Colorado Manitou Springs Gambling, Amendment 13 (1994)

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 13:21, 20 February 2014 by MargaretK (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on Gambling
Roulette.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Local Measures
Colorado Constitution
800px-Flag of Colorado.svg.png
Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIIIXIXXXXXIXXIIXXIIIXXIVXXVXXVIXXVIIXXVIIIXXIXSchedule

The Colorado Manitou Springs Gambling Amendment, also known as Amendment 13, was on the November 8, 1994 ballot in Colorado as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have allowed the placement of slot machines in public airports without a local vote and legalized limited gambling in Manitou Springs without a local vote.

The limited gambling in Manitou Springs had several stipulations, including a maximum of 15 percent taxation of gambling, limited gaming devices or tables to 10,000 and separate taxation and fees from those listed in Colorado State Constitution, Article X.[1]

Election results

Colorado Amendment 13 (1994)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No1,007,55791.72%
Yes 90,936 8.28%

Election results via: Colorado State Legislative Council

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[2][3]

Shall there be an amendment to Article XVIII of the Colorado Constitution to give certain governmental entities the option to place slot machines in public airports without a local vote; to legalize limited gaming in certain areas of the City of Manitou Springs without a local vote; to limit the maximum tax on the proceeds of limited gaming in Manitou Springs to 15%; to limit the total number of limited gaming devices or tables in Manitou Springs to 10,000; to allocate tax and fee revenues from limited gaming in Manitou Springs and from airport slot machine operations; and to exempt gaming revenues from the limitations of Article X, Section 20 of the state constitution (the 1992 "Amendment 1")?[4]

See also

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

External links

References

  1. Colorado Legislative Council, "Ballot Issue History," accessed February 20, 2014
  2. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named CLS
  3. El Paso County, Colorado, "Official Sample Ballot for General Election"
  4. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.