Colorado Campaign Contribution Limits, Amendment 15 (1994)

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The Colorado Campaign Contribution Amendment, also known as Amendment 15, was a initiated constitutional amendment in Colorado which was defeated on the ballot on November 8, 1994.

Election results

Colorado Amendment 15 (1994)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No588,07253.65%
Yes 508,029 46.35%

Election results via: Colorado Legislative Council

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

Shall there be an amendment to the Colorado Constitution to limit the amount of campaign contributions, including in-kind contributions, that may be accepted by candidate committees, political committees, and political parties; to require candidate committees to receive at least sixty percent of their contributions from natural persons; to prohibit a candidate committee from making a contribution to or accepting a contribution from another candidate committee; to prohibit a political party from accepting contributions that are intended to be passed through to a candidate committee; to limit those persons who may contribute to a candidate committee to natural persons, political parties, and political committees; to treat unexpended campaign contributions held by a candidate committee as contributions from other than natural persons in a subsequent election; to require notice and disclosure of independent expenditures in an election; to require reporting to the secretary of state by candidate committees, political committees, and political parties of contributions, expenditures, and obligations; to create the campaign and political finance commission with jurisdiction over these provisions; to provide civil and criminal sanctions for violations of the proposed amendment; and to provide that a candidate found guilty of a criminal violation forfeits the right to hold any elected public office?[2][3]

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References

  1. Colorado Legislative Council, "Ballot Issue History"
  2. El Paso County, Colorado, "Official Sample Ballot for General Election"
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.