City of Los Angeles Limits to Campaign Spending and Rights of Corporations, Measure C (May 2013)

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A City of Los Angeles Limits to Campaign Spending and Rights of Corporations, Measure C ballot question was on the May 21, 2013 ballot for voters in the City of Los Angeles in Los Angeles County, where it was overwhelmingly approved.

Measure C adopted a resolution that:

  • Imposes limits on political campaign spending
  • Declares that corporations should not have the constitutional rights of human beings
  • Instructs "Los Angeles elected officials and area legislative representatives to promote that policy through amendments to the United States Constitution".

Election results

Measure C
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 235,517 76.56%
No72,07023.43%
These results are from the Los Angeles City Clerk.

Editorial opinion

The editorial board of the Los Angeles Daily News endorsed Measure C, writing, "It's a chance for Angelenos to get behind one aspect of much-needed election reform by striking back against U.S. Supreme Court rulings that have removed limits on campaign spending by corporations, labor unions and shadowy interest groups."[1]

Ballot question

The question on the ballot:

Measure C: "Shall the voters adopt a resolution that there should be limits on political campaign spending and that corporations should not have the constitutional rights of human beings and instruct Los Angeles elected officials and area legislative representatives to promote that policy through amendments to the United States Constitution?"[2]

References

  1. Los Angeles Daily News, "L.A.'s Prop. C a step toward reforming elections: Editorial", April 10, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

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