline to file nominating petitions for independent candidates for federal office
August 19, 2014 Ballot access Deadline to file nominating petitions for independent candidates for state office
September 9, 2014 Election date State primary election
November 4, 2014 Election date General election

Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of October 2013, there are six recognized political parties in New York.

Party Website link By-laws/platform link
Republican Party Official party website Party platform
Conservative Party Official party website Party platform
Democratic Party Official party website
Working Families Party Official party website
Green Party Official party website Party platform
Independence Party Official party website

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. New York[3][4] does allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.{{{Reference}}}

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[5]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Article 6, Section 128 of the New York Election Law

In New York, a political party is defined as any political organization whose candidate for governor at the last preceding election polled at least 50,000 votes.[6] New York is one of 11 states that do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, political organizations seeking party status must run a candidate for governor via the independent nomination process (see "Process to become a candidate" below for more information). The organization may denote its name on the nominating petition, which will then appear alongside the candidate's name on the ballot. The name selected must be rendered in English and cannot suggest similarity to an existing party or a political organization that has already filed.[7] If at the general election the organization's candidate for governor wins at least 50,000 votes, the organization will then be recognized by the state as a political party.

Procedural requirements

State laws stipulate that a party must form state and county committees. At their discretion and in accordance with their own rules, parties may also form other committees.[8] Committees may prepare rules for governing the party within the committee's political unit (i.e., state or county). Within 10 days of adopting or amending any rule, a certified copy of the rule must be filed with the State Board of Elections and, in the case of county committees, the applicable county board of elections.[9]

First nominations by a newly recognized party

The first nominations made by a newly qualified political party (i.e., nominations for elections up to and including the first general election occurring after the party first qualifies) must be made by certificate of nomination, in accordance with the party's established rules. Certificates of nomination must be filed with the same office and in the same manner as designating petitions (see "Process to become a candidate" below for more information).[10]

Thereafter, provided it maintains qualified status, the party will make nominations for office via primary election.[11]

Maintaining party status

Political parties must field candidates for governor in each gubernatorial election who win at least 50,000 votes in order to maintain qualified status.[6] In the event that a party's candidate for governor fails to win the requisite votes, the party must re-qualify for recognition.

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the Designating Petition Form for candidates.
Quick facts about Lieutenant Governors
  • 45 states have Lt. governors, 43 of them fill the office by election
  • 21 states elect Lt. governors on a single ticket with the governor at both the primary and general elections
  • 5 states, including New York, elect Lt. governors separately from Governors at the primary and then put the top two vote-getters together on the general election ballot
  • 17 states elect Lt. governors separately from the Governor

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Article 6 of the New York Election Law

For party candidates

Party candidates seeking access to the primary ballot must be nominated via designating petitions.[12][13] The substance of the petition is established by statute and sample forms are provided by the State Board of Elections.[14] Only enrolled party members may sign a designating petitions and only enrolled party members may be designated for the primary.[14][15] A party may nominate a non-enrolled member by filing a certificate of authorization, signed by the presiding officer and secretary of the meeting at which such authorization is given.[15] Signature requirements vary according to office. Generally speaking, candidates must collect signatures equaling at least five percent of the active enrolled voters of the political unit (e.g., the state for statewide offices, such as governor; the legislative district for state senate or assembly districts; etc.) or a fixed total established by statute, whichever is less. The following table provides examples of signature requirements for 2014:[16]

2014 signature requirements[17][18][19]
Office 5% of the political unit's active enrolled voters Statutory total Lesser of 5% of enrolled voters or statutory total
Governor** 550,835 15,000 15,000
Attorney General** 550,835 15,000 15,000
Comptroller** 550,835 15,000 15,000
U.S. House District 1 22,344 1,250 1,250
State Senate District 1 10,255 1,000 1,000
Assembly District 1 4,227 500 500
**Designating petitions for statewide office must include signatures equaling either five percent or 100 total from each of one-half of the state's congressional districts (whichever is less).[12]

Designating petitions must be submitted to the appropriate county board of elections, with the following exceptions:[20]

  • If the political unit of the office being sought lies entirely within New York City, the petition must be filed with the city board of elections.
  • If the political unit of the office being sought comprises more than one county or portions of two or more counties, the petition must be filed with the State Board of Elections.

Designating petitions must be filed between the 10th Monday and ninth Tuesday prior to the primary election. A candidate must file a certificate of acceptance or declination of the designation no later than the fourth day after the last day to file designating petitions.[21]

On May 10, 2014, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law a bill that extended the primary petition period from 37 to 42 days. The bill only applies to the 2014 election.[22]

Enrolled party members may also circulate petitions to allow for the opportunity to write in a candidate for an office for which there is no contest for the party nomination at the primary. These are called "opportunity to ballot" petitions and are substantially the same as designating petitions (i.e., the petitions are held to the same signature and filing requirements, etc.), except that they do not require a candidate to be named.[12][23]

For independent candidates

Independent candidates seeking access to the general election ballot must be nominated via nominating petition. The substance of the petition is established by statute and sample forms are provided by the State Board of Elections.[12][24] The group of voters making the nomination may designate a name for themselves, provided the name is rendered in English and does not suggest similarity with an existing political party or a political organization that has already filed a nominating petition.[7] Signature requirements vary according to office. Generally speaking, candidates must collect signatures equaling at least five percent of the total number of votes cast for governor within the political unit at the last gubernatorial election or a fixed total established by statute, whichever is less. The following table provides examples of signature requirements for 2014:[25]

2014 signature requirements
Office Signatures required
Governor** 15,000
Attorney General** 15,000
Comptroller** 15,000
U.S. House District 1 5% of the total vote cast for governor within the district at the last gubernatorial election, not to exceed 3,500
State Senate District 1 5% of the total vote cast for governor within the district at the last gubernatorial election, not to exceed 3,000
Assembly District 1 5% of the total vote cast for governor within the district at the last gubernatorial election, not to exceed 1,500
**Designating petitions for statewide office must include 100 signatures from each of one-half of the state's congressional districts.[25][12]
***The signature requirement for statewide candidates is set by statute at a fixed total.[25]

Nominating petitions must be submitted to the appropriate county board of elections, with the following exceptions:[20]

  • If the political unit of the office being sought lies entirely within New York City, the petition must be filed with the city board of elections.
  • If the political unit of the office being sought comprises more than one county or portions of two or more counties, the petition must be filed with the State Board of Elections.

Nominating petitions must be filed between the 12th and 11th week prior to the general election. A candidate must file a certificate of acceptance or declination of the designation no later than the third day after the last day to file nominating petitions.[21]

Write-in candidates

Write-in candidates for president or vice-president must file a certificate of candidacy with the State Board of Elections.[26] Write-in candidates for other federal or state offices do not have to submit any filing paperwork.

Fusion voting

New York is one of eight states that allow "electoral fusion," meaning that more than one political party can support the same candidate. This can result in one candidate appearing multiple times on the same ballot for the same position. While electoral fusion was once widespread across the United States, it is now commonly practiced only in New York.[27]

Petition requirements

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process to gain access to the ballot. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators in New York.

Form and content

The contents of candidate petitions are established by statute. Generally speaking, candidate petitions must include the following information:[28][29][30][31]

  • Date of the election
  • Name of the candidate and the office sought
  • Candidate's residential address and, if applicable, mailing or post office address
  • For each signer: signature, date of signing, and residential address

Voters are required to affix their signatures personally to the petition. Other information may be filled in by someone else. All pages must be sequentially numbered and securely fastened.[31][30]

If a petition contains more than 10 pages, a cover sheet must be included. Cover sheets must include the following information:[31]

  • Name, residential address (and mailing address, if applicable) of the candidate
  • Office sought
  • Name of the party or independent body making the nomination
  • A statement indicating that the petition contains signatures equal to or greater than the number required by law

Witness to a petition

Petitions must include a witness statement indicating that each signature made to the petition sheet was made in the presence of the witness. Only individuals qualified to sign a petition may serve as a witness to it.[31][32]

Petition challenges

A registered voter can challenge the validity of a petition. General objections must be filed in writing within three days after the petition is filed. Specific objections must be filed within six of filing the general objections. For petitions filed with the State Board of Elections, challengers must serve the candidate with a copy of the specific objections and submit proof of serving such notice to the State Board of Elections.[31][33]

Campaign finance

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Article 14 of the New York Election Law

Candidates for statewide and state legislative office must disclose all campaign receipts and expenditures, including personal money, to the State Board of Elections. Candidates may comply with reporting requirements in one of three ways:[34][35]

1.) The candidate may choose to file on his or her own behalf
The candidate is responsible for filing his or her own campaign finance reports. The candidate must also disclose the name and address of the bank at which he or she keeps the account used to conduct campaign financial activity. The candidate must file a "Candidate Campaign Finance Registration Form to Request NYSBOE Filer ID# and PIN (CF-04)" form.[34][35]
2.) The candidate may use an authorized committee to file reports
A candidate may elect to authorize a committee to fulfill all his or her campaign's finance filing requirements. The candidate must submit a "Candidate's Authorization for a Committee to Make All Campaign Financial Disclosures (CF-16)" form. Choosing to file in this way does not absolve the candidate of responsibility or liability for the campaign's financial activities. The CF-16 form must be submitted no later than 32 days prior to the first election for which the candidate would be required to file reports.[34][35]
3.) Both the candidate and authorized committee file reports
Both the candidate and the authorized committee must register and file separate reports, although the candidate does not need to submit a CF-16 form if he or she elects to file reports in this manner.[34][35]

Candidates may claim an exemption from filing requirements if they have not and will not receive or spend more than $50 for campaign purposes (this includes personal funds). Candidates seeking exemption must file a "Candidate or Committee Claim of Exemption from Filing Campaign Financial Disclosure Reports (CF-05)" form.[34][36]

Authorized candidate committees must file a "Committee Registration/Treasurer and Bank Information Form (CF-02)," which notes the committee's name, type, treasurer, bank or financial depository, and candidate supported. This form must be filed within five days of choosing a treasurer and depository and prior to receiving any contributors or making any expenditures. The committee must also submit a "Committee Authorization Status Form (CF-03)," which notes whether the committee has been authorized by the candidate the committee is supporting.[34][37][38]

Campaign finance reports must include the following types of information:[34]

  • Contributions
    • Includes both monetary and in-kind contributions, as well as other receipts (interest payments, proceeds from a sale or lease, etc.)
  • Expenditures
    • Includes payments made for goods or services rendered, reimbursements to individuals, and reimbursements for credit card expenses
  • Transfers
    • Includes transfers between a party or committee and a candidate or his or her authorized committee
  • Loans, liabilities, refunds
    • Includes loans received, loan repayments, loans or liabilities that have been forgiven, refunds (both those that increase cash balance, such as return of deposits, refunds from overpayment, etc., and those that decrease cash balance, such as refunded contributions)

When a contributor makes a contribution that is either greater than $99 by itself or causes the contributor's aggregate contributions for the election cycle to exceed $99, the contributions must be itemized and the contributor's name and address must be noted. When a single expenditure exceeds $49.99, it must be itemized and the name and address of the payee and the amount, date, and purpose of the expenditure must be noted.[34]

Campaign finance report filings must be made electronically either via diskette, CD, DVD or email attachment, using the State Board of Election's Electronic Filing System (EFS) software.[34]

There are three types of campaign financial disclosure reports that must be filed during each election (primary, general and special) in which the candidate or committee participates.[34][39][40]

Campaign finance report dates for primary elections
Report type Deadline to file
First pre-primary report 32nd day prior to the primary
Second pre-primary report 11th day prior to the primary
Post-primary report 10th day following the primary
Campaign finance report dates for general and special elections
Report type Deadline to file
First pre-general/special report 32nd day prior to the election
Second pre-general/special report 11th day prior to the election
Post-general/special report 27th day following the election

When a contribution or loan over $1,000 is received after the cut-off date for the second pre-election report, a special notice must be filed within 24 hours of receipt.[34]

Contribution limits

An individual may contribute up to $150,000 in aggregate per calendar year, but candidates are subject to contribution receipt limits, which are detailed in the table below.[34][41] The table's last two columns indicate contributor type ("family" refers to the candidate's immediate family, not including the candidate's spouse).

Candidate contribution receipt limits
Office sought Election type Non-family limit Family limit
Statewide offices, such as Governor, Attorney General, Comptroller Primary Total number of active enrolled voters in the candidate's party in the state multiplied by $0.005 (at least $6,500, but no more than $19,700) Total number of active enrolled voters in the candidate's party in the state multiplied by $0.025
Statewide offices, such as Governor, Attorney General, Comptroller General $41,100 Total number of active enrolled voters in the candidate's party in the state multiplied by $0.025
State Senate Primary $6,500 Total number of active enrolled voters in the candidate’s party in the district multiplied by $0.25 (at least $20,000, but no more than $100,000)
State Senate General $10,300 Total number of active enrolled voters in the candidate’s party in the district multiplied by $0.25 (at least $20,000, but no more than $100,000)
State Assembly Primary $4,100 Total number of active enrolled voters in the candidate’s party in the district multiplied by $0.25 (at least $12,500, but no more than $100,000)
State Assembly General $4,100 Total number of active enrolled voters in the candidate’s party in the district multiplied by $0.25 (at least $12,500, but no more than $100,000)

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

  • New York State Board of Elections
Why: To file petitions for select congressional and state legislature seats (contact county-level boards of election for further details -- see below for contact information)[42]
40 Steuben St.
Albany, NY 12207-2108
Main phone: 518.474.6220
TDD/TYY: Dial 711

Counties

See also: Counties in New York

A candidate must file a number of documents with the county elections office in the county he or she resides in. Individual county contact information can be found below.

New York county contact information
County Email Phone Fax Website Physical address Mailing address
Albany County Board of Elections boardofelections@albanycounty.com 518-487-5060 518-487-5077 Link 32 North Russell Road. Albany, NY 12206
Allegany County Board of Elections ACBOE@alleganyco.com 585-268-9294 585-268-9406 Link 6 Schuyler Street Belmont, NY 14813
Broome County Board of Elections bcboe@co.broome.ny.us 607-778-2172 607-778-2174 Link Broome County Board of Elections 60 Hawley St., Government Plaza P.O. Box 1766 Binghamton, NY 13902
Cattaraugus County Board of Elections BOE-Support@cattco.org 716-938-2400 716-938-2775 Link Cattaraugus County Board of Elections 302 Court St. Little Valley, NY 14755
Cayuga County Board of Elections election@cayugacounty.us 315-253-1285 315-253-1289 Link Cayuga County Board of Elections 157 Genesee Street (Basement) Auburn, NY 13021
Chautauqua County Board of Elections vote@co.chautauqua.ny.us 716-753-4580 716-753-4111 Link Chautauqua County Board of Elections 7 North Erie Street Mayville, NY 14757
Chemung County Board of Elections votechemung@co.chemung.ny.us 607-737-5475 607-737-5499 Link 378 So. Main Street P.O. Box 588 Elmira, NY 14902-0588
Chenango County Board of Elections boe@co.chenango.ny.us 607-337-1760 607-337-1766 Link 5 Court Street Norwich, NY 13815
Clinton County Board of Elections boe@co.clinton.ny.us 518-565-4740 518-565-4508 Link Co. Government Center. Suite 104 137 Margaret Street Plattsburgh, NY 12901
Columbia County Board of Elections elections@columbiacountyny.com 518-828-3115 518-828-2624 Link 401 State St. Hudson, NY 12534
Cortland County Board of Elections elections@cortland-co.org 607-753-5032 607-758-5513 Link 112 River Street - Suite 1 Cortland, NY 13045-2828
Delaware County Board of Elections boe.move@co.delaware.ny.us 607-746-2315 607-746-6516 Link 3 Gallant Ave. Delhi, NY 13753
Dutchess County Board of Elections dutchesselections@dutchessny.gov 845-486-2473 845-486-2483 Link 47 Cannon St. Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
Erie County Board of Elections 716-858-8891 (716) 858-8282 Link 134 West Eagle St. Buffalo, NY 14202
Essex County Board of Elections essexelections@co.essex.ny.us 518-873-3474 518-873-3479 Link 7551 Court Street Elizabethtown, NY 12932 P. O. Box 217 Elizabethtown, NY 12932
Franklin County Board of Elections boe@co.franklin.ny.us 518-481-1663 518-481-6018 Link 355 West Main Street - Suite 161 Malone, NY 12953-1823
Fulton County Board of Elections boe@co.fulton.ny.us 518-736-5526 518-736-1612 Link 2714 STHWY 29, Suite 1 Johnstown, NY 12095-9946
Genesee County Board of Elections election@co.genesee.ny.us 585-344-2550 585-344-8562 Link County Building One 15 Main Street - P.O. Box 284 Batavia, NY 14021
Greene County Board of Elections elections@discovergreene.com 518-719-3550 518-719-3784 Link 411 Main Street, Suite 437 Catskill, NY 12414
Hamilton County Board of Elections elections@hamiltoncountyny.gov 518-548-4684 518-548-6345 Link Hamilton County Board of Elections Route 8 Lake Pleasant, NY 12108 P. O. Box 175 Lake Pleasant, NY 12108
Herkimer County Board of Elections boeinfo@herkimercounty.org 315-867-1102 315-867-1106 Link 109 Mary Street, Suite 1306 Herkimer, NY 13350
Jefferson County Board of Elections babetteh@co.jefferson.ny.us 315-785-3027 315-785-5197 Link 175 Arsenal St. Watertown, NY 13601
Lewis County Board of Elections elections@lewiscountyny.org 315-376-5329 315-376-2860 Link 7660 N. State Street Lowville, NY 13367
Livingston County Board of Elections election@co.livingston.ny.us 585-243-7090 585-243-7015 Link County Government Center 6 Court Street, Room 104 Geneseo, NY 14454-1043
Madison County Board of Elections BOEcommissioners@madisoncounty.ny.gov 315-366-2231 315-366-2532 Link North Court Street - County Office Bldg. Wampsville, NY 13163 P. O. Box 666 Wampsville, NY 13163
Monroe County Board of Elections FederalAbsenteeBallot@monroecounty.gov 585-753-1550 585-324-1612 Link 39 Main St. West Rochester, NY 14614
Montgomery County Board of Elections boe@co.montgomery.ny.us 518-853-8180 518-853-8392 Link Old Courthouse, 9 Park Street Fonda, NY 12068-1500 P. O. Box 1500 Fonda, NY 12068-1500
Nassau County Board of Elections fedmil@nassaucountyny.gov 516-571-2411 516-571-2058 Link 240 Old Country Road - 5th Floor Mineola, NY 11501
New York City Board of Elections voterreg@boe.nyc.ny.us 212-886-2100 1.718.459.3384 Link 200 Varick Street - 10th Floor New York, NY 10014
Kings County Board of Elections voterreg@boe.nyc.ny.us 718-797-8800 718-246-5958 Link 345 Adams Street - 4th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201
New York County Board of Elections voterreg@boe.nyc.ny.us 212-886-2100 Link New York County Board of Elections 200 Varick Street - 10th Floor New York, NY 10014
Queens County Board of Elections voterreg@boe.nyc.ny.us 718-730-6730 Link Queens County Board of Elections 126-06 Queens Boulevard Kew Gardens, NY 11415
Richmond County Board of Elections voterreg@boe.nyc.ny.us 718-876-0079 Link Richmond County Board of Elections 1 Edgewater Plaza Staten Island, NY 10305
Niagara County Board of Elections ncboe@niagaracounty.com 716-438-4040 716-438-4054 Link 111 Main Street, Suite 100 Lockport, NY 14094
Oneida County Board of Elections BoardofElections@ocgov.net 315-798-5765 315-798-6412 Link Union Station 321 Main Street - 3rd Floor Utica, NY 13501
Onondaga County Board of Elections elections@ongov.net 315-435-3312 315-435-8451 Link 1000 Erie Boulevard West Syracuse, NY 13204
Ontario County Board of Elections BOE@co.ontario.ny.us 585-396-4005 585-393-2941 Link 74 Ontario Street Canandaigua, NY 14424
Orange County Board of Elections elections@orangecountygov.com 845-291-2444 845-291-2437 Link 25 Court Lane, P.O. Box 30 Goshen, NY 10924
Orleans County Board of Elections Dennis.Piedimonte@orleansny.com 585-589-3274 (585) 589-2771 Link 14012 State Route 31 Albion, NY 14411
Oswego County Board of Elections datkins@oswegocounty.com, pbickford@oswegocounty.com 315-349-8350 315-349-8357 Link 185 E. Seneca Street, Box 9 Oswego, NY 13126
Otsego County Board of Elections boe_move@otsegocounty.com 607-547-4247 607-547-4248 Link Suite 2 140 County Highway 33W Cooperstown, NY 13326
Putnam County Board of Elections PutnamCountyElections@putnamcountyny.gov 845-808-1300 845-808-1920 Link 25 Old Route 6 Carmel, NY 10512
Rensselaer County Board of Elections RenscoBOE@rensco.com 518-270-2990 518-270-2909 Link Ned Pattison Government Center 1600 Seventh Ave. Troy, NY 12180
Rockland County Board of Elections RCMOVE@co.rockland.ny.us 845-638-5172 845-638-5196 Link 11 New Hempstead Road New City, NY 10956
Saratoga County Board of Elections elections@saratogacountyny.gov 518-885-2249 518-884-4751 Link 50 W. High St. Ballston Spa, NY 12020
Schenectady County Board of Elections schenectadyboe@gmail.com 518-377-2469 518-377-2716 Link 388 Broadway - Suite E Schenectady, NY 12305-2520
Schoharie County Board of Elections boe@co.schoharie.ny.us 518-295-8388 518-295-8419 Link County Office Bldg. - 284 Main Street Schoharie, NY 12157 P. O. Box 99 Schoharie, NY 12157
Schuyler County Board of Elections elections@co.schuyler.ny.us 607-535-8195 607-535-8364 Link County Office Building 105 9th Street, Unit 13 Watkins Glen, NY 14891-9972
Seneca County Board of Elections boe@co.seneca.ny.us 315-539-1760 315-539-3710 Link One DiPronio Drive Waterloo, NY 13165
St. Lawrence County Board of Elections JBacon@stlawco.org, TNICHOLS@STLAWCO.ORG 315-379-2202 315-386-2737 Link 48 Court Street Canton, NY 13617
Steuben County Board of Elections elections@co.steuben.ny.us 607-664-2260 607-664-2376 Link Steuben County Board of Elections 3 E. Pulteney Square Bath, NY 14810
Suffolk County Board of Elections BOEinfo@suffolkcountyny.gov 631-852-4500 631-852-4590 Link Yaphank Avenue P. O. Box 700 Yaphank, NY 11980
Sullivan County Board of Elections scboe@co.sullivan.ny.us 845-807-0400 845-807-0410 Link Sullivan County Board of Elections Government Center, 100 North Street Monticello, NY 12701-5192 P. O. Box 5012 Monticello, NY 12701-5192
Tioga County Board of Elections votetioga@co.tioga.ny.us 607-687-8261 607-687-6348 Link County Office Building 56 Main Street Owego, NY 13827
Tompkins County Board of Elections movehelp@tompkins-co.org 607-274-5522 607-274-5533 Link Court House Annex 128 E. Buffalo Street Ithaca, NY 14850
Ulster County Board of Elections elections@co.ulster.ny.us 845-334-5470 845-334-5434 Link 284 Wall Street Kingston, NY 12401
Warren County Board of Elections boe@warrencountyny.gov 518-761-6456 518-761-6480 Link Co. Municipal Ctr. 3rd Fl.- Human Serv. 1340 State Route 9 Lake George, NY 12845
Washington County Board of Elections boardofelections@co.washington.ny.us 518-746-2180 518-746-2179 Link 383 Broadway Fort Edward, NY 12828
Wayne County Board of Elections elections@co.wayne.ny.us 315-946-7400 315-946-7409 Link 7376 State Route 31 Lyons, NY 14489 P. O. Box 636 Lyons, NY 14489
Westchester County Board of Elections BOEWest@westchestergov.com 914-995-5700 914-995-3190 Link 25 Quarropas Street White Plains, NY 10601
Wyoming County Board of Elections boewyoming@wyomingco.net 585-786-8931 585-786-8843 Link 4 Perry Avenue Warsaw, NY 14569
Yates County Board of Elections boardofelections@yatescounty.org 315-536-5135 315-536-5523 Link Suite 1124 417 Liberty Street Penn Yan, NY 14527

Term limits

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits and States with gubernatorial term limits

There are no state executive term limits in New York.

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

There are no term limits placed on New York state legislators.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from New York and List of United States Senators from New York

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from New York:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from New York
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 2 21 23
     Republican Party 0 6 6
TOTALS as of November 2014 2 27 29

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of New York:

Senate

Party As of November 2014
     Democratic Party 32
     Republican Party 29
     Vacancy 2
Total 63

Note: Although Democrats have a numerical majority, a coalition gives Republicans control of the chamber.

House

Party As of November 2014
     Democratic Party 99
     Republican Party 40
     Vacancy 11
Total 150


See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

News

Other information

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Ballot Access News "New York Will Have Different 2014 Petition Deadlines for Independent Candidates for U.S. House than for Other Office," January 27, 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 New York State Board of Elections "Court Ordered Political Calendar for the 2014 Federal Primary and General Elections," accessed January 27, 2014
  3. State of New York 2008 Election Law "Article 6, Title 1, Section 138," accessed December 5, 2013
  4. State of New York 2008 Election Law "Article 7, Title 1, Section 104," accessed December 5, 2013
  5. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
  6. 6.0 6.1 New York Election Law, "Article 1, Section 104," accessed February 13, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 138," accessed February 12, 2014
  8. New York Election Law, "Article 2, Section 100," accessed February 13, 2014
  9. New York Election Law, "Article 2, Section 114," accessed February 13, 2014
  10. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 128," accessed February 13, 2014
  11. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 110," accessed February 13, 2014
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 New York State Board of Elections, "Running for Elective Office," accessed February 13, 2014
  13. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 118," accessed February 13, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 132," accessed February 13, 2014
  15. 15.0 15.1 New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 120," accessed February 13, 2014
  16. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 136," accessed February 13, 2014
  17. New York State Board of Elections, "Voter Enrollment by Congressional District, Party Affiliation and Status as of November 1, 2013," accessed February 13, 2014
  18. New York State Board of Elections, "Voter Enrollment by 41st Senate District, Party Affiliation and Status as of November 1, 2013," accessed February 13, 2014
  19. New York State Board of Elections, "Voter Enrollment by Assembly District, Party Affiliation and Status as of November 1, 2013," accessed February 13, 2014
  20. 20.0 20.1 New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 144," accessed February 13, 2014
  21. 21.0 21.1 New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 158," accessed February 13, 2014
  22. Ballot Access News, "New York Legislature Passes Bill Extending Primary Petitioning Period from 37 Days to 42 Days, for 2014 Only," May 10, 2014
  23. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 164," accessed February 13, 2014
  24. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 140," accessed February 13, 2014
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 142," accessed February 13, 2014
  26. New York Election Law, "Article 6, 153," accessed February 13, 2014
  27. Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, "More Choices, More Voices: A Primer on Fusion," October 2, 2006
  28. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 130," accessed February 14, 2014
  29. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 138," accessed February 12, 2014
  30. 30.0 30.1 New York Election Laws, "Article 6, Section 134," accessed February 14, 2014
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 31.3 31.4 New York State Board of Elections, "Running for Elective Office," accessed February 13, 2014
  32. New York Election Law, "Article 6, Section 132," accessed February 13, 2014
  33. New York Election Laws, "Article 6, Section 154," accessed February 14, 2014
  34. 34.00 34.01 34.02 34.03 34.04 34.05 34.06 34.07 34.08 34.09 34.10 34.11 New York State Board of Elections, "Campaign Finance Handbook 2013," accessed February 13, 2014
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 35.3 New York Election Law, "Article 14, Section 104," accessed February 13, 2014
  36. New York Election Law, "Article 14, Section 124," accessed February 13, 2014
  37. New York Election Law, "Article 14, Section 118," accessed February 13, 2014
  38. New York Election Law, "Article 14, Section 112," accessed February 13, 2014
  39. New York Election Law, "Article 14, Section 108," accessed February 13, 2014
  40. New York Election Law, "Article 14, Section 108," accessed February 13, 2014
  41. New York Election Law, "Article 14, Section 114," accessed February 13, 2014
  42. New York Board of Elections "Running for Office," accessed December 5, 2013