California Assembly Bill 2101 (2010)

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California Assembly Bill 2101 (2010)
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Legislature:California State Legislature
Text:As Chaptered
Sponsor(s):Fong
Legislative History
Introduced:February 18, 2010
State house:May 6, 2010
Vote (lower house):Y74, N0
State senate:August 9, 2010
Vote (upper house):Y34, N0
Governor:Arnold Schwarzenegger
Signed:September 25, 2010
Legal Environment
State law:Laws governing the initiative
process in California
California Assembly Bill 2101 was a 2010 California law which prohibited any person convicted of an elections fraud offense from accepting employment as a paid voter registration deputy or petition circulator.[1]

Assembly member Paul Fong (D-28) was the sponsor of the bill.

Text of bill

The text of AB 2101 is as follows:

SECTION 1. Section 18112 is added to the Elections Code, to read:

18112. Upon conviction of a violation of any provision of this chapter, the court may order as a condition of probation that the convicted person be prohibited from receiving money or other valuable consideration for assisting another person to register to vote by receiving the completed affidavit of registration.

SEC. 2. Section 18604 is added to the Elections Code, to read:

18604. Upon conviction of a violation of any provision of this article, Article 2 (commencing with Section 18610), Article 3 (commencing with Section 18620), Article 5 (commencing with Section 18640), Article 6 (commencing with Section 18650), or Article 7 (commencing with Section 18660), the court may order as a condition of probation that the convicted person be prohibited from receiving money or other valuable consideration for gathering signatures on an initiative, referendum, or recall petition.[2]

Summary

Below is a summary of AB 2101:

This bill authorizes a court upon finding a person guilty of the aforementioned violations, to issue an order, as a condition of probation, that the person be prohibited from receiving money or other valuable consideration for 1) assisting another person to register to vote by receiving the completed affidavit or 2) for gathering signatures on an initiative, referendum or recall petition.[3][2]

Background

Below is a summary of the background behind AB 2101:

The individuals who are paid to collect signatures on initiative, referendum, recall petitions or voter registrations are commonly referred to as "bounty hunters."

To qualify an initiative to be placed on the statewide ballot, proponents must gather hundreds of thousands of signatures. The need to collect this large number of signatures within a limited timeframe has given rise to an industry of petition management firms that pay signature gatherers a bounty based on the number of signatures they collect.

Stories about voters being misled into signing initiative petitions that they do not support or having their party affiliations changed without their consent are all too common. In the last two election cycles, individuals registering voters in Southern California have been arrested and charged in schemes to change voters' partisan affiliations without the voters' consent. Additionally, the Orange County Register reported on complaints of a similar scheme in Southern California earlier this year.[3][2]

See also

External links

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Suggest a link

References

  1. California Assembly, Assembly Bill 2101, as chaptered
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Leginfo.gov Summary and Background of AB 2101, accessed December 20, 2013