City of San Rafael sales tax, Measure E (November 2013)

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A City of San Rafael sales tax, Measure E ballot question was on the November 5, 2013, election ballot for voters in the city of San Rafael in Marin County, which is in California.[1] It was approved.

Measure E renewed a 0.5% sales tax approved in Measure S by voters in 2005. Measure E also authorized a 0.25% tax increase or 25 cents per $100 purchase or $2.50 on a $1,000 purchase. The resulting total sales tax rate for city residents became 9.25%. The rate in many other cities such as San Anselmo, Corte Madera, and Larkspur became 9% as their respective tax measures were also approved.[2]

Election results

Measure D
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 7,760 65.30%
No4,12334.70%
These final, certified results are from the Marin County elections office.

Background

San Rafael voters approved a Measure S tax increase of 0.5% in 2005, which produced about $7 million per year to the city's general fund, about 12% of the annual budget. This tax is set to expire.[2]

Text of measure

The question on the ballot:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Shall the City of San Rafael extend the existing one-half percent local sales tax and increase

the rate by one-quarter percent to provide funding that cannot be taken by the State, and can be used to preserve essential city services for a period of 20 years, including: maintaining rapid emergency police/fire response times, maintaining adequate numbers of on-duty firefighters/paramedics/police, ensuring earthquake safe police/fire stations, maintaining community centers and repairing city streets?[1]

Support

YesonESanRafael.jpg

Supporters

  • Yes on E for a Safer San Rafael[2]

Arguments in favor

If Measure E did not pass, the City would likely have been forced to make cuts to important services including police, fire and other emergency services programs.[2]

See also

External links

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References