Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Rhode Island

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Ballot Access Requirements for Candidates
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This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Rhode Island. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Rhode Island. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included. This page reflects research completed in April 2014.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: Rhode Island elections, 2014

Rhode Island will hold a primary election on September 9, 2014 and a general election on November 4, 2014. Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

The deadline to submit paperwork to create a new political party that will nominate candidates in the primary election was June 1, 2014 (for new parties not nominating their candidates via primary, the deadline is August 1, 2014). Candidates had to file Declarations of Candidacy by June 25, 2014. Nomination papers are made available to candidates on July 1, 2014. Candidates must submit nomination papers to local boards of canvassers on July 11, 2014. The table below summarizes important ballot access, campaign finance, and election dates for 2014.

Legend:      Ballot Access     Campaign Finance     Election Date




Dates and requirements for candidates in 2014
Deadline Event type Event description
April 30, 2014 Campaign finance 1st on-going quarterly report**
June 1, 2014 Ballot access Deadline to submit paperwork to create a new political party that will nominate candidates in the primary
June 25, 2014 Ballot access Deadline for candidates to file a Declaration of Candidacy form
July 1, 2014 Ballot access Nomination papers are made available for election officials
July 11, 2014 Ballot access Deadline for candidates to submit nomination papers to local boards of canvassers
July 31, 2014 Campaign finance 2nd on-going quarterly report**
August 1, 2014 Ballot access Deadline to submit paperwork to create a new political party that will nominate candidates in the primary
August 12, 2014 Campaign finance 28 days pre-primary report**
September 2, 2014 Campaign finance 7 days pre-primary report**
September 9, 2014 Election date State primary date
October 7, 2014 Campaign finance 28 days pre-election report/7 days post-primary report**
October 28, 2014 Campaign finance 7 days pre-election report**
October 31, 2014 Campaign finance 3rd on-going quarterly report**
November 4, 2014 Election date General election
December 2, 2014 Campaign finance 28 days post-election report**
February 2, 2015 Campaign finance 4th on-going quarterly report**
** Campaign finance reporting requirements vary according to the candidate's level of participation in each election. For more detailed information, see "Campaign finance" below.

Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of October 2013, there are three recognized political parties in Rhode Island.

Party Website link By-laws/platform link
Republican Party Official party website
Democratic Party Official party website Party by-laws
Moderate Party Official party website

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. Rhode Island[1] does allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[2]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Rhode Island General Laws, Title 17, Section 17-1-2

A political party in Rhode Island is defined as any one of the following:[3]

  1. Any political organization that at the most recent general election for the election of general officers (e.g., Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, etc.) nominated a candidate for governor who polled at least five percent of the entire vote cast for that office. In 2010, for example, a total of 342,290 were cast for Governor, meaning that a party would have had to field a candidate for that office who received at least 17,115 votes in order for the party to maintain state recognition.[4]
  2. Any political organization that at the most recent presidential election nominated a candidate for President who received at least five percent of the entire vote cast in the state for that office. In 2012, for example, a total of 446,049 were cast for President in Rhode Island, meaning that a party would have had to field a candidate for that office who received at least 22,303 votes in order for the party to maintain state recognition.[5]
  3. Any political organization that petitions for recognition as a political party.

An organization petitioning for recognition as a political party must collect signatures from registered, qualified voters equaling at least five percent of the total vote cast for Governor or President at the last immediately preceding general election. Based on 2012 presidential election results, for example, an organization would need to collect a total of 22,303 signatures in order to qualify for party status. Signatures cannot be collected prior to January 1 of the year in which the organization desires ballot access as a political party. An organization qualifying as a political party by the petition process will only be qualified during the year in which it obtained signatures. At the time the organization submits petitions, it must also file with the Board of Elections a form including the name of the organization and the names and addresses of its chairperson and secretary. To maintain recognition, the organization must field a candidate for Governor or President who wins at least five percent of the total vote cast in the state for those offices.[3][5][6]

If the organization intends to nominate candidates by primary election, completed petitions must submitted to the appropriate local boards of canvassers by June 1 of the election year. If the organization intends to nominate candidates by another method, petitions must be submitted by August 1 of the election year.[3][5][7]

An independent candidate for Governor or President may establish a political party if he or she wins five percent of the total vote cast in the state for those offices and indicated at the time he or she filed for office to the Secretary of State that he or she intended to establish a political party (the candidate must provide the Secretary of State with the name of the prospective party and the names and addresses of the organization's chairperson and secretary).[8]

Selecting candidates

Recognized political parties nominate their candidates for office by primary election. Parties qualifying by the petition process may opt to nominate candidates by another method (e.g., convention) in the first year that they qualify for recognized status.[3][9]

Convention requirements

Party conventions are generally held for the purpose of adopting party platforms and conducting any other necessary party business. Each political party must hold a convention no later than October 14 of every even-numbered year. The party's nominees for the congressional delegation, the state executive offices, and state legislative offices must be delegates to the state convention. In presidential election years, conventions will also select the party's nominees for presidential electors.[10]

Maintaining party status

In order to maintain qualified status, a party must field a candidate for Governor or President who polls at least five percent of the total vote cast in the state for those offices. If a party fails to do so, it will cease to be recognized as a political party.[3]

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the Declaration of Candidacy form.
Quick facts about Lieutenant Governors
  • 45 states have Lt. governors, 43 of them fill the office by election
  • 21 states elect Lt. governors on a single ticket with the governor at both the primary and general elections
  • 5 states elect Lt. governors separately from Governors at the primary and then put the top two vote-getters together on the general election ballot
  • 17 states, including Rhode Island, elect Lt. governors separately from the Governor

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Rhode Island General Laws, Title 17, Chapter 14

In Rhode Island, all candidates follow the same filing procedure, regardless of party affiliation. First, a candidate must file a Declaration of Candidacy. A candidate for statewide or federal office must submit this form to the Secretary of State. A candidate for the state legislature must file the declaration with the local board of canvassers in the city or town where he or she is registered to vote. Declarations of Candidacy may be filed during the last consecutive Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday in June of the election year.[11][12]

Party candidates use the Declaration of Candidacy to declare party affiliation, as well. If a candidate belongs to a party but wishes to run under a different party label, he or she must disaffiliate from the original party 90 days prior to filing the Declaration of Candidacy. Party-affiliated candidates may choose to run as independent candidates. Likewise, unaffiliated candidates may file as party candidates. Once they do, they automatically become members of the party.[11][13]

In Rhode Island, political party officials may designate candidates to represent their parties in primaries and general elections. Such designations are called endorsements. A party's state committee is responsible for making endorsements for federal and statewide candidates, while senatorial and representative district committees make endorsements for state legislative candidates. A majority of the committee's members must sign an endorsement form in order to endorse a particular candidate. Endorsements by district committees must be made by 4:00 p.m. on the day after the last day of the filing period. Endorsements by the state committee must be made by 4:00 p.m. on the second day after the final day of the filing period.[11][14][15]

Regardless of endorsement status, a candidate for federal, statewide, or state legislative office must collect signatures on nomination papers, which are issued after the candidate submits his or her Declaration of Candidacy. Signature requirements are the same for party candidates as they are for unaffiliated candidates. Nomination papers become available within two business days of the final date for filing endorsements. Signature requirements are summarized in the table below.[11][16][17]

Nomination paper signature requirements
Office Signatures required
Governor, United States Senator 1,000
United States Representative, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Treasurer, Secretary of State 500
State Senator 100
State Representative 50

Each sheet of a nomination paper may only include signatures from voters residing in the same city or town. Papers are due to the appropriate local board of canvassers by 4:00 p.m. on the 60th day preceding the primary.[11][18]

Write-in candidates

Write-in candidates do not need to file special paperwork in order to have their votes tabulated. However, write-in candidates engaged in campaign activities may be required to comply with the state's campaign finance laws.[19][20]

Petition requirements

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process to gain access to the ballot. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators in Rhode Island.

Party formation petitions

Any qualified registered voter may sign a party formation petition. Petition forms are provided by the Board of Elections.[21]

Nomination papers

Each individual signing a nomination paper must sign in person with his or her name and residential address. A registered voter can sign any number of nomination papers for any office, provided that the voter is eligible to vote for the office at the general election. A voter does not have to a member of the political party listed on the nomination paper (if any), and signing a nomination paper does not establish party membership. Each sheet of a nomination paper must include signatures from voters residing within the same city or town.[22][23][24]

Nomination papers are provided by elections officials. State legislative candidates may have nomination papers duplicated at their expense, but duplications must be time stamped by the elections official who issued the original nomination papers.[25]

Circulator requirements

Circulators of nomination papers must sign an affidavit indicating that the individual witnessed each signature made to the papers. The relevant statutes do not specify any additional circulator requirements (such as residency or pay status).[26]

Campaign finance

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Rhode Island General Laws, Title 17, Chapter 25

All candidates for public office are required by law to file periodic reports of campaign contributions and expenditures. A candidate is defined as any individual who undertakes any action necessary to qualify for nomination or election to public office, or who receives contributions or makes expenditures for campaign purposes, or who authorizes anyone else to receive contributions or make expenditures for campaign purposes on his or her behalf.[27][28]

Organizational requirements

A candidate must file a Notice of Organization with the Board of Elections upon filing a Declaration of Candidacy or before receiving a contribution or making an expenditure, whichever comes first. On the Notice of Organization, the candidate must include his or her name, residential and mailing addresses, contact information, office sought, party affiliation (if any), as well as the name, contact information, and signature of an appointed treasurer. The candidate must also identify a depository into which all campaign receipts will be deposited and from which all campaign expenditures will be made. Both the treasurer and the candidate must sign the notice in the presence of a notary public. A candidate may serve as his or her own treasurer. The candidate ultimately bears full responsibility for the activities of his or her campaign and the campaign's treasurer and/or deputy treasurers.[27][29]

A candidate is also required to file a Financial Disclosure Statement with the Rhode Island Ethics Commission within 30 days of filing his or her Declaration of Candidacy.[27][30]

The treasurer is responsible for maintaining and preserving all records and supporting documents for a period of four years.[27][31]

If the candidate will not accept contributions in excess of $100 in the aggregate from a single source within the calendar year (including a candidate's own funds) nor make aggregate expenditures greater than $1,000 within the calendar year, he or she may file an Affidavit for Annual Filing Exemption. By filing this form, the candidate is exempted from filing scheduled periodic and quarterly reports.[27][32]

Reporting requirements

Candidates for "general office" (Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, and Treasurer must file campaign finance reports electronically using the Campaign Finance Electronic Reporting and Tracking System (ERTS). Other candidates (including state legislative candidates) who raise or spend more than $10,000 annually, or whose report shows a campaign fund balance of $25,000 or greater are likewise required to file reports electronically. Other candidates who do not need these thresholds may file electronically or by paper.[27][33]

Generally speaking, a campaign finance report consists of the following:[27][34]

1.) Summary of Campaign Activity

Includes the campaign account's cash balance as of the beginning of the reporting period, total contributions and receipts received, total expenditures and disbursements made during the period, and ending cash balance for the reporting period.

2.) Schedule of Contributions Received

Includes individual and aggregate contributions and receipts for the reporting period. For all contributions from any individual exceeding $100 within a calendar year, the name, address and place of employment of the contributor must be provided, as well as the date and amount of the contribution. Contributions that do not meet this threshold may be reported as aggregate totals, though the treasurer must keep records including the itemized information.

3.) Schedule of Expenditures

Includes individual and aggregate expenditures and disbursements for the reporting period. For all expenditures or disbursements made to any person or vendor in excess of $100 within a calendar year, the name and address of the recipient must be included, as well as the amount, date and purpose of the expenditure or disbursement. Expenditures and disbursements that do not meet this threshold may be reported as aggregate totals, though the treasurer must maintain itemized records.

Reporting schedules vary according to the candidate's participation level in the election year. Examples from 2014 are provided in the tables below.[27][32]

2014 reporting schedule for candidates not participating in a primary or election*
Report type Reporting period Due date
1st on-going quarterly report January 1 - March 31 April 30, 2014
2nd on-going quarterly report April 1 - June 30 July 31, 2014
3rd on-going quarterly report July 1 - September 30 October 31 2014
4th on-going quarterly report October 1 - December 31 February 2, 2015
*This schedule only applies to candidates with on-going campaigns who are not participating in the 2014 elections.
2014 reporting schedule for candidates participating only in the general election*
Report type Reporting period Due date
1st on-going quarterly January 1 - March 31 April 30, 2014
2nd on-going quarterly April 1 - June 30 July 31, 2014
28 days before the election** July 1 - October 6 October 7, 2014
7 days before the election October 7 - October 27 October 28, 2014
28 days after the election October 28 - December 1 December 2, 2014
4th on-going quarterly December 2 - December 3 February 2, 2015
*This schedule only applies to candidates with on-going campaigns who are participating in the general election, but not the primary election.
**For individuals filing their Declarations of Candidacy during the declaration period and who do not have an on-going campaign, the first reporting period begins with with the date of declaration and ends on October 6.
2014 reporting schedule for candidates participating in the primary, but not nominated for the general election*
Report type Reporting period Due date
1st on-going quarterly report January 1 - March 31 April 30, 2014
2nd on-going quarterly report April 1 - June 30 July 31, 2014
28 days before the primary** July 1 - August 11 August 12, 2014
7 days before the primary August 12 - September 1 September 2, 2014
28 days after the primary September 2 - October 6 October 7, 2014
4th on-going quarterly report October 7 - December 31 February 2, 2015
*This schedule only applies to candidates with on-going campaigns who participate in the primary election but do not advance to the general election.
**For candidates who file during the declaration period and do not have on-going campaigns, the first reporting period begins with the date of declaration and ends on August 11, with the report due August 12.
2014 reporting schedule for candidates participating in the primary and general elections*
Report type Reporting period Due date
1st on-going quarterly report January 1 - March 31 April 30, 2014
2nd on-going quarterly report April 1 - June 30 July 31, 2014
28 days before the primary** July 1 - August 11 August 12, 2014
7 days before the primary August 12 - September 1 September 2, 2014
28 days before the election September 2 - October 6 October 7, 2014
7 days before the election October 7 - October 27 October 28, 2014
28 days after the election October 28 - December 1 December 2, 2014
4th on-going quarterly report December 2 - December 31 February 2, 2015
*This schedule only applies to candidates with on-going campaigns who participate in both the primary and general elections.
**For candidates who file during the declaration period and do not have on-going campaigns, the first reporting period begins with the date of declaration and ends on August 11, with the report due August 12.

Reports must be filed until all campaign funds have been expended and the campaign has filed an Affidavit of Dissolving Campaign Account.[27][32]

Contribution limits

No individual can contribute more than $1,000 to any single candidate or officeholder within a calendar year. No individual can contribute more than $10,000 in aggregate to any number of candidates or officeholders within a calendar year.[27][35]

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

  • Rhode Island Board of Elections
Why: To file campaign finance reports
50 Branch Ave.
Providence, RI 02904-2737
Phone: (401) 222-2345
Fax: (401) 222-3135
Website: http://www.elections.state.ri.us/
Email: elections@elections.ri.gov
  • Rhode Island Secretary of State: Elections and Voting Division
Why: To file declarations of candidacy (for federal and statewide offices)
148 West River Street
Providence, RI 02904-2615
Phone: (401) 222-2340
Website: http://sos.ri.gov/elections/

Local election agencies

See also: Cities in Rhode Island

A candidate must file a number of documents with the local board of canvassers in the city or town where he or she is registered to vote. Individual municipality contact information can be found below.

Rhode Island municipality contact information
Municipality Email Phone Secondary phone Fax Website Physical address Mailing address
Barrington ljames@barrington.ri.gov (401) 247-1900 (401) 247-3765 Link Town Hall 283 County Rd Barrington, RI 02806
Bristol lpcirillo@bristolri.us (401) 253-7000 (401) 253-2647 Link Town Hall 10 Court Street Bristol, RI 02809
Burrillville lphaneuf@burrillville.org (401) 568-4300 x112 (401) 568-0490 Link Town Hall 105 Harrisville Main Street Harrisville, RI 02830
Central Falls boc@centralfallsri.us (401) 727-7450 (401) 724-2031 Link City Hall 580 Broad Street Central Falls, RI 02863
Charlestown arweinreich@charlestownri.org (401) 364-1200 (401) 364-1238 Link Town Hall 4540 South County Trail Charlestown, RI 02813
Coventry landerson@coventryri.org (401) 822-9150 (401) 822-9132 Link Town Hall 1670 Flat River Road Coventry, RI 02816
Cranston canvassing@cranstonri.org (401) 780-3126 (401) 780-3125 Link City Hall 869 Park Avenue Cranston, RI 02910
Cumberland sgiovanelli@cumberlandri.org (401) 728-2400 ext. 136 (401) 724-1103 Link Town Hall 45 Broad Street Cumberland, RI 02864
East Greenwich evespia@eastgreenwichri.com (401) 886-8603 (401) 886-8625 Link Town Hall PO Box 111 East Greenwich, RI 02818
East Providence lshattuck-moore@cityofeastprov.com (401) 435-7502 (401) 435-1909 Link City Hall 145 Taunton Avenue East Providence, RI 02914
Exeter canvassers@town.exeter.ri.us (401) 294-2287 (401) 295-1248 Link Town Hall 675 Ten Rod Road Exeter, RI 02822
Foster clsholly@townoffoster.com (401) 392-9200 (401) 702-5010 Link Town Hall 181 Howard Hill Road Foster, RI 02825
Glocester Link] Townclerk@GlocesterRI.org (401) 568-6206 (401) 568-5850 Link Town Hall 1145 Putnam Pike Glocester, RI 02814 PO Box Glocester, RI 02814
Hopkinton Link] Townclerk@hopkintonri.org (401) 377-7777 (401) 377-7788 Link Town Hall One Townhouse Road Hopkinton, RI 02833
Jamestown kmontoya@jamestownri.net (401) 423-9804 (401) 423-7230 Link Town Hall 93 Narragansett Avenue Jamestown, RI 02835
Johnston larusso@johnston-ri.us (401) 553-8856 (401) 553-8862 Link Town Hall 1385 Hartford Avenue Johnston, RI 02919
Lincoln kallan@lincolnri.org (401) 333-1140 (401) 753-7107 Link Town Hall 100 Old River Road Lincoln, RI 02865
Little Compton cwordell@tlcri.com (401) 635-4400 (401) 635-2470 Link Town Hall P.O. Box 226 Little Compton, RI 02837
Middletown wmarshall@middletownri.com (401) 849-5540 (401) 845-0406 Link Town Hall 350 East Main Road Middletown, RI 02842
Narragansett airons@narragansettri.gov (401) 782-0625 (401) 783-9637 Link Town Hall 25 Fifth Avenue Narragansett, RI 02882
Newport roneill@cityofnewport.com (401) 845-5384 (401) 848-5750 Link City Hall 43 Broadway Newport, RI 02840
New Shoreham Link] Townclerk@new-shoreham.com (401) 466-3200 (401) 466-3219 Link Town Hall P.O. Box 220 New Shoreham, RI 02807
North Kingstown cbyers@northkingstown.org (401) 294-3331 (401) 294-2437 Link Town Hall 80 Boston Neck Road N. Kingstown, RI 02852
North Providence bocdirector@northprovidenceri.gov (401) 232-0900 (401) 719-1609 Link Town Hall 2000 Smith Street N. Providence, RI 02911
North Smithfield dtodd@nsmithfieldri.org (401) 767-2200 x326 (401) 356-4057 Link Municipal Annex 575 Smithfield Road North Smithfield, RI 02896
Pawtucket kmcgill@pawtucketri.com (401) 722-1637 x207 (401) 729-9499 Link City Hall 137 Roosevelt Avenue Pawtucket, RI 02861
Portsmouth mpencak@portsmouthri.com (401) 683-3157 (401) 683-2107 Link Town Hall 2200 East Main Road Portsmouth, RI 02871
Providence kplacencia@providenceri.com (401) 421-0495 (401) 421-9397 Link City Hall 25 Dorrance Street Providence, RI 02903
Richmond Link] Townclerk@richmondri.com (401) 539-9000 (401) 539-1089 Link Town Hall 5 Richmond Townhouse Rd Wyoming, RI 02898
Scituate chatfieldg@scituateri.org (401) 647-2822 (401) 647-7220 Link Town Hall P.O. Box 328 N. Scituate, RI 02857
Smithfield sboc@smithfieldri.com (401) 233-1001 (401) 232-7244 Link Town Hall 64 Farnum Pike Smithfield, RI 02917
South Kingstown dholberton@southkingstownri.com (401) 789-9331 x 1230 (401) 788-9792 Link Town Hall 180 High Street Wakefield, RI 02879
Tiverton boardofcanvassers@townoftivertonri.com (401) 625-6703 (401) 625-6705 Link Town Hall 343 Highland Road Tiverton, RI 02878
Warren jcoelho@townofwarren-ri.gov (401) 245-7340 (401) 245-7421 Link Town Hall 514 Main Street Warren, RI 02885
Warwick donna.j.mcdonald@warwickri.com (401) 738-2000 Ext. 2222 (401) 732-3439 Link City Hall 3275 Post Road Warwick, RI 02886
Westerly brayman@westerlyri.org (401) 348-2503 (401) 348-2571 Link Town Hall 45 Broad Street Westerly, RI 02891
West Greenwich efliese@wgtownri.org (401) 392-3800 Ex. 108 or Ext. 100 (401) 392-3805 Link Town Hall 280 Victory Highway West Greenwich, RI 02817
West Warwick jclarke@westwarwickri.org (401) 822-9200 (401) 822-9266 Link Town Hall 1170 Main Street West Warwick, RI 02893
Woonsocket ecorriveau@woonsocketri.org (401) 767-9221 (401) 767-9226 Link City Hall 169 Main Street Woonsocket, RI 02895

Term limits

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits and States with gubernatorial term limits and Rhode Island state executive official elections, 2014

State executive term limits in Rhode Island are established in Article IV of the state constitution and are as follows:

The state executives who are term-limited in 2014 are:

Name Party Office
Elizabeth Roberts Electiondot.png Democratic Lieutenant Governor
Ralph Mollis Electiondot.png Democratic Secretary of State

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

There are no term limits for Rhode Island state legislators.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Rhode Island and List of United States Senators from Rhode Island

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Rhode Island:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Rhode Island
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 2 2 4
     Republican Party 0 0 0
TOTALS as of August 2014 2 2 4


State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Rhode Island:

Senate

Party As of August 2014
     Democratic Party 32
     Republican Party 5
     Independent 1
Total 38

House

Party As of August 2014
     Democratic Party 69
     Republican Party 6
Total 75

See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

Other information

References

  1. Rhode Island Secretary of State, "Declaration of Candidacy," accessed December 4, 2013
  2. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-1-2," accessed March 25, 2014
  4. Rhode Island Board of Elections, "2010 General Election Results," accessed March 25, 2014
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Rhode Island Board of Elections, "2012 General Election Results," accessed March 25, 2014
  6. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-12-16," accessed March 25, 2014
  7. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-12-16," accessed March 25, 2014
  8. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-12-15," accessed March 25, 2014
  9. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-15-6," accessed March 25, 2014
  10. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-12-13," accessed March 25, 2014
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 Rhode Island Secretary of State, "Rhode Island: How to Run for Office 2014," accessed March 26, 2014
  12. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-1," accessed March 26, 2014
  13. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-1.1," accessed March 26, 2014
  14. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-12-4," accessed March 26, 2014
  15. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-12-11," accessed March 26, 2014
  16. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-7," accessed March 26, 2014
  17. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-4," accessed March 26, 2014
  18. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-11," accessed March 26, 2014
  19. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-19-31," accessed March 26, 2014
  20. Rhode Island Board of Elections, "Procedures for Tabulating and Reporting Write-In Votes," accessed March 26, 2014
  21. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-1-2," accessed March 25, 2014
  22. Rhode Island Secretary of State, "How to Run for Office 2014," accessed March 26, 2014
  23. Rhode Island General Laws, "Section 17-14-8," accessed March 26, 2014
  24. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-9," accessed March 26, 2014
  25. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-4," accessed March 26, 2014
  26. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-14-10," accessed March 26, 2014
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 27.4 27.5 27.6 27.7 27.8 27.9 Rhode Island Board of Elections, "Campaign Finance Manual 2014," accessed March 26, 2014
  28. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-25-3," accessed March 26, 2014
  29. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-25-8," accessed March 26, 2014
  30. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 36, Section 36-14-16," accessed March 26, 2014
  31. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-25-11.1," accessed March 26, 2014
  32. 32.0 32.1 32.2 Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-25-11," accessed March 26, 2014
  33. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-25-7.6," accessed March 26, 2014
  34. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-25-7," accessed March 26, 2014
  35. Rhode Island General Laws, "Title 17, Section 17-25-10.1," accessed March 26, 2014