Campaign finance requirements for New Hampshire ballot measures

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Campaign finance requirements for New Hampshire ballot measures are promulgated by the New Hampshire Secretary of State. The Secretary of State is responsible for all reporting and administrative functions related to New Hampshire's campaign finance laws. The Secretary of State maintains an online disclosure database.

If anyone feels someone violated New Hampshire campaign finance law, the first step is to file a complaint with the New Hampshire Attorney General[1]. The Attorney General prosecutes and investigates all campaign finance complaints in New Hampshire.

General requirements

Political committee

Under New Hampshire law, any group in support or opposition of a referendum is considered to be a political committee[2].

Statement of Organization

Political Committees must file a Statement of Organization with the New Hampshire Secretary of State within fourteen days of forming a committee or within 24 hours of making an expenditure or receiving contributions of $500 or more whichever comes first[3].

Campaign finance requirements

Ballot Law Commission prohibition

Under New Hampshire law, no member of the New Hampshire Ballot Law Commission can make contributions to campaigns in support or opposition of a ballot measure[4].

Corporate/labor contributions

New Hampshire law allows corporations and labor unions to donate to political committees in support or opposition of a referendum[5]. Corporations and labor unions are prohibited from donating to candidates, candidate committees, and state party committees[5].

Filing reports

Any group in support or opposition of a ballot measure that has reciepts or expenditures of $500 or more must file all campaign finance reports[6].

New Hampshire RoboCall law

New Hampshire is one of a few states to regulate "robo calls." All campaigns must introduce in the first thirty seconds which committee they are from and who paid for the calls[7].

Reporting requirements and reports

New Hampshire is considered to be a frequent reporting state in which campaign finance reports are filed during various times of the year.

Six-Month Pre-Election

Under New Hampshire law, the first campaign finance reports are filed in June. The six month report covers all campaign finance activity from the date a ballot question was qualified up to June 21, 2010. The report is due on June 23, 2010[8].

Summary Report 1

New Hampshire has four summary reporting periods. The first one covers June 23 to August 23, 2010. The report is due on August 25, 2010[8].

Summary Report 2

The Second summary reporting period covers from August 23, 2010 to September 6, 2010. The report is due on September 8, 2010[8].

Summary Report 3

The third summary reporting period covers from August 6, 2010 to September 14, 2010. The report is due on September 22, 2010[8].

Summary Report 4

The fourth summary reporting period covers from September 14, to October 11, 2010. The report is due on October 13, 2010[8].

Pre-election

The pre-election report covers all campaign finance activity from October 11, 2010 to October 25, 2010. The report is due on October 27, 2010[8].

Post-Election report

The post-election report covers all campaign finance activity from the day of the general election till eight days after the election. The report for 2010 elections is due on November 10, 2010[8].

Campaign advertising restrictions

Under New Hampshire law, all political advertisements if it is print advertisement or a billboard must have the words "political advertising" at the bottom or top of the ad. Also, all advertisers must disclose its selling rates to the New Hampshire Secretary of State within 30 days after the deadline of qualifying a ballot measure[9].

Also any advertisement in New Hampshire needs to be signed at the beginning or the end of the ad with the name or address of the treasurer or chairman of the political committee along with the signature of the person[10]. The same goes to corporations or labor unions issuing ads in support or opposition of a ballot measure in which must be signed by the name or address of the chairman or treasurer of the corporation or union[11].

Terminating a committee

Under New Hampshire law, all political committee registrations terminate within ten days after the general or primary election[12].

External links

References

  1. New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Campaign Finance Law"(Referenced Statute, 664:18, New Hampshire Code)
  2. New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Campaign Finance Law"(Referenced Statute, 664-2, III New Hampshire Code)
  3. New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Campaign Finance Law"(Referenced Statute, 664-3, I New Hampshire Code)
  4. New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Election Law"(Referenced Section 665:3, New Hampshire Code)
  5. 5.0 5.1 New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Election Law"(Referenced Section 664:4 I-III, New Hampshire Code)
  6. New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Election Law"(Referenced Section 664:6 I, New Hampshire Code)
  7. New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Election Law"(Referenced Section 664:14, New Hampshire Code)
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 "New Hampshire Secretary of State" 2010 PAC Reporting Dates
  9. "New Hampshire General Court" New Hampshire Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 664:16 New Hampshire Code)
  10. "New Hampshire General Court" New Hampshire Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 664:14, I New Hampshire Code)
  11. "New Hampshire General Court" New Hampshire Campaign Finance Law(Referenced Statute 664:14, II New Hampshire Code)
  12. New Hampshire General Court "New Hampshire Campaign Finance Law" (Referenced Statute, 664:3, III)