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Difference between revisions of "Campaign finance requirements for Nevada ballot measures"

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===Post-Election report-January 15th===
 
===Post-Election report-January 15th===
  
Report 4 is considered to be the last regular campaign finance report for ballot advocacy groups in Nevada during the election cycle.  This covers activity from October 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. This report is due on Janaury 1, 2010<ref>[http://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-294A.html#NRS294ASec283 "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law](Referenced Statute 294A.283 2(D) Nevada Revised Statutes)</ref>..
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Report 4 is considered to be the last regular campaign finance report for ballot advocacy groups in Nevada during the election cycle.  This covers activity from October 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. This report is due on January 1, 2010<ref>[http://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-294A.html#NRS294ASec283 "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law](Referenced Statute 294A.283 2(D) Nevada Revised Statutes)</ref>..
  
 
==Campaign advertising restrictions==
 
==Campaign advertising restrictions==

Latest revision as of 09:26, 8 January 2014

Campaign finance requirements for Nevada ballot measures are promulgated by the Nevada Secretary of State. The Secretary of State's Office is responsible for handling the administrative and reporting functions of campaign finance in the State of Nevada.

The Secretary of State maintains an online reporting database for all groups in support or opposition of a ballot measure in Nevada. If someone feels a person violated Nevada campaign finance law, the first step is to file a complaint with the Nevada Secretary of State. Once a complaint is filed, the allegations are forwarded to the Nevada Attorney General for further action involving both civil and criminal law violations[1].

General requirements

Ballot advocacy group

Nevada law defines a group in support or opposition of a ballot measure as a ballot advocacy group. This definition came when the Nevada Legislature passed new laws in 2007[2].

Registered agent clause

Nevada law requires ballot advocacy groups to have a registered agent that acts as the official representative for the campaign when dealing with business related to the Nevada Secretary of State[3].

Statement of Organization

A group in support or opposition of a ballot measure in the State of Nevada must file a Statement of Organization before conducting any campaign activity[4].

The $1,000 rule

Nevada law requires ballot advocacy groups to report contributions of $1,000 or more if the donations were made at one time on a one time basis. Also, the $1,000 rule is required if the donations were made on a series of donations during an election that totaled up to $1,000 and or the donations are made on a frequent basis[5].

Campaign finance requirements

Anonymous contributions

No campaign can accept any anonymous contribution of $100 or more. The campaign must make an effort to get the contact information of the donor in the 10 day period, if unsuccessful then the money must be returned to the Secretary of State within 10 days of receiving the contribution[6].

Contribution limits

There are no campaign contribution limits for groups in support or opposition of a ballot measure in Nevada[7].

Nevada law requires a person or group of persons organized in a formal or informal fashion including a business entities that plan to advocate the passage or defeat of a ballot measure must report if they paid people to circulate petitions.

The campaign finance reports must state the number of persons to which they paid compensation to gather signatures, out of all the people reported the person with least compensation and the most compensation, along with the total amount of compensation paid to all circulators[8].

Reporting funds

Nevada law requires a person or group of persons organized in a formal or informal fashion including a business entities that plan to advocate the passage or defeat of a ballot measure must file a campaign finance report with the Secretary of State.

This is required if a campaign has the expectation of reaching the $10,000 or more threshold of expenditures made or contributions received[9]

Reporting requirements and reports

Campaign finance reporting in Nevada is done on a quarterly basis during the campaign season.

Report 1-April 15th

This is considered to be the first campaign finance report for ballot advocacy groups in Nevada. This covers activity from January 1, 2010 to March 31, 2010. This report is due on April 15, 2010[10].

Report 2-August 15th

This is considered to be the second campaign finance report for ballot advocacy groups in Nevada. This covers activity from April 1, 2010 to July 31, 2010.This report is due on August 15, 2010[11]..

Pre-Election report-October 15th

Report 3 is considered to be the last campaign finance report for ballot advocacy groups in Nevada before the election. This covers activity from August 1, 2010 to September 30, 2010. This report is due on October 15, 2010[12].

Post-Election report-January 15th

Report 4 is considered to be the last regular campaign finance report for ballot advocacy groups in Nevada during the election cycle. This covers activity from October 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. This report is due on January 1, 2010[13]..

Campaign advertising restrictions

There are no disclaimer requirements or restrictions on campaign advertisements done in support or opposition of a ballot measure in Nevada[14].

Terminating a committee

Under Nevada law, a ballot advocacy group becomes inactive when the final vote count is certified or all challenges and or recounts have been completed. The group must file an inactivity/termination statement with the Secretary of State within 30 days of becoming inactive[15].

External links

References

  1. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Section 294A.410(1)(B))
  2. "Nevada Secretary of State" Ballot Advocacy Group Definition
  3. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.282 Nevada Revised Statutes)
  4. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced statute 294A.281(1) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  5. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced statute 294A.283(1) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  6. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.190 Nevada Revised Statutes)
  7. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.100 Nevada Revised Statutes)
  8. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.284 (1) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  9. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.283 (1) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  10. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.283 2(A) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  11. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.283 2(B) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  12. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.283 2(C) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  13. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.283 2(D) Nevada Revised Statutes)
  14. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.347 Nevada Revised Statutes)
  15. "Nevada Legislature" Nevada Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 294A.115 Nevada Administrative Code)