Difference between revisions of "Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Vermont"

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{{Candidate access VNT}}{{tnr}}This page contains extensive information about '''ballot access requirements''' for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of [[Vermont]]. Offices included are:
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{{Candidate access VNT}}{{tnr}}This page contains extensive '''information about [[Ballot access|ballot access]] requirements''' for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of [[Vermont]]. Offices included are:
 
*[[United States Congress]]
 
*[[United States Congress]]
 
*[[Vermont state executive offices|State executive offices]] (e.g., Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurer, etc.)  
 
*[[Vermont state executive offices|State executive offices]] (e.g., Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurer, etc.)  

Revision as of 09:19, 24 January 2014

Ballot access policy in the United States
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Ballot access for major and minor party candidates
List of political parties in the United States
Ballot access information by state
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This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Vermont. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Vermont. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: Vermont elections, 2014

Vermont will have a state primary for statewide and state legislative offices on August 26, 2014 and a general election for state and federal offices on November 4, 2014. Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

The 2014 filing deadline for candidates seeking a political party's nomination by running in the state primary, for minor party candidates, and for independent candidates is June 12, 2014.[1] The deadline to qualify as a political party in time for the 2014 elections is May 12, 2014.[2]

Deadline Event
May 12, 2014 Deadline for the creation of a new political party
June 12, 2014 Filing deadline for major party, minor party, and independent candidates
August 26, 2014 State Primary Date
November 4, 2014 General election

Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of October 2013, there are seven recognized political parties in Vermont.[3] Independent candidates seeking nomination by petition for the general election may select a political designation apart from those recognized by the state (the designation may be up to three words and may not be the name of an organized major or minor political party in Vermont).[4]

There is a difference between the official recognition of a political party and a party designation in some states. These political designations are not officially recognized political parties. Designations are often formed around a particular cause or ideology.[5]

Candidates can sometimes appear on the ballot under a political designation while other times appearing under a political party. This may involve a particular state's law regarding by-law requirements, petitions, or other factors. In some cases, official parties may receive state funding or the right to a state-sanctioned primary. Other states, for example, may require a candidate to run as a member of a political group before it is recognized as a full party, requiring that candidate to earn a certain percentage of the votes cast in that election for the identified group to be considered a party.

Party Website link By-laws/Platform link
Republican Party Official party website Party platform
Americans Elect Party National party website
Democratic Party Official party website Party platform
Progressive Party Official party website Party by-laws
Working Families Party Official party website Party platform
Libertarian Party Official party website Party platform
Liberty Union Party Official party website Party platform

Process to become a candidate

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Title 17-49 of the Vermont Election Law

Major party candidates

A candidate seeking the nomination of a major political party in the primary must file a nominating petition and a Consent of Candidate form with the appropriate filing officer in order to authorize the printing of his or her name on the primary ballot.[6][7]

A candidate must file the petition and consent form with the appropriate filing authority no later than 5:00 p.m. on the second Thursday after the first Monday in June preceding the primary election. A candidate may only run for one party in the primary election, and only major party candidates may run in a primary.[8][9]

Petition signature requirements are detailed in the table below.[10]

Statutory signature requirements for major party candidates
Office Required signatures
Statewide and federal office 500
State Senator 100
State Representative 50

Minor party candidates

A candidate seeking the nomination of a minor political party in the general election is nominated by party committee. The candidate must file a Consent of Candidate form and Nomination by Party Committee form with the Vermont Secretary of State. The party committee must also complete the Nomination by Party Committee form.[11]

Both the Consent of Candidate form and the Nomination by Party Committee form must be filed no later than 5:00 p.m. on the second Thursday after the first Monday in June preceding the primary election.[11][12]

Independent candidates

An independent candidates in the general election must file a Statement of Nomination form and Consent of Candidate form with the Vermont Secretary of State in order to authorize the printing of his or her name on the general election ballot.[13]

Petition signature requirements are detailed in the table below.[14]

Statutory signature requirements for independent candidates
Office Required signatures
Statewide and federal office 500
State Senator 100
State Representative 50

Write-in candidates

A write-in candidate is not required to submit any forms with any filing authority. The ballot will allow as many blank lines for write-in candidates as there are persons to be elected.[15]


Election-related agencies

Figure 1: This is the Consent of Candidate/Petition of Nomination Form for major party candidates.
See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office will require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

  • Vermont Secretary of State-Elections Divison
Why: To obtain and file nominating petitions; To obtain and file campaign finance forms
26 Terrace Street
Montpelier, VT 05609-1101
In-State: 1.800.439.8683
Outside VT: 802.828.2464
FAX: 802.828.5171
website: http://vermont-elections.org/soshome.htm

Term limits

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits and States with gubernatorial term limits

The following state executive officials serve two-year terms, with no provision specifying the number of terms allowed.

See also: Vermont state executive official elections, 2014

There are no state executives who are term-limited in 2014.

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

There are no term limits placed on Vermont state legislators.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Vermont and List of United States Senators from Vermont

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Vermont:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Vermont
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 1 1 2
     Republican Party 0 0 0
     Independents 1 0 1
TOTALS as of April 2015 1 1 2

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Vermont:

State Senate

Party As of April 2015
     Democratic Party 20
     Republican Party 9
     Vermont Progressive Party 1
Total 30

State house

Party As of April 2015
     Democratic Party 85
     Republican Party 53
     Vermont Progressive Party 6
     Independent 6
Total 150


See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

Other information

References