C. W. Bill Young

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C.W. Bill Young
CW Bill Young.jpg
U.S. House, Florida, District 13
Former Representative
In office
January 3, 1971-October 18, 2013
PartyRepublican
PredecessorVern Buchanan (R)
Leadership
Florida State Senate, Minority Leader
1966-1970
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First elected1970
Campaign $$4,947,250
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Florida State Senate
1961-1970
Military service
Service/branchArmy National Guard
Years of service1948-1957
Personal
BirthdayDecember 16, 1930
Place of birthHarmarville, Pennsylvania
ProfessionInsurance Executive
Net worth$415,501.50
ReligionMethodist
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
C.W. Bill Young campaign logo
Charles William "Bill" Young (b. December 16, 1930 - October 18, 2013, in Harmarville, Pennsylvania) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Young was elected by voters from Florida's 13th Congressional District. Young died on October 18, 2013, following complications resulting from a chronic injury.[1] At the time of his death, Young was the longest serving House Republican. A special election will be held to fill his vacant seat.[2]

On October 17, 2013, Young's family released a statement announcing that he was "gravely ill." [3] "U.S. Rep. C. W. Bill Young's condition turned for the worse over night and he is gravely ill," the family said. "His doctors say his prognosis is guarded."[3]

Young had announced on October 9, 2013, that when his term ended in 2014 he would retire.[4] He cited several factors why he chose not to run for re-election, including his health and his desire to spend more time with his family.[4]

Due to redistricting, Young ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House to represent Florida's 13th District.[5][6][7] Young was first elected to the U.S. House from District 8 in 1970.[8]

He previously served in the Florida State Senate from 1961 to 1970.[8]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Young is a more moderate right of center Republican Party vote. As a result, he may break with the Republican Party line more than his fellow members.

Biography

Young was born near Harmarville, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Pittsburgh, and moved to the St. Petersburg area at the age of 15. He served in the Army National Guard from 1948 to 1957. [9]

Young was the longest-serving Republican member of Congress at the time of his death. He was the senior member of the Florida congressional delegation and is the senior Republican in the entire Congress, House and Senate. He served over 50 years in public office (10 in the Florida State Senate and 41 in the United States Congress) and worked with eight Presidents of the United States.[9]

Career

Young also worked as an insurance executive.

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2013-2014

Young served on the following committees:[10]

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Defense Chairman
    • Subcommittee on Legislative Branch
    • Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs

2011-2012

Issues

Legislative actions

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png
The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1 percent) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[12] For more information pertaining to Young's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[13]

National security

DHS Appropriations

Voted "Yes" Young voted in favor of HR 2217 - the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 and was largely along party lines.[14]

Keystone Pipeline Amendment

Neutral/Abstain Young did not vote on House Amendment 69, which would have amended HR 3 to "require that the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, in consultation with the Department of Homeland Security, conduct a study of the vulnerabilities of the Keystone XL pipeline to a terrorist attack and certify that necessary protections have been put in place." The amendment failed on May 22, 2013, with a vote of 176 - 239 and was largely along party lines.[14]

CISPA (2013)

Voted "Yes" Young voted in favor of HR 624 - the CISPA (2013). The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill would allow federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities.[15] The bill was largely supported by Republicans, but divided the Democratic Party.[14]

NDAA

Voted "Yes" Young voted in favor of HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[14]

Economy

Immigration

Morton Memos Prohibition

Voted "Yes" Young voted in favor of House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain illegal aliens residing in the United States. The vote largely followed party lines.[14]

Healthcare

Health Care Reform Rules

Neutral/Abstain Young did not vote on House Amendment 450 - Requires Congressional Approval for Any Rules Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment was adopted by the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 227-185. The amendment requires all changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act be approved by Congress before taking effect. The vote was largely along party lines.[14]

Keep the IRS Off Your Health Care Act

Neutral/Abstain Young did not voted on HR 2009 - Keep the IRS Off Your Health Care Act of 2013. The bill passed through the House on August 2, 2013, with a vote of 232-185. The bill would prevent the IRS and Treasury Secretary from enforcing the powers provided to them in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The vote largely followed party lines.[14]

Social issues

Amash amendment

Voted "No" Young voted against House Amendment 413 - Prohibits the National Security Agency from Collecting Records Under the Patriot Act. The amendment failed on July 4, 2013, by a vote of 205-217. The amendment would have prohibited the collection of records by the National Security Agency under the Patriot Act. Both parties were split on the vote.[14]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Young voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was 1 of 85 Republicans that voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[16]

Campaign themes

2012

Young's campaign website listed the following issues:[17]

  • Protecting our Nation and Military
Excerpt: "Congressman Young has worked relentlessly throughout his career to support the troops and ensure our nation remains unharmed. Having served on the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee for 32 years, Congressman Young believes our men and women in uniform could never be paid enough for the sacrifices they and their families make daily."
  • Working to Protect Access to Medicare
Excerpt: "Congressman Young has consistently protected the Medicare program, and has fought hard as a senior member of the House Appropriations Committee to ensure that the many seniors who live in his district and around the county continue to receive the health care services they depend on. The Congressman believes the best way to responsibly protect Medicare is to work in a bipartisan manner with his colleagues on both sides of the aisle, as he has done for more than four decades he has represented Pinellas County."
  • Supporting Job Creators
Excerpt: "President Obama said that if we passed his trillion dollar spending stimulus bill, unemployment would stay under 8 percent. Unfortunately, the unemployment rate remained above 8 percent for 43 straight months and is now no better than when the President took office."
  • Social Security
Excerpt: "Congressman Young understands how vital Social Security benefits are to the people of Pinellas County. He has continually opposed efforts to weaken the safety net, such as replacing the program with private Social Security savings accounts, which jeopardize the benefits that countless retirees have come to rely on since the Social Security Act was first signed into law by President Roosevelt in 1935."
  • Assisting Veterans
Excerpt: "Congressman Young has always supported our brave veterans who served in the United States armed forces. These courageous men and women should be respected for the sacrifices they made to preserve the freedoms we enjoy. Taking care of the veterans who protected our great nation is one of Congressman Young’s primary concerns, one he is grateful to carry out."

Elections

2014

See also: Florida's 13th Congressional District elections, 2014

Young announced on October 9, 2013, that when his term ended in 2014 he would retire.[4] He cited several factors why he is not running for re-election, including his health and his desire to spend more time with his family.[4] However, Young became ill in October and passed away on October 18, 2013, following complications from a chronic injury.[18]

2012

See also: Florida's 13th Congressional District elections, 2012

Due to redistricting, Young was running in the 2012 election for the U.S. House, representing Florida's 13th District. Young was seeking re-election on the Republican ticket. Young won the nomination in the Republican primary on August 14, 2012. Jessica Ehrlich ran as a Democrat. The signature filing deadline was June 8, 2012, with the primary taking place on August 14, 2012. He was re-elected on November 6, 2012.[19]

U.S. House, Florida District 13 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngC.W. Bill Young Incumbent 57.6% 189,605
     Democratic Jessica Ehrlich 42.4% 139,742
Total Votes 329,347
Source: Florida Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"
U.S. House, Florida District 13 Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngC.W. Bill Young Incumbent 69.1% 39,381
Darren Ayres 18.5% 10,544
Madeline Vance 12.4% 7,049
Total Votes 56,974

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Young is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Young raised a total of $4,947,250 during that time period. This information was last updated on April 4, 2013.[34]

C. W. Bill Young's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 U.S. House (Florida, District 13) Won $1,040,707
2010 U.S. House (Florida, District 10) Won $697,978
2008 U.S. House (Florida, District 10) Won $943,430
2006 U.S. House (Florida, District 10) Won $635,223
2004 U.S. House (Florida, District 10) Won $556,179
2002 U.S. House (Florida, District 10) Won $574,840
2000 U.S. House (Florida, District 10) Won $498,893
Grand Total Raised $4,947,250

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below were Young's reports.[35]

C.W. Bill Young (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[36]April 14, 2013$196,941.43$58,151.07$(46,463.07)$208,629.43
July Quarterly[37]July 14, 2013$200,629.43$86,208.90$(52,022.67)$242,815.66
October Quarterly[38]October 13, 2013$242,815.66$26,602.85$(47,310.05)$242,108.46
Running totals
$170,962.82$(145,795.79)

2012

Breakdown of the source of Young's campaign funds before the 2012 election.

Young won re-election to the U.S. House in 2012. During that election cycle, Young's campaign committee raised a total of $1,040,707 and spent $1,047,105.[39] This is less than the average $1.5 million spent by House winners in 2012.[40]

Cost per vote

Young spent $5.52 per vote received in 2012.

2010

Breakdown of the source of Young's campaign funds before the 2010 election.

Young won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that re-election cycle, Young's campaign committee raised a total of $697,978 and spent $965,475.[41]

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Young was a "rank-and-file Republican," as of June 12, 2013.[42]

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she voted most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[43]

Young most often votes with:

Young least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Young missed 1,895 of 24,634 roll call votes from Jan 1971 to Mar 2013. This amounts to 7.7%, which is worse than the median of 2.2% among current congressional representatives as of March 2013.[44]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Young paid his congressional staff a total of $878,518 in 2011. He ranked 98th on the list of the lowest paid Republican representative staff salaries and ranked 119th overall of the lowest paid representative staff salaries in 2011. Overall, Florida ranked 36th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[45]

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Young's net worth as of 2012 was estimated between $266,003 and $565,000. That averages to $415,501.50, which is lower than the average net worth of Republican representatives in 2012 of $6,956,438.47. Young ranked as the 209th most wealthy representative in 2012.[46]

C.W. Bill Young Yearly Net Worth
YearAvg. Net Worth% Difference from previous year
2012$415,501.50259.74%
2011$115,501-0%
2010$115,501.50N/A

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year.

2012

Young ranked 215th in the conservative rankings in 2012.[47]

2011

Young ranked 193rd in the conservative rankings.[48]

Voting with party

2013

C.W. Bill Young voted with the Republican Party 91.8% of the time, which ranked 207th among the 233 House Republican members as of June 2013.[49]

Personal

Young and his wife Beverly had three adult sons, Rob, Billy, and Patrick.[9] Young previously was married to the former Marian Ford, and had three children from that marriage.[50]

Illness

On October 17, 2013, Young's family released a statement announcing that he was "gravely ill." [3] "U.S. Rep. C. W. Bill Young's condition turned for the worse over night and he is gravely ill," the family said. "His doctors say his prognosis is guarded."[3]

Young died on October 18, 2013, following complications resulting from a chronic injury.[51] At the time of his death, Young was the longest serving House Republican.

Renaming medical center

Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio introduced legislation on October 22, 2013, seeking to honor Young by renaming the Bay Pines VA Medical Center in his honor, renaming the facility the C.W. Bill Young Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.[52]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Bill + Young + Florida + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Bill Young News Feed

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See also

External links


References

  1. CNN.com, "Rep. Bill Young, longest-serving GOP member in House, dies at age 82", accessed October 18, 2013
  2. Politico, "Bill Young, longest-serving House Republican, dies", accessed October 18, 2013
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Washington Post, "Rep. Bill Young is ‘gravely ill’," accessed October 17, 2013
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Tampa Bay Times, "U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young to retire, won't seek re-election in 2014," accessed October 9, 2013
  5. AP Results "U.S. House Results" Accessed August 14, 2012
  6. TampaBay.com: St. Petersburg Times "Republican C.W. Bill Young may be vulnerable, but no Democrat is opposing him for re-election" Accessed December 2, 2011
  7. ABC News "2012 General Election Results"
  8. 8.0 8.1 Project VoteSmart "Bill Young" Accessed June 12, 2013
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 Congressman C.W. Bill Young "Full Biography" Accessed October 17, 2011
  10. CQ.com, "House Committee Rosters for the 113th Congress"
  11. Congressman C.W. Bill Young "Committees and Caucuses" Accessed October 17, 2011
  12. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  13. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 Project Votesmart, "C.W. Bill Young's Voting Record," accessed September 20, 2013
  15. The Library of Congress, "H.R.624 CISPA (2013) (Referred in Senate - RFS)," accessed August 27, 2013
  16. U.S. House "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff" Accessed January 4, 2013.
  17. Campaign website, Issues
  18. [ http://www.politico.com/story/2013/10/bill-young-dies-at-82-98546.html?hp=l2 Politico, "Bill Young, longest-serving House Republican, dies", accessed October 18, 2013]
  19. ABC News "2012 General Election Results"
  20. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  21. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  22. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  23. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  24. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  25. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  26. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  27. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1988," accessed March 28, 2013
  28. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1984," accessed March 28, 2013
  29. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 1978," accessed March 28, 2013
  30. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 1976," accessed March 28, 2013
  31. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  32. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 1972," accessed March 28, 2013
  33. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1970," accessed March 28, 2013
  34. Open Secrets "C.W. Bill Young" Accessed April 4, 2014
  35. Federal Election Commission "C.W. Bill Young 2014 Summary reports," Accessed July 22, 2013
  36. Federal Election Commission "April Quarterly" Accessed July 22, 2013
  37. Federal Election Commission "July Quarterly" Accessed July 22, 2013
  38. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed October 23, 2013
  39. Open Secrets "C.W. Bill Young 2012 Election Cycle," Accessed February 13, 2013
  40. Open Secrets, "Election 2012: The Big Picture Shows Record Cost of Winning a Seat in Congress," June 19, 2013
  41. Open Secrets "C.W. Bill Young 2010 Election Cycle," Accessed October 27, 2011
  42. Gov Track "Young" Accessed June 12, 2013
  43. OpenCongress, "Rep. C.W. Bill Young," Accessed July 31, 2013
  44. GovTrack, "C.W. Bill Young," Accessed March 29, 2013
  45. LegiStorm "Bill Young"
  46. OpenSecrets.org, "Young, (R-Fl), 2012"
  47. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," February 27, 2013
  48. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," February 23, 2012
  49. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  50. Tampa Bay Times, "Bill Young's first family emerges to tell their story," accessed January 6, 2014
  51. CNN.com, "Rep. Bill Young, longest-serving GOP member in House, dies at age 82", accessed October 18, 2013
  52. Miami Herald, "Florida lawmakers want to honor Rep. Young," accessed October 22, 2013
Political offices
Preceded by
Vern Buchanan (R)
U.S. House of Representatives - Florida, District 13
2013
Succeeded by
-
Preceded by
Andy Ireland
U.S. House of Representatives - Florida, District 10
1993–2013
Succeeded by
Daniel Webster (R)
Preceded by
'
U.S. House of Representatives - Florida, District 8
1983-1993
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
U.S. House of Representatives - Florida, District 6
1973-1983
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
U.S. House of Representatives - Florida, District 8
1971-1973
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Florida State Senate
1961-1970
Succeeded by
'