Difference between revisions of "Cory Booker"

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In August 2013, Booker ruled out a run on the ticket of the presidential campaign in 2016.<ref name="president">[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/08/cory-booker-2016-presidential-race-95065.html ''Politico'', "2016 presidential race: Cory Booker rules out run," accessed August 7, 2013]</ref> When asked whether he would rule out running himself or being the vice presidential nominee, Booker answered, “Absolutely yes, unequivocally," adding that his focus is winning the [[United States Senate|seat]] and serving six years, which is a full [[United States Senate|Senate]] term.<ref name="president"/>
 
In August 2013, Booker ruled out a run on the ticket of the presidential campaign in 2016.<ref name="president">[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/08/cory-booker-2016-presidential-race-95065.html ''Politico'', "2016 presidential race: Cory Booker rules out run," accessed August 7, 2013]</ref> When asked whether he would rule out running himself or being the vice presidential nominee, Booker answered, “Absolutely yes, unequivocally," adding that his focus is winning the [[United States Senate|seat]] and serving six years, which is a full [[United States Senate|Senate]] term.<ref name="president"/>
  
===2014===
 
 
===2014===
 
===2014===
 
:: ''See also: [[United States Senate elections in New Jersey, 2014]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[United States Senate elections in New Jersey, 2014]]''

Revision as of 16:17, 10 April 2014

Cory Booker
Cory Booker.jpg
U.S. Senate, New Jersey
Incumbent
In office
October 31, 2013-Present
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 1
PartyDemocratic
PredecessorFrank Lautenberg (D)
Elections and appointments
First electedOctober 16, 2013
Next primaryJune 3, 2014
Next generalNovember 4, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Mayor of Newark, New Jersey
2007-2013
Websites
Office website
Personal website
Campaign website
Cory Anthony Booker (b. April 27, 1969, in Washington, D.C) is a U.S. Senator, representing the state of New Jersey. He won a special election to replace Frank Lautenberg, who died in June 2013. He is the first black man to be elected to the Senate since Barack Obama in 2004.[1]

On June 8, 2013, he announced his candidacy for United States Senate in the special election in New Jersey.[2][3][4] He won the Democratic nomination in the primary on August 13, 2013.[5] He defeated Steve Lonegan (R) and Independent candidates Robert Depasquale, Eugene Martin Lavergne, Stuart David Meissner, Pablo Olivera, Antonio Sabas and Edward Stackhouse, Jr. in the general election on October 16, 2013.[6] He was sworn into office on October 31, 2013.[7]

Booker is a 2014 Democratic candidate seeking re-election to the U.S. Senate from New Jersey.[8]

Committee assignments

U.S. Senate

2013-2014

Booker serves on the following committees:[9]

Issues

Controversy

Christie inauguration

Booker announced in January 2014 that he would not attend Gov. Chris Christie's inaugural address.[10]

Booker's press secretary Monique Waters released a statement on January 21, 2014, "Sen. Booker has back-to-back meetings and will not be in attendance."[10]

Challenge to election

On October 16, 2013, five of the Independent candidates filed a petition with the secretary of the Senate challenging the special election.[11]

The complaint questions the constitutionality, legality and validity of the election on three main issues, and it seeks to have the full Senate vote to label the election result “void.”[11]

The candidates claim three issues with the election should invalidate it: The use of electronic voting machines with no paper backup that will not be “impounded,” that independent candidates were not included in the two debates and that the Republican candidate appears in the first two spaces on ballots, despite a low turnout during the primary.[11]

The petition also sought to have the Senate vote to keep Jeffrey Chiesa, who was appointed following the death of Frank Lautenberg, in office until the petition is investigated and decided.[11]

Sued by National Review

On September 11, 2013, Rich Lowry, the editor of National Review, made an announcement that it would sue Booker, along with the Newark Police Department and the City of Newark, for records related to Booker's claims that he held a dying Wazn Miller after Miller was shot on the streets in Newark in 2004.[12][13]

The announcement came in a post on the National Review website, and according to reports by Politico is the result of repeated attempts by reporters from the National Review to access documents related to Miller's unsolved murder in order to substantiate Booker's claims he was with Miller as he died.[13]

"It should be easy to get more information about the Miller case. New Jersey is an open-records state. Yet for weeks now, we have been stonewalled and given the run-around by everyone we’ve asked for help in obtaining the relevant police records. We’ve asked nicely, we’ve asked firmly, we’ve asked in every way imaginable, but gotten nowhere. It is much easier to learn about the most sensitive aspects of top-secret national-security programs than it is to get Newark police records related to that day," a reporter from National Review said.[13] "Enough is enough. Yesterday we filed suit against the Newark Police Department, the City of Newark, and Mayor Booker to obtain the records in keeping with New Jersey law. This suit shouldn’t be necessary, but the official obstruction in Newark has made it so. In such an instance, everyone should favor openness."[13][12]

After filing the suit, National Review, was able to gain a copy of the police report.[14] The police report contradicts pieces of Booker's account of the event, including his claims that he held Miller while he was dying, the number of gunshots and that he was pronounced dead at the scene. According to the police report, a female bystander held Miller and he was later pronounced dead at the hospital.[14]

The Booker campaign told National Review Online that it stands by the mayor’s version of events. Deriding inquiries as “partisan, Swiftboat journalism at its worst,” the campaign’s communications director Kevin Griffis tells me, “It’s clear from the police report, as well as the statements of police who were on the scene, that the mayor’s description of the incident is accurate.” Booker spokesman James Allen says, “The police reports make clear that Mayor Booker acted courageously, taking action and aiding the victim at the shooting scene until officers and EMTs arrived.”[14]

Booker spokesman James Allen added, “When Mayor Booker arrived at the scene, there were a few individuals trying to hold Mr. Miller up on some steps. The mayor grabbed the victim from behind and with the help of others, carried him to the grass. Another individual was supporting Mr. Miller’s head while Mayor Booker was positioned near the victim’s torso, applying pressure to his chest to try to stop the bleeding and working to clear blood from his mouth. When paramedics arrived, the mayor was still holding the victim and no longer felt a pulse. Sadly, Mr. Miller was declared dead on arrival at the hospital.”[14]

Waywire association

Booker announced on September 6, 2013, that his association with the Internet start-up firm, Waywire, would be coming to an end.[15]

Critics in both parties sharply questioned the prominent role he had played in forming the company, while he was the full-time mayor of the state’s largest city.[15]

Booker had personally helped obtain money from influential investors — including Oprah Winfrey and Eric E. Schmidt, Google’s executive chairman — and tapped the expertise of technology moguls and entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley.[15]

In a statement, Booker’s campaign said that he would be stepping down from Waywire’s board and donating his ownership interest in the company to charity.[15] Booker, in a financial disclosure statement filed with the Senate, estimated that his interest in the company was worth $1 million to $5 million. However, the company is said to be struggling.[15]

“These steps are being taken to remove even the perception that the mayor’s attention would be diverted from his job as senator or that he would stand to personally benefit in any way from his holdings in the company,” Booker's campaign spokesman, Kevin Griffis, said in a statement.[15]


Invention of T-Bone

Booker has been accused of inventing a street character, "T-Bone," for dramatic effect in personal anecdotes.[16] The actual existence of T-Bone, however, is in dispute.[17][16]

On August 29, 2013, The National Review published a story which featured on-the-record comments from three men with deep ties to Newark, who say that a drug dealer named T-Bone has never walked the city’s streets.[16]

When asked whether T-Bone is a real person, Booker spokesperson Kevin Griffis declined to answer the question directly, instead encouraging a reporter to conduct an Internet search related to the issue.[16][17]

“This was a partisan outlet trying to drum up a fake controversy from years ago,” Griffis said of the National Review piece.[17][16]

Booker has been quoted as maintaining that T-Bone was “1,000 percent real” but also an “archetype” of Newark’s problems.[17]

Mocking from Rand Paul

As part of his reasoning behind his decision to campaign for Republican nominee Steve Lonegan, Rand Paul took jabs at Booker as a politician with “an imaginary friend with imaginary problems” on September 6, 2013. The statement is in reference to reports about the Newark drug lord named “T-Bone,” whom Booker has said he befriended.[18]

“If Cory will introduce me to T-Bone when I get there, I’d love to meet T-Bone. If T-Bone’s not real, maybe we need to get Mr. Booker to talk about real problems,” Paul said in an interview.[18]

Paul also described Lonegan as a solid conservative and “defender of the Fourth Amendment” who impressed him during a visit to Washington over the summer.[18]

Booker spokesman Kevin Griffis responded to Paul’s comments by saying that the former Bogota mayor would “raise taxes on the working and middle classes and privatize Social Security, and he even opposed Hurricane Sandy aid."[18]

“As mayor and as a leader of the Tea Party in New Jersey, Mr. Lonegan has only proven that he cares about the plight of the ultra-wealthy and big corporations,” Griffis said.[18]

Snowstorm 2014

Booker announced on Twitter that he would assist the elderly in Newark by shoveling snow following the snowstorm in January 2014. Booker was mayor of Newark before winning the special election in 2013. He invited others to meet up and join his crew. One woman tweeted him, asking for help for her grandparents. Booker responded to the woman, saying he would be there in 30 minutes.[19]

Elections

2016

In August 2013, Booker ruled out a run on the ticket of the presidential campaign in 2016.[20] When asked whether he would rule out running himself or being the vice presidential nominee, Booker answered, “Absolutely yes, unequivocally," adding that his focus is winning the seat and serving six years, which is a full Senate term.[20]

2014

See also: United States Senate elections in New Jersey, 2014

Booker is running in the 2014 election for the U.S. Senate, to represent New Jersey. Booker is seeking the Democratic nomination in the primary on June 3, 2014. The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

2013

See also: United States Senate special election in New Jersey, 2013

Booker ran for U.S. Senate in the special election for the seat left vacant by the death of Frank Lautenberg (D).[2] Booker defeated U.S. Representatives Rush D. Holt, Jr. and Frank Pallone and Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver for the Democratic party nomination in the primary election on August 13, 2013.[5][21][22] He defeated Steve Lonegan (R) and Independent candidates Robert Depasquale, Eugene Martin Lavergne, Stuart David Meissner, Pablo Olivera, Antonio Sabas and Edward Stackhouse, Jr. in the general election on October 16, 2013.[6]

U.S. Senate, New Jersey Special General Election, 2013
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCory Booker 54.9% 740,742
     Republican Steve Lonegan 44% 593,684
     Independent Edward C. Stackhouse 0.4% 5,138
     Independent Robert DePasquale 0.2% 3,137
     Independent Stuart Meissner 0.2% 2,051
     Independent Pablo Olivera 0.1% 1,530
     Independent Antonio Sabas 0.1% 1,336
     Independent Eugene LaVergne 0.1% 1,041
Total Votes 1,348,659
Source: Official results via New Jersey Division of Elections[23]
U.S. Senate, New Jersey Special Democratic Primary, 2013
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngCory Booker 59.2% 216,936
Frank Pallone 19.8% 72,584
Rush Holt 16.8% 61,463
Sheila Oliver 4.3% 15,656
Total Votes 366,639
Source: Official Election Results from New Jersey Division of Elections[24]

Endorsements

Cancelled appearance by Biden

Vice President Joe Biden's planned campaign stop for October 11, 2013, was canceled due the government shutdown.[25]

Mo Cowan

Just weeks before leaving office as the interim Senator in Massachusetts, Mo Cowan endorsed Booker on June 4, 2013 for the seat.[26] Cowan noted that he was just the eighth black American to serve in the Senate, and continued by saying “As I vacate the hallowed halls of Congress, perhaps he’ll come in not too late after me and continue I hope is a very popular trend in the Congress, particular in the Senate, which is to continue to show representation of all people."[26] On June 9, 2013 Booker received the backing of George E. Norcross III, an insurance executive and hospital chairman who is seen as "the most powerful figure in New Jersey Democratic politics" according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.[27]

Polls

November 2012 (Post-Superstorm Sandy)

Between November 14-17 2012, Rutgers and the Eagleton Institute of Politics surveyed 1,228 registered New Jersey voters through live telephone interviews. The respondents were given a series of hypothetical match-ups between incumbent Chris Christie and five potential Democratic candidates, and asked which of the two candidates they would vote for in the 2013 election. The margin of error is +/- 2.9%. [28]

Hypothetical match-ups for Governor of New jersey
Cory BookerRichard CodeyBarbara BuonoLou GreenwaldTom Byrne
Percent of the vote34%31%22%21%22%
Chris Christie's percent of the vote53%56%60%60%58%
Undecided9%10%10%15%16%

October 2012

Between October 10-14 2012, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,405 registered New Jersey voters through live telephone interviews. The respondents were give a series of hypothetical match-ups between incumbent Chris Christie and four potential Democratic candidates, and asked which of the two candidates they would vote for in the 2013 election. The margin of error is +/- 2.6%. Leading the pack of likely challengers is Mayor of Newark Cory Booker, who trails Christie 46-42. A similar survey conducted in early September had Booker behind seven percentage points.[29][30]

Hypothetical match-ups for Governor of New jersey
Cory BookerRichard CodeyBarbara BuonoLou Greenwald
Percent of the vote42%41%33%31%
Chris Christie's percent of the vote46%47%49%50%
Undecided11%11%17%17%

July 2011

Between July 15-18, 2011, Public Policy Polling surveyed 480 New Jersey voters. The respondents were give a series of hypothetical match-ups between incumbent Chris Christie and four potential Democratic candidates, and asked which of the two candidates they would vote for.[31]

Hypothetical match-ups for Governor of New jersey
Cory BookerFrank PalloneBruce SpringsteenSteve Sweeney
Percent of the vote47%43%42%40%
Chris Christie's percent of the vote43%43%42%42%
Undecided10%14%15%18%


2013 Special Election

General election

Special election general election match-up
Poll Cory Booker Steve LoneganUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Conservative Intel
October 13-14, 2013
52%41%5%+/-3.5778
Quinnipiac University
October 10-14, 2013
53%41%6%+/-2.41,696
Rutgers-Eagleton
October 7-13, 2013
58%36%3%+/-4.3513
Monmouth University
October 10-12, 2013
52%42%6%+/-2.61,393
Rasmussen Reports
October 7, 2013
53%41%5%+/-31,000
Stockton Polling Institute
October 3-8, 2013
50%39%11%+/-3.6729
Quinnipiac University
October 5-7, 2013
53%41%6%+/-3.3899
Fairleigh Dickinson University's PublicMind
September 30-October 5, 2013
45%29%26%+/-3.7702
Monmouth University
September 26-29, 2013
53%40%7%+/-4.1571
AVERAGES 52.11% 38.89% 8.33% +/-3.39 920.11
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org
Special election general election match-up
Poll Cory Booker Steve LoneganUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Quinnipiac University
September 19-22, 2013
53%41%6%+/-3.2948
Richard Stockton College
September 15-21, 2013
58%32%8%+/-3.4812
Rutgers-Eagleton
September 3-9, 2013
64%29%7%+/-3.4433
Fairleigh Dickinson University’s PublicMind
August 21-27, 2013
50%22%27%+/-3.7700
Monmouth University/Asbury Park Press
August 15-18, 2013
54%38%8%+/-3.7696
Quinnipiac University
August 1-5, 2013
54%29%17%+/-2.22,042
Quinnipiac University
July 2-7, 2013
53%30%13%+/-31,068
Rasmussen Reports
June 12-13, 2013
50%33%17%+/-31,000
Monmouth University
June 10-11, 2013
53%37%10%+/-3.9636
Quinnipiac University
June 7-9, 2013
54%27%19%+/-3.4858
AVERAGES 54.3% 31.8% 13.2% +/-3.29 919.3
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

Democratic primary

Special election Democratic primary candidates
Poll Cory Booker Rush HoltFrank PalloneSheila OliverUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Quinnipiac University
August 1-5, 2013
54%15%17%5%9%+/-2.22,042
Monmouth University
July 11-14, 2013
49%8%12%3%28%+/-4.9403
Quinnipiac University
July 2-7, 2013
52%8%10%3%26%+/-31,068
Kean University
June 18, 2013
49%9%6%9%22%+/-31,000
Rasmussen Reports
June 12-13, 2013
54%11%8%5%18%+/-31,000
Monmouth University
June 10-11, 2013
63%10%8%6%13%+/-3.9636
Rutgers-Eagleton
June 3-9, 2013
55%9%8%0%28%+/-3.3888
Quinnipiac University
June 7-9, 2013
53%10%9%0%23%+/-3.4858
AVERAGES 53.63% 10% 9.75% 3.88% 20.88% +/-3.34 986.88
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

Note: The Quinnipiac University poll from June 7-9 and Rutgers-Eagleton poll from June 3-9 were concluded prior to the filing deadline for candidates.


Republican primary

Special election Republican primary candidates
Poll Steve Lonegan Alieta EckUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Quinnipiac University
August 1-5, 2013
74%10%13%+/-2.22,042
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

Net worth

See also: Net Worth of United States Senators and Representatives

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Booker's net worth as of 2012 was estimated between $222,018 and $730,000. That averages to $476,009, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic senators in 2012 of $13,566,333.90. Booker ranked as the 9th most wealthy senator in 2012.[32]

Cory Booker Yearly Net Worth
YearAverage Net Worth
2012$476,009.00
The data used to calculate changes in net worth may include changes resulting from assets gained through marriage, inheritance, changes in family estates and/or trusts, changes in family business ownership and many other variables unrelated to a member's behavior in Congress.

Personal

Father's passing

Booker's father, Cary Booker, passed away on October 10, 2013, just 6 days before the special election for the New Jersey Senate seat.[33] The 76 year old suffered a stroke shortly before his death.[33]

The city of Newark released a statement, commenting that he was a well-regarded member of the community: “Many people in our city came to know and love Cary Booker. Mayor Booker’s father was an inspiration to him, and someone the mayor has often credited with being a principal reason for him entering public service.”[33]

Twitter use

As of June 25, 2013 Booker had logged more than 3,000 tweets already in 2013. That made him roughly twice as active as the most prolific sitting U.S. Senator.[34] He has turned to the popular online messaging service, Twitter, for tasks as varied as updating his campaign stops, promoting voter registration drives, deflecting romantic entreaties from smitten fans, and broadcasting the philosophical musings of Gautama Buddha, Babe Ruth and himself.[34]

By contrast, Sen. John Cornyn (R) of Texas, the upper chamber’s most productive Twitter user, had tallied just 1,720 tweets in 2013, followed by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I) of Vermont with 1,445 posts, Kirsten Gillibrand (D) of New York with 1,181 posts, Patty Murray (D) of Washington with 1,068 and Mike Crapo (R) of Idaho with 1,016 posts.[34]

Speculation about personal life

Speculation about Booker's sexuality — specifically, that he is gay but keeping that a secret — took center stage in the Senate campaign in late August 2013.[35] In a series of interviews with national media outlets, Booker and Lonegan both commented about an issue that has trailed Booker, who is single, since he first ran for office in Newark.[35]

Booker generally does not answer when asked about his sexuality, but in interviews has referred to former girlfriends and dating women. In a July 22, 2013 interview he noted he is "a voice for marriage equality that had me the national speaker in Washington, as a straight male, the national speaker for the Human Rights Campaign."[35]

He has also talked about his "great dismay" that he has not "settled down with a life partner." He said he has been dating more at the encouragement of a pastor friend but tries to keep that part of his life private.[35] "Because how unfair is it to a young lady to put them in the spotlight if they haven't signed up for that yet?" Booker said. "And people who think I'm gay, some part of me thinks it's wonderful. Because I want to challenge people on their homophobia. I love seeing on Twitter when someone says I'm gay, and I say, 'So what does it matter if I am? So be it. I hope you are not voting for me because you are making the presumption that I'm straight.'"[35]

In an interview, Lonegan, the Republican candidate in the 2013 senate election, called Booker's remarks "kind of weird." He also said he didn't know whether Booker is gay. "It's kind of weird. As a guy, I personally like being a guy. I don't know if you saw the stories last year. They've been out for quite a bit about how he likes to go out at 3 o'clock in the morning for a manicure and a pedicure," Lonegan said.[35]

Lonegan was referring to an interview Booker did last summer with a newly launched magazine, Du Jour, in which he talked about getting manicures and pedicures. Lonegan said his team looked but was unable to locate such a business in Newark that is open 24 hours a day.[35]

"Maybe that helps to get him the gay vote, by acting ambiguous. That I can't address," Lonegan said. All I know is I don't like going out in the middle of the night, or any time of the day, for a manicure and pedicure. It was described as his peculiar fetish, is how it was described. I have a more peculiar fetish. I like a good Scotch and a cigar. That's my fetish, but we'll just compare the two."[35]

In response, Booker called Lonegan's comments "unacceptable."[35]

"That's just sad. Honestly, that's just really sad. It's just disheartening to hear somebody, in this day and age in the United States of America, say, basically implicate, that gay men are not men, that they're not guys. It's shocking to one's conscience," Booker said. "That kind of callous, bigoted disrespect to gays and lesbians shouldn't be tolerated."[35]

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References

  1. Washington Post, "Cory Booker sworn in as a U.S. senator," accessed October 31, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 Politico, "Cory Booker announces New Jersey senate run" accessed June 8, 2013
  3. The New York Times, "http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/21/nyregion/booker-wont-run-for-governor-eyes-senate-bid.html?hp&_r=1&," December 20, 2012
  4. Politico, "Report: Cory Booker may take on Chris Christie," August 24, 2012
  5. 5.0 5.1 WNYC, "Election 2013," accessed August 13, 2013
  6. 6.0 6.1 NY Times, "New Jersey Senate 2013," accessed October 16, 2013
  7. Roll Call, "Cory Booker Swearing-In Set for Oct. 31," accessed October 24, 2013
  8. New Jersey Division of Elections, "Official List of Candidates for US Senate," accessed April 10, 2014
  9. Politico, "Cory Booker is the Senate’s new star," accessed November 19, 2013
  10. 10.0 10.1 Talking Points Memo, "Sen. Booker Won't Attend Christie Inaugural Speech," accessed January 22, 2014
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 NJ.com, "Independent U.S. Senate candidates file petition challenging election," accessed October 21, 2013
  12. 12.0 12.1 National Review, "NR v. Booker," accessed September 12, 2013
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 Politico, "National Review to sue Cory Booker," accessed September 12, 2013
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 National Review, "‘Fell into My Arms’," accessed September 16, 2013
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 NY Times, "Booker to End Association With Start-Up He Founded," accessed September 10, 2013
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 National Review, "Cory Booker’s Imaginary Friend," accessed September 2, 2013
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 Real Clear Politics, "Booker Accused of Inventing Oft-Cited Drug Dealer," accessed September 2, 2013
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 Politico, "Rand Paul mocks Cory Booker," accessed September 12, 2013
  19. The Hill, "Booker tweets his snow shoveling efforts," accessed January 3, 2014
  20. 20.0 20.1 Politico, "2016 presidential race: Cory Booker rules out run," accessed August 7, 2013
  21. Roll Call, "Pallone Makes Preparations for Senate Campaign in N.J.," January 2, 2012
  22. Politico, "Cory Booker’s unexpected sprint for Senate" accessed June 5, 2013
  23. New Jersey Division of Elections, "Special Election General Election Results," accessed November 7, 2013
  24. New Jersey Division of Elections, "Unofficial Primary Special Election Results," accessed November 7, 2013
  25. Washington Post, "Shutdown scraps Biden’s plans to stump for Cory Booker," accessed October 8, 2013
  26. 26.0 26.1 Politico, "Mo Cowan endorses Cory Booker run" accessed June 6, 2013
  27. Philly.com "Norcross backs Booker for Senate" accessed June 11, 2013
  28. Rutgers Eagleton Center for Public Polling, "Christie Ratings and Re-elect 2012 Poll," November 26, 2012
  29. Quinnipiac University, "October 17, 2012 - Booker Is Strongest Dem To Face Christie, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds; Voters Say Show Me The Money Before Tax Cut Vote," October 17, 2012
  30. Quinnipiac University, "New Jersey Gov. Christie Gets No GOP Convention Bounce, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds; Voters Most Biased Against Atheists, Muslims," September 5, 2012
  31. Public Policy Polling, "Christie in trouble for re-election," July 20, 2011
  32. OpenSecrets, "Cory Booker," (D-NY), 2012," accessed February 18, 2014
  33. 33.0 33.1 33.2 Politico, "Cory Booker’s father dies at 76," accessed October 11, 2013
  34. 34.0 34.1 34.2 The Hill, "Cory Booker would likely smash Twitter records in the Senate" accessed June 25, 2013
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 35.3 35.4 35.5 35.6 35.7 35.8 35.9 USA Today, "Cory Booker's sexuality becomes issue in Senate race," accessed August 30, 2013
Political offices
Preceded by
Jeff Chiesa (R)
U.S. Senate, New Jersey
October 31, 2013–present
Succeeded by
N/A
Preceded by
Sharpe James
Mayor of Newark, New Jersey
2007-2013
Succeeded by
N/A