Colorado Initiative and Referendum Amendment, Referendum 1 (1980)

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The Colorado Initiative and Referendum Amendment, also known as Referendum 1, was on the November 4, 1980 ballot in Colorado as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. The measure required that persons be registered to vote in order to sign a petition for initiated or referred measures. It also established that any such measures would be submitted to the legislative research and drafting offices of the Colorado General Assembly for review and comment in public meetings before the measures would have a ballot title fixed.[1]

Election results

Colorado Referendum 1 (1980)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 638,731 60.14%
No423,32239.86%

Election results via: State Legislative Council

Text of measure

See also: Colorado State Constitution, Article V and Article XIX

The language on the ballot appeared as:[1]

An amendment to Articles V and XIX of the Constitution of the State of Colorado, concerning the initiative and referendum process, and providing that an elector must be registered in order to sign a petition for an initiated or referred measure and that the proposed initiative measures shall be submitted to the legislative research and drafting offices of the General Assembly for review and comment at a meeting open to the public before a ballot title is fixed.[2]

Constitutional changes

Referendum 1 amended Article V of the Colorado Constitution to read:

Article V
...(2) The first power hereby reserved by the people is the initiative, and signatures by registered electors in an amount equal to at least five percent of the total number of votes cast for all candidates for the office of secretary of state at the previous general election shall be required to propose any measure by petition, and every such petition shall include the full text of the measure so proposed. Initiative petitions for state legislation and amendments to the constitution, in such form as may be prescribed pursuant to law, shall be addressed to and filed with the secretary of state at least three months before the general election at which they are to be voted upon.
(3) The second power hereby reserved is the referendum, and it may be ordered, except as to laws necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, and appropriations for the support and maintenance of the departments of state and state institutions, against any act or item, section, or part of any act of the general assembly, either by a petition signed by registered electors in an amount equal to at least five percent of the total number of votes cast for all candidates for the office of the secretary of state at the previous general election or by the general assembly. Referendum petitions, in such form as may be prescribed pursuant to law, shall be addressed to and filed with the secretary of state not more than ninety days after the final adjournment of the session of the general assembly that passed the bill on which the referendum is demanded. The filing of a referendum petition against any item, section, or part of any act shall not delay the remainder of the act from becoming operative.
...(5) The original draft of the text of proposed initiated constitutional amendments and initiated laws shall be submitted to the legislative research and drafting offices of the general assembly for review and comment. No later than two weeks after submission of the original draft, unless withdrawn by the proponents, the legislative research and drafting offices of the general assembly shall render their comments to the proponents of the proposed measure at a meeting open to the public, which shall be held only after full and timely notice to the public. Such meeting shall be held prior to the fixing of a ballot title. Neither the general assembly nor its committees or agencies shall have any power to require the amendment, modification, or other alteration of the text of any such proposed measure or to establish deadlines for the submission of the original draft of the text of any proposed measure....
(6) The petition shall consist of sheets having such general form printed or written at the top thereof as shall be designated or prescribed by the secretary of state; such petition shall be signed by registered electors in their own proper persons only, to which shall be attached the residence address of such person and the date of signing the same. To each of such petitions, which may consist of one or more sheets, shall be attached an affidavit of some registered elector that each signature thereon is the signature of the person whose name it purports to be and that, to the best of the knowledge and belief of the affiant, each of the persons signing said petition was, at the time of signing, a registered elector. Such petition so verified shall be prima facie evidence that the signatures thereon are genuine and true and that the persons signing the same are registered electors.

Referendum 1 amended Article XIX of the Colorado Constitution to read:

Article XIX
...(3) No measure proposing an amendment or amendments to this constitution shall be submitted by the general assembly to the registered electors of the state containing more than one subject, which shall be clearly expressed in its title; but if any subject shall be embraced in any measure which shall not be expressed in the title, such measure shall be void only as to so much thereof as shall not be so expressed.

See also

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Colorado State Legislative Council, "Ballot History," accessed February 18, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.