Colorado Springs City Council Salary Increase Amendment Question (April 2013)

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A Colorado Springs City Council Salary Increase proposal was overwhelmingly defeated on the April 2, 2013 election ballot in El Paso County, which is in Colorado.

If approved, this measure would have amended the Colorado Springs City Charter to increase the Council Member salaries from $6,250 to $48,000. This change would begin applying to all council members elected in 2015. The resolution to put this measure on the ballot for April was passed on January 22 in a 5-4 vote.[1][2]

Election results

Colorado Springs City Question 2
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No64,88479.83%
Yes 16,393 20.17%
These final and official election results are from the Colorado Springs Elections Office.

Text of resolution

AN ORDINANCE SUBMITTING A CHARTER AMENDMENT TO THE ELECTORS OF THE CITY FOR THE GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION TO BE HELD APRIL 2, 2013, RELATING TO COUNCILMEMBER COMPENSATION[3][4]

Support

Council members that voted in favor of the resolution: Council President Scott Hente, Council President Pro Tem Jan Martin and Councilors Lisa Czelatdko, Brandy Williams and Val Snider.

Mayor Steve Bach encouraged this issue to be brought forward arguing that young people cannot afford to be on the Council as they are too busy making a living to devote the requisite full-time hours to the job of being a Council member. Bach is hopeful that this amendment will make it possible to get young professionals involved in city government.[2]

Opposition

Council members that voted against the resolution: Leigh, Angela Dougan, Merv Bennett and Bernie Herpin.

Tim Leigh voiced his opposition to the measure, saying that the changing Council pay should be accomplished as part of a larger effort to make revisions to the city Charter as a whole under the guidance of a Charter review committee.

Paul Kleinschmidt is an active conservative who has campaigned for out-sourcing of city work to private industry. He opposed this measure as well, arguing that the $48,000 dollar salary is arbitrary and hardly constitutes a living wage for a family, which nullifies the primary argument for the amendment.[2]

See also

External links

References

  1. Colorado Springs City Council January 22 Minutes
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Council pay referred to April 2 ballot, February 12, 2013
  3. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named WASH
  4. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.