Vote button trans.png
April's Project of the Month
It's spring time. It's primary election season!
Click here to find all the information you'll need to cast your ballot.




California Proposition 73, Limits on Campaign Donations (June 1988)

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 08:45, 12 November 2012 by Polycal (Talk | contribs)

Jump to: navigation, search
California Proposition 73 was on the June 7, 1988 statewide ballot in California as an initiated state statute, where it was approved.

Proposition 73:

  • Limited the amount that an individual could contribute annually to a candidate for public office to $1,000 from each person, $2,500 from each political committee, and $5,000 from a political party and each "broad based political committee".
  • Permitted stricter local limits.
  • Limited gifts and honoraria to elected officials to $1,000 from each single source per year.
  • Prohibited the transfer of funds between candidates or their controlled committees.
  • Prohibited sending newsletters or other mass mailings at public expense.
  • Prohibited public officials using and candidates accepting public funds for the purpose of seeking elective office.

Proposition 131 in 1990 tried, but failed, to amend Proposition 73.

Election results

Proposition 73
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 3,144,944 58.06%
No2,271,94141.94%

Text of measure

Title

The ballot title was:

Campaign Funding. Contribution Limits. Prohibition of Public Funding. Initiative Statute.

Summary

The official summary said:

"Limits annual political contributions to a candidate for public office to $1,000 from each person, $2,500 from each political committee, and $5,000 from a political party and each "broad based political committee," as defined. Permits stricter local limits. Limits gifts and honoraria to elected officials to $1,000 from each single source per year. Prohibits transfer of funds between candidates or their controlled committees. Prohibits sending newsletters or other mass mailings, as defined, at public expense. Prohibits public officials using and candidates accepting public funds for purpose of seeking elective office."

Fiscal impact

See also: Fiscal impact statement

The fiscal estimate provided by the California Legislative Analyst's Office said:

"The measure would result in net savings to the state and local governments. State administrative costs will be about $1.1 million a year, when the measure is fully operational, and would be financed from the state's General Fund. Most of this cost would be incurred by the Fair Political Practices Commission. These costs would be offset by annual savings of about $1.8 million resulting from the prohibition on the expenditure of public funds for newsletters and mass mailings.
Local government agencies also would experience unknown annual savings. These savings would result primarily from the prohibition on public expenditures for newsletters and mass mailings."

See also

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

External links


Flag of California.png

This article about a California ballot proposition is a stub. You can help people learn about California's ballot propositions by expanding it.