California's 48th Congressional District

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The 48th Congressional District of California is a congressional district in California.

California's 48th Congressional District is located in the southern portion of the state and includes most of the Orange County coast.[1]

California's 48th congressional district previously was based in Orange County in southern California. The district included the cities of Aliso Viejo, Dana Point, Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Woods, Lake Forest (formerly known as El Toro), Tustin, and parts of Newport Beach and San Juan Capistrano.[2]

The current representative of the 48th congressional district is Dana Rohrabacher (R).

Elections

2012

See also: California's 48th congressional district elections, 2012

The 48th congressional district of California held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent from the 46th district, Dana Rohrabacher won election in the district.[3]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDana Rohrabacher Incumbent 61% 177,144
     Democratic Ron Varasteh 39% 113,358
Total Votes 290,502
Source: California Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, John Campbell won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Beth Krom (D) and Mike Binkley (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Campbell incumbent 59.9% 145,481
     Democratic Beth Krom 36.4% 88,465
     Libertarian Mike Binkley 3.6% 8,773
Total Votes 242,719

2008
On November 4, 2008, John Campbell won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Steve Young (D) and Don Patterson (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Campbell incumbent 55.6% 171,658
     Democratic Steve Young 40.7% 125,537
     Libertarian Don Patterson 3.7% 11,507
Total Votes 308,702

2006
On November 7, 2006, John Campbell won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Steve Young (D) and Bruce Cohen (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Campbell 59.9% 120,130
     Democratic Steve Young 37.2% 74,647
     Libertarian Bruce Cohen 2.9% 5,750
Total Votes 200,527

2004
On November 2, 2004, Christopher Cox won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Graham (D) and Bruce Cohen (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngChristopher Cox incumbent 65% 189,004
     Democratic John Graham 32.2% 93,525
     Libertarian Bruce Cohen 2.9% 8,343
Total Votes 290,872

2002
On November 5, 2002, Christopher Cox won re-election to the United States House. He defeated John Graham (D) and Joe Michael Cobb (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngChristopher Cox incumbent 68.4% 122,884
     Democratic John Graham 28.4% 51,058
     Libertarian Joe Michael Cobb 3.1% 5,607
Total Votes 179,549

2000
On November 7, 2000, Darrell Issa won election to the United States House. He defeated Peter Kouvelis (D), Eddie Rose (Reform), Sharon Miles (Natural Law) and Joe Michael Cobb (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDarrell Issa 61.4% 160,627
     Democratic Peter Kouvelis 28.3% 74,073
     Reform Eddie Rose 4.3% 11,240
     Natural Law Sharon Miles 3.2% 8,269
     Libertarian Joe Michael Cobb 2.8% 7,269
Total Votes 261,478

1998
On November 3, 1998, Ron Packard won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Sharon Miles (Natural Law) and Daniel Muhe (L) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Packard incumbent 76.9% 138,948
     Natural Law Sharon Miles 12.9% 23,262
     Libertarian Daniel Muhe 10.2% 18,509
Total Votes 180,719

1996
On November 5, 1996, Ron Packard won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Dan Farrell (D), William Dreu (Reform) and Sharon Miles (Natural Law) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Packard incumbent 65.9% 145,814
     Democratic Dan Farrell 26.9% 59,558
     Reform William Dreu 3.6% 8,013
     Natural Law Sharon Miles 3.6% 8,006
Total Votes 221,391

1994
On November 8, 1994, Ron Packard won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Andrei Leschick (D) and Donna White (P&F) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Packard incumbent 73.4% 143,570
     Democratic Andrei Leschick 22.2% 43,523
     Peace and Freedom Donna White 4.4% 8,543
Total Votes 195,636

1992
On November 3, 1992, Ron Packard won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Michael Farber (D), Donna White (P&F) and Ted Lowe (L) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, California District 48 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Packard incumbent 61.1% 140,935
     Democratic Michael Farber 29.2% 67,415
     Peace and Freedom Donna White 5.8% 13,396
     Libertarian Ted Lowe 3.8% 8,749
Total Votes 230,495

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 48th congressional district of California after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in California

In 2011, the California State Legislature re-drew the Congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

External links

See also

References