Difference between revisions of "Colorado Term Limits, Initiative 5 (1990)"

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{{tnr}}{{term limits}}The '''Colorado Term Limits Amendment, Issue 5''' was on the [[Colorado 1990 ballot measures|November 6, 1990 ballot]] in [[Colorado]] as an {{icafull}}, where it was '''approved.'''
 
{{tnr}}{{term limits}}The '''Colorado Term Limits Amendment, Issue 5''' was on the [[Colorado 1990 ballot measures|November 6, 1990 ballot]] in [[Colorado]] as an {{icafull}}, where it was '''approved.'''
  
The approval of Issue 5 resulted in an amendment to the [[Colorado Constitution]] that limits the number of consecutive terms that can be served by the [[Governor of Colorado]], the [[Lieutenant Governor of Colorado]], the [[Colorado Secretary of State]], the [[Attorney General of Colorado]], the [[Colorado State Treasurer]], and all members of the [[Colorado State Legislature]].
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The approval of Issue 5 resulted in an amendment to the [[Colorado Constitution]] that limits the number of consecutive terms that can be served by the [[Governor of Colorado]], the [[Lieutenant Governor of Colorado]], the [[Colorado Secretary of State]], the [[Attorney General of Colorado]], the [[Colorado Treasurer]], and all members of the [[Colorado State Legislature]].
  
 
==Election results==
 
==Election results==

Revision as of 10:57, 10 July 2013

Voting on
Term Limits
Term limits.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot

State legislative
term limits

Gubernatorial
term limits
Lieutenant Governors
term limits
Secretaries of State
term limits
Attorneys General
term limits
State executive
term limits
The Colorado Term Limits Amendment, Issue 5 was on the November 6, 1990 ballot in Colorado as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was approved.

The approval of Issue 5 resulted in an amendment to the Colorado Constitution that limits the number of consecutive terms that can be served by the Governor of Colorado, the Lieutenant Governor of Colorado, the Colorado Secretary of State, the Attorney General of Colorado, the Colorado Treasurer, and all members of the Colorado State Legislature.

Election results

Issue 5
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 708,975 71%
No289,66429%

Text of measure

The question on the ballot was, "Shall there be an amendment to the Colorado Constitution limiting the number of consecutive terms that may be served by the Governor, Lt. Governor, Secretary of State, Attorney General, Treasurer, members of the General Assembly, and United States Senators and Representatives elected from Colorado?"

Constitutional changes

The successful passage of Colorado's 1990 term limits act by voters changed several parts of the Colorado Constitution, including:

"In order to broaden the opportunities for public service and to guard against excessive concentrations of power, no governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state treasurer, or attorney general shall serve more than two consecutive terms in such office. This limitation on the number of terms shall apply to terms of office beginning on or after January 1, 1991. Any person who succeeds to the office of governor or is appointed or elected to fill a vacancy in one of the other offices named in this section, and who serves at least one­half of a term of office, shall be considered to have served a term in that office for purposes of this subsection (2). Terms are considered consecutive unless they are at least four years apart."
"In order to broaden the opportunities for public service and to assure that the general assembly is representative of Colorado citizens, no senator shall serve more than two consecutive terms in the senate, and no representative shall serve more than four consecutive terms in the house of representatives. This limitation on the number of terms shall apply to terms of office beginning on or after January 1, 1991. Any person appointed or elected to fill a vacancy in the general assembly and who serves at least one­half of a term of office shall be considered to have served a term in that office for purposes of this subsection (2). Terms are considered consecutive unless they are at least four years apart."

See also

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