Colorado Excess State Revenues for Math and Science Grants, Referendum F (2000)

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Colorado Referendum F, also known as the Excess State Revenues for Math and Science Grants Act, was on the November 7, 2000 ballot in Colorado as a legislatively-referred state statute, where it was defeated.

Election results

Referendum F
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No887,94756%
Yes 697,673 44%

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

Legislative Statute Analysis by Colorado Legislative Council: Allows the state to keep and spend the first $50 million in excess of the state's constitutional revenue limit for each of the next five years (up to $250 million total); specifies that these moneys be used to distribute grants to school districts for math and science programs; creates a 16-member review committee to administer the program and to award grants to school districts; gives priority to low-income and poorly performing school districts, and to programs with the greatest potential for improving academic performance in math and science; and excludes the money in the proposal from state and school district revenue and spending limits, and reduces taxpayer refunds.

Background and Provisions of the Proposal: Excess state revenue. The state constitution limits annual growth in state revenue to inflation and the annual percentage change in state population. Revenue above this limit must be refunded to taxpayers unless the voters allow the state to keep and spend the excess state revenue. The proposal asks the voters to allow the state to keep and spend $50 million in excess state revenue for each of the next five years. If excess state revenue is less than $50 million in any year, the state would keep the entire amount. The proposal would reduce the average tax refund by approximately $18 per taxpayer or $36 for a married couple in each of the next five years. The total five-year impact would be $90 per taxpayer or $180 for a married couple.

Establishment of a grant program for school funding. The proposal creates a 16-member committee to oversee a performance grant program to distribute money to school districts for math and science programs. The committee, which is authorized to establish rules for the administration of the program, will consist of the seven members of the State Board of Education, three members appointed by the Governor, three state Senators, and three state Representatives.

The proposal sets forth requirements for grant applications and criteria for the committee to consider in awarding grants. Individual schools, including charter schools, must apply for the program through their local school district. In awarding grants, priority must be given to: school districts with an above average percentage of poor students; school districts with below average academic performance in math and science; and programs that have the greatest potential for improving student academic performance in math and science.

See also

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