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California Statewide Sales Tax Increase (2010)

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Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
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A California Statewide Sales Tax Increase (08-0021) was intended for but will not be on the 2010 state ballot as initiated constitutional amendment.

The measure proposed a 1% sales and use tax to supplement current education funding. Additionally the bill required that 89 percent of new revenue be used for kindergarten through grade 12 and 11 percent be used for community colleges. Funds would be permitted for "staff development, teacher salaries, student services and programs like art, music, and vocational education." However, the measure prohibits the use of the funds for administrative costs. Annual audits would also be performed.[1]

The California Teachers Association filed the proposed measure in December 2008. They referred to it as the Public School Investment and Accountability Act.[2]

Roberta B. Johansen and Karen Getman filed the proposed initiative.

History

The ballot measure was said to have been the outcome of failed negotiations in late 2008 and early 2009. "Initiatives generally occur when the Legislature fails to solve the problem," said Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg. Budgetary problems in California has led to a $42 billion dollar deficit for 2009 causing shortfalls in many of California's programs, including education.[3]

Impact of sales tax increase

According to the Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance the measure is estimated to generate increased revenue of approximately $2.5 billion in 2009-10 and $5.1 billion annually thereafter.[1]

The California Teachers Association estimates new revenue between $5 billion and $6 billion per year.[3]

Signature requirements

Supporters of the ballot measure would have had to collect signatures from 694,354 registered voters by July 27, 2009 in order to qualify the measure for the ballot.[1]

External links

References